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Here's the article, green shoots and all ...

UK economic growth held up in February, figures to show

The latest round of the purchasing managers' indexes (PMIs), which measure monthly changes in activity, should paint a more encouraging picture of the direction in which the economy is heading.

The resilient data is expected to shore up economists' expectations that rates will rise in May by a quarter of a point, as the recovery will look better placed to withstand the impact.

The last set of the Markit/CIPS PMIs prompted a sigh of relief as they showed that the two weaker sectors of the economy – services and construction – both bounced back in January, after contracting as the snow disrupted business in the previous month.

That raised hopes that Britain would avoid plunging into a double-dip recession in the wake of the economy's shock contraction as the snow hit in the previous quarter. :rolleyes:

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) on Friday revised this fourth quarter fall in GDP further downwards, from 0.5pc to an even worse 0.6pc.

Since the statisticians still think the bad weather wiped half a percentage point off growth, the new figure signalled that underlying recovery had not just stalled, but went into reverse.

The data will have intensified the focus on the latest PMIs, as they will show whether the bounce-back is holding up or whether fundamental growth looks dangerously weak.

The crucial survey will be Thursday's PMI for the service industries, which account for three quarters of total GDP and have suffered from the effects of shaky consumer confidence.

Activity is expected to have kept growing, but at a slower rate. The PMI is expected to give an unspectacular but healthy reading of up to 54, after January's 54.5, where anything over the 50 mark points to growth.

Manufacturing will stay the success story, after the latest industrial trends survey from the CBI confirmed that the sector's resurgence continues to gather pace.

Factories are generally expected to have seen only a slight slowdown in activity, after hitting a record high of 62 in January, as exports kept improving.

Construction, the sector most exposed to the December snow, is expected to have seen modest growth as it continued to catch up on work that was delayed.

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from above

a) The resilient data is expected to shore up economists' expectations that .........

Data is data, since when has it been 'ahem' resilient

B) since the statisticians second rate mathematicians still think the bad weather wiped half a percentage point off growth,....

Hot air, VI's, ramping etc, when everything is tainted by politics, power bases, etc, that's why you need statisticians, pundits and experts.

ps. Apologies for my tongue in cheek remarks to all, including statisticians ;-)

Edited by voidal

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Here's the article, green shoots and all ...

UK economic growth held up in February, figures to show

The latest round of the purchasing managers' indexes (PMIs), which measure monthly changes in activity, should paint a more encouraging picture of the direction in which the economy is heading.

The resilient data is expected to shore up economists' expectations that rates will rise in May by a quarter of a point, as the recovery will look better placed to withstand the impact.

The last set of the Markit/CIPS PMIs prompted a sigh of relief as they showed that the two weaker sectors of the economy – services and construction – both bounced back in January, after contracting as the snow disrupted business in the previous month.

That raised hopes that Britain would avoid plunging into a double-dip recession in the wake of the economy's shock contraction as the snow hit in the previous quarter. :rolleyes:

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) on Friday revised this fourth quarter fall in GDP further downwards, from 0.5pc to an even worse 0.6pc.

Since the statisticians still think the bad weather wiped half a percentage point off growth, the new figure signalled that underlying recovery had not just stalled, but went into reverse.

The data will have intensified the focus on the latest PMIs, as they will show whether the bounce-back is holding up or whether fundamental growth looks dangerously weak.

The crucial survey will be Thursday's PMI for the service industries, which account for three quarters of total GDP and have suffered from the effects of shaky consumer confidence.

Activity is expected to have kept growing, but at a slower rate. The PMI is expected to give an unspectacular but healthy reading of up to 54, after January's 54.5, where anything over the 50 mark points to growth.

Manufacturing will stay the success story, after the latest industrial trends survey from the CBI confirmed that the sector's resurgence continues to gather pace.

Factories are generally expected to have seen only a slight slowdown in activity, after hitting a record high of 62 in January, as exports kept improving.

Construction, the sector most exposed to the December snow, is expected to have seen modest growth as it continued to catch up on work that was delayed.

Must have been asleep with my last post.

Telegraph, barely worth a reply.

If the FT, Times, Guardian etc had written something like that, then I'd find it worth the effort replying.

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Are we seeing a switch in vested interests now?

The BBC flammed by Cameron for ramping down the economy.

Telegraph, ramping up?

ps. Opened your thread. No need to eat your hat. i think it's downward from here despite Londons mini property boon masking the HPI figures

(unless we have more QE)

Boom even, and the QE bit wasnt meant, they wouldnt ,would they, I think inflation is out already.

However, there will be falls in houseprices, they just wont look so bad...will they ????

Edited by voidal

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from above

a) The resilient data is expected to shore up economists' expectations that .........

Data is data, since when has it been 'ahem' resilient

B) since the statisticians second rate mathematicians still think the bad weather wiped half a percentage point off growth,....

Hot air, VI's, ramping etc, when everything is tainted by politics, power bases, etc, that's why you need statisticians, pundits and experts.

ps. Apologies for my tongue in cheek remarks to all, including statisticians ;-)

EVERYTHING is in the context of HPI. "Resilient" and "buoyant" are the two top terms to describer UK Plc as both refer to house prices.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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