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Ologhai Jones

Emotive Words In The News

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It's a tired, old subject, and I have nothing new to add really, but...

I just heard, on the Radio 4 Today programme news bulletin, that Colonel Gaddafi is still intent upon 'clinging onto' power. What's wrong with saying that he's still intent on 'remaining in' power or something?

Even if 'commercial' news feels a bit beyond control, I would really like the BBC to be a lot more careful. 'Clinging onto' power might sound more exciting, but I guess I don't believe that the News shouldn't try to tell people what to think.

Edited to change 'Emptive' in the title to 'Emotive' -- wish I'd spotted it earlier! :lol:

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Along similar lines but slightly O/T in that it's not on the news.

When people say.."he/she was rushed into hospital..." to add theatrics.

I hear this quite a lot as an excuse for lateness in my company.. "Sorry I'm late, my uncle was rushed into hospital this morning"

"Oh, ok then, as he was transported to hospital at sufficent velocity to be described in this way, your lateness is excused. In fact, take 5 minutes and calm yourself down, that must have been traumatic. Lateness, however will not be tolerated if your uncles delivery to hospital is a dawdle or perhaps a meander."

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'boy 12, critical after being shot.'

Just critical eh? Not angry?

Btw - what does emptive mean?

I'm going to be pre-emptive and reply - I think it should be emotive?

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It's a tired, old subject, and I have nothing new to add really, but...

I just heard, on the Radio 4 Today programme news bulletin, that Colonel Gaddafi is still intent upon 'clinging onto' power. What's wrong with saying that he's still intent on 'remaining in' power or something?

Even if 'commercial' news feels a bit beyond control, I would really like the BBC to be a lot more careful. 'Clinging onto' power might sound more exciting, but I guess I don't believe that the News shouldn't try to tell people what to think.

it's just a way of showing political bias without being open about it.

Col G clings to power.

Col G stands firm in the face of outside forces.

Col G and his band of fierce lovers of freedom vow to maintain their protection of libya.

Acvtually he's just the head of an organised crime racket but hey ho.

You see this all the time, it's a pretty good way of finding out what is going to be done by the PTB, to be honest. Theres a drop the dead donkey episode all about this that's quite good iirc. "Unions demands rejected by chairman/Fatcats deny workers rights/Consumers to be shafted by union troublemakers/Billionaire owner to hike prices rather than cut into profits"

And so on.

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Such and such is set to blah blah. e.g. House prices are set to soar.

It's just a way of making a fanciful prediction sound more authoritative than a proper conditional like "might" or "could".

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I'm going to be pre-emptive and reply - I think it should be emotive?

Very embarrassing, sorry! :lol:

Ahem -- yes, it was supposed to be emotive -- wish I'd spotted it when I posted! ;)

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My favourite at the moment is the KFC advert which proudly claims "Fresh on the bone chicken in every store".

The obvious thing to say is all our chicken is fresh, or even if they wanted to be specific all our on the bone chicken is fresh, but no it is clearly "fresh on the bone chicken in every store". How much is fresh, just one piece would meet the claim.

It's amazing really how much an 8 word sentence can be twisted so much, almost every word has been tweeked to essentially fool you, or certainly give an impress which I'm sure doesn't match reality.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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