Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Bruce Banner

One Lamb Chop A Day

Recommended Posts

Latest health advice is that we should eat no more red meat than the equivalent of one lamb chop a day :rolleyes:.

All the more for me then :D.

everything is bad for you................ except beer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

everything is bad for you................ except beer

I never take any notice of these health "scares", more often than not they change their minds a few years later and anyway, you've got to die of something, so it might as well be something that you enjoy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never take any notice of these health "scares", more often than not they change their minds a few years later and anyway, you've got to die of something, so it might as well be something that you enjoy.

agreed

right breat milk rice pudding for tea :D:D:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, can't reply, no vomit emoticon.

Here you go.

Vomit.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went off lamb after helping my old man out during a lambing season.

During the lambing, I went to a dinner party where the host made lamb shanks which were particularly rare - the smell of which as i chewed on it, reminded me of the prolapses, afterbirth, poo, blood and stillbirths we encountered. I had to struggle to keep the first few mouthfulls down and disguised the rest by hiding it in the mashed potato.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hear that more than 1oz of cheese a week is bad, but dried eggs and milk are de rigour.

And digging for Britain is great for the exercise.

Corporal Jones will help out with my rations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hear that more than 1oz of cheese a week is bad, but dried eggs and milk are de rigour.

And digging for Britain is great for the exercise.

Corporal Jones will help out with my rations.

It was 1600 deaths a year.Which makes meat eating about as dangerous as driving a car and a lot less than motor cycling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was 1600 deaths a year.Which makes meat eating about as dangerous as driving a car and a lot less than motor cycling.

yep, they say too much red meat could contribute to bowel cancers which kill upto 1600 a year so they plucked a figure out of the air to recommend as a safe amount :lol:

Let's face it, they still dont know fk all about cancer and it is just as likely caused by all of the chemicals now in our water and food or pollutants in the atmosphere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About 30 years ago, the American Heart Association ran a test to determine their theory was correct.

The theory was that fat was the enemy.

So the test was conducted using docs and nurses since they were more liable to stick to the programme and not cheat.

Half the group carried on eating as before: typical American diet, loads of burgers, fat etc.

The other half went onto a very fat-restricted "Healthy" diet.

At the conclusion of the test the two groups presented with little difference in cardio-vascular disease.

However, the Low Fat group showed a far higher incidence of bowel cancer and other digestive disorders.

Meat which is naturally grazed, particularly beef, produces essentially Polyunsaturate fat: whereas intensive reared animals produce Polysaturate fat: mainly because of all the synthetic feedstuffs and lack of natural exercise and environment.

Pigs today, for example, carry circa 1,200% greater fat than properly reared free range "Natural" pigs.

Eat New Zealand lamb and free range organic beef if you can afford it: occasionally.

Avoid processed meat: particularly pork products such as bacon, ham and sausages, unless, once again, free range organic, because they are chock full of very nasty chemicals: which is why when you fry bacon from such as Chavda, loads of nasty white gloop and liquid emerges.

At least, European farm animals are free from growth hormones: unlike the USA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
.....they are chock full of very nasty chemicals: which is why when you fry bacon from such as Chavda, loads of nasty white gloop and liquid emerges.

I thought it was because they inject it with salt water to make it heavier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought it was because they inject it with salt water to make it heavier.

Well the salts and nitrite they inject to 'cure' it are in a water solution.

This is the difference between industrial bacon and good quality dry cured bacon - bacon is rolled in salt and gently massaged into the meat by the butcher ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought it was because they inject it with salt water to make it heavier.

Curing pork joints was traditionally accomplished by steeping the raw meat in a bath of common salt and Saltpetre.

Now banned.

So they use a cocktail of rather unpleasant chemicals to stabilise the meat and prevent oxidisation.

And, as you say, it's a given that cheap factory produced meat products are injected with copious quantities of water to increase weight.

Unfortunately, the other trick is to additionally inject the meat with remaindered animal protein: the nasty stuff that emerges from rendering plants.

This trick is also used with cheap nasty battery raised chicken: particularly from Holland.

So if you like chicken injected with ground up sheep guts and beef skin etc......................................

Dry Cured ham is best accomplished with rock salt and various herbs and spices: and smoking best done with natural smoke houses using selected wood sawdust etc such as Hickory.

Which all takes time and costs money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have my doubts as to why they are wanting us to eat less meat.....cost is the major one, meat is very labour and cost intensive to produce, animals eat much in vegetable matter to produce 1lb of meat....that land could be used to grow wheat, corn, rapeseed or even biofuel.....meat will only increase in price, so getting used to eating less or giving it up will not only improve our health but also our bank balance....... ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would prefer they didn't grow wheat/corn/grains and allowed animals to pasture. You know, as nature intended.

Grains are nutritionally empty, full of lectins and especially with the modern bred version, very high in gluten. Responsbile for all sorts of nastiness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BBC now saying your daily quota is three rashers of bacon.... OR two slices of processed beef... OR one lamb chop :rolleyes:.

The only sort of chop I have one of is a beef chop :D.

Nicely topped off with a big serving of breast milk sauce?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would prefer they didn't grow wheat/corn/grains and allowed animals to pasture. You know, as nature intended.

Grains are nutritionally empty, full of lectins and especially with the modern bred version, very high in gluten. Responsbile for all sorts of nastiness.

I disagree

Humans were eating grains for 5000 years with no problems - something else is at work here with the explosion in autoimmune illness in the last 200 years - check out hygiene hypothesis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I disagree

Humans were eating grains for 5000 years with no problems - something else is at work here with the explosion in autoimmune illness in the last 200 years - check out hygiene hypothesis.

Or those with it in the past tended to die very quickly anyway, and went unnoticed in the generally high number of early deaths.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meat which is naturally grazed, particularly beef, produces essentially Polyunsaturate fat: whereas intensive reared animals produce Polysaturate fat: mainly because of all the synthetic feedstuffs and lack of natural exercise and environment.

That whole post is pretty inaccurate. Saturated fats are generally solid at room temperature. Whenever you see a thick bit of white fatty tissue in your meat, however it was raised, that is saturated fat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or those with it in the past tended to die very quickly anyway, and went unnoticed in the generally high number of early deaths.

Not in the amounts we do. It just wouldn't be worth collecting, gathering, milling, etc compared to eating starchy tubers, cruciferous vegetables, and meat.

There is a ton of research out there. Robb Wolf is well worth a Google.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.