Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Pole

'inside Job' Wins Oscar

Recommended Posts

Financial meltdown documentary wins Oscar

"Inside Job," a film blaming financial institutions for triggering the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, won the Academy Award for best documentary on Sunday.

Director Charles Ferguson started off his acceptance speech lamenting that "not a single financial executive has gone to jail and that is wrong," drawing applause from the Hollywood celebrity audience.

"Inside Job," the second Oscar-nominated documentary by Ferguson and his co-producer Audrey Marrs, was considered the front-runner for the Oscar after it won the Directors Guild of America award for best documentary.

The film had impressed critics and the industry alike with its expansive cinematography, global reach, fast-paced narrative and pointed interviews.

Ferguson, a self-described "policy wonk" with a doctorate in political science, interviewed fund managers, central bankers and political advisers for his film, which uncovered an uncomfortably close professional relationship between academia and hedge funds.

But not everyone was willing to subject themselves to his pointed questions, including key players like Henry Paulson, the former CEO of Goldman Sachs and treasury secretary at the worst moments of the economic implosion.

He also expected more from the new government.

"The biggest surprise to me personally and biggest disappointment was that nobody in the Obama administration would speak with me even off the record -- including people that I've known for many, many years," Ferguson said backstage.

He believes Americans, who lost homes and jobs in the millions because of shady mortgage lending and bank collapses, are disappointed that "nothing has been done."

"Unfortunately, I think that the reason is predominantly that the financial industry has become so politically powerful that it is able to inhibit the normal process of justice and law enforcement," said Ferguson.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to this, it was out on the 18th and is showing at these cinemas:

Picture House - Cambridge

38-39 St. Andrews Street, Cambridge, CB2 3AR‎Website Distance: 46.4 miles (approx.)

Picture House - London Stratford East

Salway Road, Stratford, London E15 1‎Website Distance: 53.4 miles (approx.)

ODEON - Covent Garden

135 Shaftesbury Avenue, London, WC2H 8AHWebsite Distance: 60.5 miles (approx.)

Empire - Leicester Square

5-6 Leicester Square, London, WC2H 7NAWebsite Distance: 60.7 miles (approx.)

Picture House - London Ritzy

Brixton Oval, Brixton, London, SW2 1JQWebsite Distance: 61.5 miles (approx.)

Curzon Cinemas - Mayfair

38 Curzon Street, Mayfair, London, W1J 7TYWebsite Distance: 61.6 miles (approx.)

Cineworld - Chelsea

279 Kings Road,Chelsea, London, SW3 5EWWebsite Distance: 63.4 miles (approx.)

Edited by MC Fur Q

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you know where we can see this film?

Showing at a couple of places near me. A Cineworld and The Showroom (more arty sort of place).

It's a good film. They do seem to fixate a bit on academics and their links to the banksters at the end but overall, very good I thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That film is diversive propaganda, it doesn't blame the real culprits and doesn't go deep enough.

It's meant to confuse rather than reveal anything.

Do you REALLY think Hollywood (the primary propaganda machine of the 'elites' of this world) would tell you the full truth?

See here:

http://www.imdb.com/.../nest/169871144

Edited by wise_eagle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've got it at The Lighthouse, Poole, Dorset for one day only in April.

It's out on DVD in June as far as I know....

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Inside-Job-DVD-Matt-Damon/dp/B003LPUMHM

http://www.lovefilm.com/film/Inside-Job/152822/

I'm told you can stream it [or whatever the term is] from the web - but I actually would like to see the people who made this film to get legitimately paid by people watching it at cinemas and on proper dvd's - because - quite frankly - they deserve it. ;)

Edited by eric pebble

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've got it at The Lighthouse, Poole, Dorset for one day only in April.

Would that be the 1st of April!

Very interesting we can see a film about something "we all know", worthy of Oscars,

when nobody is to blame! Otherwise they would be punished, right? :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's out on DVD in June as far as I know....

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Inside-Job-DVD-Matt-Damon/dp/B003LPUMHM

http://www.lovefilm.com/film/Inside-Job/152822/

I'm told you can stream it [or whatever the term is] from the web - but I actually would like to see the people who made this film to get legitimately paid by people watching it at cinemas and on proper dvd's - because - quite frankly - they deserve it. ;)

i would watch it in the cinema if there was sufficient leg room, i'm never paying £10 to have my knees crushed again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watched it last night.

Starts off with Iceland and how the bubble was allowed to inflate much faster than it ever should have and that the 'ambitions' of three small banks (as they were) brought down the whole Country.

Made a point of saying that in order to curtail the Icelandic regulators (mainly lawyers) getting to close to the truth the banks would offer them jobs they couldn't refuse.

Goes on but concentrates the vast majority of its footage to the huge US investment banks you know who the culprits are. From a UK perspective none of our banks get a mention except Barclays when it looked to buy out the carcass of Lehmans.

Part of the wiki page for the film description.

The film focuses on changes in the financial industry in the decade leading up to the crisis, the political movement toward deregulation, and how the development of complex trading such as the derivatives market allowed for large increases in risk taking that circumvented older regulations that were intended to control systemic risk. In describing the crisis as it unfolded, the film also looks at conflicts of interest in the financial sector, many of which it suggests are not properly disclosed. The film suggests that these conflicts of interest affected credit rating agencies as well as academics who receive funding as consultants but do not disclose this information in their academic writing, and that these conflicts played a role in obscuring and exacerbating the crisis.

All in all a very informative piece of work. It ties in nicely and goes to lengths to explain why Fulds, Bernanke and others at the very top should have answered charges. The eye opener for me was the so called financial experts who (US) Government was consulting with a view to regulating were themselves in hock to (and financed by) the banks where they were writing papers and articles calling for more deregulation.

The work was probably worthy of its award but will it make a big difference? I doubt it it is to complex to be shown on BBC1 at prime time and when the time comes it will probably be regulated to a late night BBC2 slot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw it the other night and it was good, but nothing new to a regular reader of this site. What was interesting was how badly the academics came across in this film. But that could be due to the fact that they aren't as adept at dodging questions as politicians and bankers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watched it last night.

Starts off with Iceland and how the bubble was allowed to inflate much faster than it ever should have and that the 'ambitions' of three small banks (as they were) brought down the whole Country.

Made a point of saying that in order to curtail the Icelandic regulators (mainly lawyers) getting to close to the truth the banks would offer them jobs they couldn't refuse.

Goes on but concentrates the vast majority of its footage to the huge US investment banks you know who the culprits are. From a UK perspective none of our banks get a mention except Barclays when it looked to buy out the carcass of Lehmans.

Part of the wiki page for the film description.

The film focuses on changes in the financial industry in the decade leading up to the crisis, the political movement toward deregulation, and how the development of complex trading such as the derivatives market allowed for large increases in risk taking that circumvented older regulations that were intended to control systemic risk. In describing the crisis as it unfolded, the film also looks at conflicts of interest in the financial sector, many of which it suggests are not properly disclosed. The film suggests that these conflicts of interest affected credit rating agencies as well as academics who receive funding as consultants but do not disclose this information in their academic writing, and that these conflicts played a role in obscuring and exacerbating the crisis.

All in all a very informative piece of work. It ties in nicely and goes to lengths to explain why Fulds, Bernanke and others at the very top should have answered charges. The eye opener for me was the so called financial experts who (US) Government was consulting with a view to regulating were themselves in hock to (and financed by) the banks where they were writing papers and articles calling for more deregulation.

The work was probably worthy of its award but will it make a big difference? I doubt it it is to complex to be shown on BBC1 at prime time and when the time comes it will probably be regulated to a late night BBC2 slot.

I doubt it it is to too complex to be shown on BBC1 at prime time.... :angry: :angry: :angry:

Edited by eric pebble

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.