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Where Would You Go And What Would You Do?

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Situation is this. Partner is early 40's and in relatively good employment - long hours though. I am late 30's and at home with three kids under six. We are not unhappy but lacking some challenges and excitement.

Financially we are doing quite well although my partner works in construction which isn't quite stable at the moment. Our perfectly adequate house is paid off and we have a good amount of money in the bank. We are quite happy in the UK but would consider moving abroad. One of us is Dutch by origin but actually we're not excited by the prospect of moving to the Netherlands.

Would you consider buying a business in the UK or abroad and if yes, what? We have construction and marketing skills which aren't terribly useful in hindsight. I feel we are a bit old to re-train so buying an existing business seems an option. But what is a good idea in the current climate?

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Very helpful.

My partner is an engineer and has only made an honest living working on construction projects like railways and building stadiums and the like. We both got into jobs in our early 20's without really thinking about it. Now we obviously realise that there is more to life but we certainly didn't think that much about it when we got into these jobs. Like most people I guess.

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Use your marketing skills to lobby the public/ government for the need to build more houses, as the UK has a huge shortage.

Then, once planning permission laws have been reduced in severity your partner can start a building company to build the houses.

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Now we obviously realise that there is more to life

It really depends upon your skills, what you want to do, how hard you want to work, and perhaps how much you need an urban way of life and other people's company...can you educate your own children ?

Small local shops in market towns can be a gold mine if you choose the right location and business, which both need a lot of research, what does the community need ? a greengrocers, general store, good ironmongers. I know people who have set up all of these and are minting it, however, they traveled the country for a couple of years to find the 'right' place.

Can you sail ? I have friends who paid off the house (worked hard + lucky Inheritance), rented it out and bought a large ocean going yacht, and are literally sailing the world with their 3-4 yr old kids looking for somewhere better to live, they have been sailing 18 months now!

Go and work in the developing world for a charity, plenty could use your skills. Both the last two would give your children an amazing upbringing if you can educate them

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It really depends upon your skills, what you want to do, how hard you want to work, and perhaps how much you need an urban way of life and other people's company...can you educate your own children ?

Small local shops in market towns can be a gold mine if you choose the right location and business, which both need a lot of research, what does the community need ? a greengrocers, general store, good ironmongers. I know people who have set up all of these and are minting it, however, they traveled the country for a couple of years to find the 'right' place.

Can you sail ? I have friends who paid off the house (worked hard + lucky Inheritance), rented it out and bought a large ocean going yacht, and are literally sailing the world with their 3-4 yr old kids looking for somewhere better to live, they have been sailing 18 months now!

Go and work in the developing world for a charity, plenty could use your skills. Both the last two would give your children an amazing upbringing if you can educate them

Thanks LIH. We would e quite happy to home educate the children up to secondary level, which would give us a good 6 more years before we have to worry about schools. I wouldn't want to be in total isolation so small town to larger size town would be great. Small local shops idea is a good one, did your friends buy an existing shop or did they start one?

We can't sail and I think I would be scared of pirates! We thought before about working for a charity, the problem is what are you going to do when you come back?

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Small local shops idea is a good one, did your friends buy an existing shop or did they start one?

One start up, two existing businesses, but they took a long time doing their research, busy market towns, no superstore within 4 miles, parking for a few cars outside, existing accounts etc etc.

the problem is what are you going to do when you come back?

You probably won't come back.

I have a feeling that if I leave it will be for good. Apart from the coast and the countryside there is not much left of the UK that I enjoy. Leaving it to my sailing friends to find 'that place'; then I'll turn up and ruin it for them <_<

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People often don't realise how good the UK is until they have lived elsewhere. I would argue that is the same for the Netherlands.

There is another thread on here in the last few days about living in the US and that has some excellent pros and cons.

I think you can live a very happy life in somewhere like Colorado, Washington State, Oregon and not have to worry about what is happening in the outside world - if you were so inclined. People are friendly, quality of life is excellent. But perhaps you would miss the culture, humour and other things from the UK and Europe. Perhaps, with the Internet, that is less of a problem?

Canada is tempting but they have harsh winters that would destroy me and in some parts the Summers can result in midges everywhere. Oz sounds more and more like a country designed to kill people. NZ is full of lovely people and the quality of life is excellent... but some claim it is dull with little to do if you are not big into the outdoors such as hiking, rafting, yachting, etc. I doubt I would sleep at night in NZ now after seeing the tragedy of Christchurch on the news. My heart goes out to them.

I find the draw of Singapore and Asia appealing. It is certainly the exciting place to be but I think it would be more of a work and live there for 5 years then move 'home'.

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We have lived abroad and I was raised in the Netherlands. It is a great country but I actually prefer the UK. I think the UK is actually a great country and personally think its people should be a bit more proud of it and not put it down all the time. It is really not that bad.

I would consider New Zealand, we do actually have friends there but it is just too far away. I love Asia but as TMT mentioned I think it would never quite feel like home. I would love to move to other parts of Europe but realistically language is a problem although with time you can learn.

What would you do if you were in our position and you would stay in Europe or even the UK? Where would you base yourself and what kind of business would you be thinking of? Our skills are unfortunately quite general but we are not afraid of hard work and we do not aim to be millionaires, we just want a nice life.

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We have lived abroad and I was raised in the Netherlands. It is a great country but I actually prefer the UK. I think the UK is actually a great country and personally think its people should be a bit more proud of it and not put it down all the time. It is really not that bad.

I would consider New Zealand, we do actually have friends there but it is just too far away. I love Asia but as TMT mentioned I think it would never quite feel like home. I would love to move to other parts of Europe but realistically language is a problem although with time you can learn.

What would you do if you were in our position and you would stay in Europe or even the UK? Where would you base yourself and what kind of business would you be thinking of? Our skills are unfortunately quite general but we are not afraid of hard work and we do not aim to be millionaires, we just want a nice life.

If you can afford to live there then Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland are stunningly beautiful. Making a living is a problem and the countryside can be incredibly lonely.

I do have a hankering for the Bristol area - big dynamic city, plenty going on, lots of Arts and countryside all around. The house prices look much more realistic than Wales - I was looking at an IT contract there only this week and am tempted.

I think Bristol would be a good mix if you have children as they get both a modern city and the countryside.

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If you can afford to live there then Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland are stunningly beautiful. Making a living is a problem and the countryside can be incredibly lonely.

I do have a hankering for the Bristol area - big dynamic city, plenty going on, lots of Arts and countryside all around. The house prices look much more realistic than Wales - I was looking at an IT contract there only this week and am tempted.

I think Bristol would be a good mix if you have children as they get both a modern city and the countryside.

I suppose the good thing about contracting is that is allows you to try out a place before deciding if you'd like it there longer term...however, like in most conurbations, and Bristol is particular, the traffic is appalling (it can easily take an hour coming in from Whitchurch to somewhere like Stoke Gifford during rush hour. I find largish cities far too claustrophobic, however going around Exeter last year, I thought it was very nice (I called it big Sherborne (if you've been there))...

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Situation is this. Partner is early 40's and in relatively good employment - long hours though. I am late 30's and at home with three kids under six. We are not unhappy but lacking some challenges and excitement.

Financially we are doing quite well although my partner works in construction which isn't quite stable at the moment. Our perfectly adequate house is paid off and we have a good amount of money in the bank. We are quite happy in the UK but would consider moving abroad. One of us is Dutch by origin but actually we're not excited by the prospect of moving to the Netherlands.

Would you consider buying a business in the UK or abroad and if yes, what? We have construction and marketing skills which aren't terribly useful in hindsight. I feel we are a bit old to re-train so buying an existing business seems an option. But what is a good idea in the current climate?

I'm a civil engineer who's worked on the railway for 15 years and I've just moved to Brisbane for a much better salary than I was getting in the UK, but it could just as easily have been Chile, Brazil, Abu Dhabi or Qatar. I earn more now than what my wife and I earned jointly in the UK.

Plenty of opportunities around the world for your husband.

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I suppose the good thing about contracting is that is allows you to try out a place before deciding if you'd like it there longer term...however, like in most conurbations, and Bristol is particular, the traffic is appalling (it can easily take an hour coming in from Whitchurch to somewhere like Stoke Gifford during rush hour. I find largish cities far too claustrophobic, however going around Exeter last year, I thought it was very nice (I called it big Sherborne (if you've been there))...

Yes, good point - forgot about the traffic nightmare in Bristol.

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I suppose the good thing about contracting is that is allows you to try out a place before deciding if you'd like it there longer term...however, like in most conurbations, and Bristol is particular, the traffic is appalling (it can easily take an hour coming in from Whitchurch to somewhere like Stoke Gifford during rush hour. I find largish cities far too claustrophobic, however going around Exeter last year, I thought it was very nice (I called it big Sherborne (if you've been there))...

hi dave , i live near the old airport at filton, this week the children are on hols , its a different place easy to get to work. it must be all the mums who won,t let the kiddies walk! :angry:

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hi dave , i live near the old airport at filton, this week the children are on hols , its a different place easy to get to work. it must be all the mums who won,t let the kiddies walk! :angry:

A family member used to commute from Somerset into Bristol...they did it for six months. The traffic was fine upto Whitchurch, but after that, it was a complete nightmare with traffic & parking...

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Yes, good point - forgot about the traffic nightmare in Bristol.

dont forget the crime either, Brother in law lives in Bristol and there are lots of places that you wouldnt want to be.

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dont forget the crime either, Brother in law lives in Bristol and there are lots of places that you wouldnt want to be.

Do many people live in Bath and just cycle to work along the track ?

As for the OP ? Dutchies seem to have a liking for Jockland and NZ. Seem to find rather a lot living in these places and starting up businesses. I think it is perhaps the scenery is so different to where they come from.

Somewhere like Aviemore is a great wee place. No idea bout businesses and the rest of it though. Ideally you would be experts in some sort of outside activity.

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Do many people live in Bath and just cycle to work along the track ?

Not sure but judging by the stories I doubt that few would in the darker days of winter.

As for the OP ? Dutchies seem to have a liking for Jockland and NZ. Seem to find rather a lot living in these places and starting up businesses. I think it is perhaps the scenery is so different to where they come from.

Yeah, I like the cloggies. Used to go there quite often for some normality during the 6 years of being posted to germany. Of all europeans I think that we get on best with the dutch. I would live there any day of the week if it wasnt so expensive.

Somewhere like Aviemore is a great wee place. No idea bout businesses and the rest of it though. Ideally you would be experts in some sort of outside activity.

Nice place but seasonal work surely. Great to visit but unless you want to run a b&b or a hiking/ski shop then fk knows what you would do for money.

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Not sure but judging by the stories I doubt that few would in the darker days of winter.

Winter ? Bath and Bristol !! I cycle through the winter in Jockland. A 13 mile commute down a nice cycle track down South would be a breeze :D

Yeah, I like the cloggies. Used to go there quite often for some normality during the 6 years of being posted to germany. Of all europeans I think that we get on best with the dutch. I would live there any day of the week if it wasnt so expensive.

Aye they are pretty sound people in general.

Nice place but seasonal work surely. Great to visit but unless you want to run a b&b or a hiking/ski shop then fk knows what you would do for money.

Recently been very busy in winter and as usual mobbed all summer too. And yes would probably end up doing something like the above. But perhaps that is the sort of thing the OP is looking for after a few decades of the 'career' and with young kids in tow ?

I can imagine worse places to be brought up. Especially if you like outdoors stuff.

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dont forget the crime either, Brother in law lives in Bristol and there are lots of places that you wouldnt want to be.

People say that about every town with a population over 25,000. I've lived in Brixton for years and honestly, it's fine. Unless you are a 15 year old black kid, you are more at risk of being run over by a middle class white commuter than anything else.

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People say that about every town with a population over 25,000. I've lived in Brixton for years and honestly, it's fine. Unless you are a 15 year old black kid, you are more at risk of being run over by a middle class white commuter than anything else.

Maybe but he comes from Reading and never said it about there. Having said that the in laws are well off so he lived in a nice area whereas in Bristol he lives where he can afford. Everywhere has their good bits and bad bits. So long has TMT has plenty of cash and lives in a nice bit then he wont have to dodge the somali gangs.

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I think of this every time I have a bad day at work, which is most days, today included.

My wife and I, early 30s and a 3 year old and we could drop everything and emmigrate to Greece or Australia tomorrow with somewhere to live out there, friends and relatives to help us and even some money to get us started. I don't think either nation has any requirement for the world's worst engineer (me) but my wife grew up in the hospitality industry and has retail experience from the UK. I don't know quite what we would do but I would follow her lead as she is the one far more likely to make a business succeed than I. What stops me is the fear of failure, the fear of isolation somewhere completely different to what I know (they are in far flung outposts of the target nations) and losing the comfort of plodding along as we are now. If I lost the current safety net I would be sorely tempted to say **** it and give it a go as one bonus of being a young(ish) family marginalised by what we call society is that we have very little to lose by putting up 2 fingers to the rest of the world.

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I think of this every time I have a bad day at work, which is most days, today included.

My wife and I, early 30s and a 3 year old and we could drop everything and emmigrate to Greece or Australia tomorrow with somewhere to live out there, friends and relatives to help us and even some money to get us started. I don't think either nation has any requirement for the world's worst engineer (me) but my wife grew up in the hospitality industry and has retail experience from the UK. I don't know quite what we would do but I would follow her lead as she is the one far more likely to make a business succeed than I. What stops me is the fear of failure, the fear of isolation somewhere completely different to what I know (they are in far flung outposts of the target nations) and losing the comfort of plodding along as we are now. If I lost the current safety net I would be sorely tempted to say **** it and give it a go as one bonus of being a young(ish) family marginalised by what we call society is that we have very little to lose by putting up 2 fingers to the rest of the world.

If something isn't a little bit scary - it isn't exciting.

What is the biggest fear ? Missing out on the plod plod plod - or looking back in 10 years thinking '****** I wish I had done it '.

Your situation is a no brainer to me (Easy for me to say of course !!). You can go to these places and already have people there to get you set up. If it all goes tits up after a few years ? Come back home and resume the plod plod plod.

No brainer. Do it. This advice is free. :D

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A family member used to commute from Somerset into Bristol...they did it for six months. The traffic was fine upto Whitchurch, but after that, it was a complete nightmare with traffic & parking...

South of the river or East of the M32 - traffic nightmare. North Bristol isn't much better, but it is better, Cribbs sales not-withstanding. I'd say the same about crime and liveability, but I may just get flamed.

Round the world living? Well, no other way to find out other than to try.

Deepest Africa or South America springs to mind if you have money.

Edit: Bath to Bristol is roughly 9 miles iirc. Fine if you are fit but the cycle-way can get really dark in the winters and I'd not want to risk a predictable commute.

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  • 311 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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