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Good choice....is that with a selespeed gearbox?

Bog standard 6 speed manual. Too much to go wrong with selespeed.

Cars these days are so much better than they used to be. The only thing is self maintenance is nigh on impossible.

Modern cars are generally far, far easier to fix than old ones. In the old days, mechanics were skilled individuals who had to use a lot of knowledge to approach a problem, and a lot of real mechanical skills to do the work. These days there is a nice instruction book, and the tools are simple.

Take a front suspension rebuild. I've recently done an old car: Alfa GTV 1981. This involved pressing parts out of the suspension mountings, very carefully pressing new bushes in, re-assembly, then a quite a while dicking around with shims to get the suspension lined up. Skilled work, lots of opportunity to **** it up. I also rebuilt the front suspension of a friends Alfa 147, 2001. The only tools required were an impact gun, some deep sockets and a big pry bar. All the bits were off and thrown in the bin in 45 minutes, all the new bits on 45 minutes later. No mucking about, no adjustment, all rip and replace. It was totally de-skilled work.

Engine electronics are harder, but all you need is a generic fault code reader and an oscilloscope. The fault code reader tells you that the crank sensor is unhappy, the oscilloscope tells you precisely what is wrong with it (connection, tooth bent, knackered). Replacement is generally easy, but you usually have to give a main dealer £20 to reset the computer. Engine mechanicals are the same as they ever were, just more cams and valves. :lol:

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My theory was that I could buy a 10 year old car with a low mileage (60k miles and FSH) for 1,000 and try to run it for 5 years. My old Rover passed it's MOT last week and is now on its 17th year.

In that time its had brake pads, a couple of bushes, middle and rear exhaust and a couple of oil changes.

I went for a spin in my mate's 'new' 2nd hand car yesterday - a toyota aygo. 2005, 35k on the clock, 1L petrol, 1 owner, really good nick; £3.6k from a small dealer. It does 60mpg and costs £35 in road tax. Ideal for commuting to work and as a runnabout - he calls it his moped with 4 wheels! It has virtually no boot space though. If it's properly maintained and not thrashed on too many long motorway runs (which is isn't designed for) then it could be good for 10 years.

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Let's talk cars? OK.

Durrrrrrrr. Clunk. Brrrrmmmmm!!!!! Brrrrmmmm!

Baaaaaarrrrrrrrrmmm. Clunk. Baaaaaarrrrrrrrrrrrmm!!!! Clunk. Baaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrmmmmmm. Nee-Nah-nee-nah.

You're talking about my Rover aren't you? Well I've had just about enough, next week I'm off out to buy a Daewoo Lacetti.So there....

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Bog standard 6 speed manual. Too much to go wrong with selespeed.

Modern cars are generally far, far easier to fix than old ones. In the old days, mechanics were skilled individuals who had to use a lot of knowledge to approach a problem, and a lot of real mechanical skills to do the work. These days there is a nice instruction book, and the tools are simple.

Take a front suspension rebuild. I've recently done an old car: Alfa GTV 1981. This involved pressing parts out of the suspension mountings, very carefully pressing new bushes in, re-assembly, then a quite a while dicking around with shims to get the suspension lined up. Skilled work, lots of opportunity to **** it up. I also rebuilt the front suspension of a friends Alfa 147, 2001. The only tools required were an impact gun, some deep sockets and a big pry bar. All the bits were off and thrown in the bin in 45 minutes, all the new bits on 45 minutes later. No mucking about, no adjustment, all rip and replace. It was totally de-skilled work.

Engine electronics are harder, but all you need is a generic fault code reader and an oscilloscope. The fault code reader tells you that the crank sensor is unhappy, the oscilloscope tells you precisely what is wrong with it (connection, tooth bent, knackered). Replacement is generally easy, but you usually have to give a main dealer £20 to reset the computer. Engine mechanicals are the same as they ever were, just more cams and valves. :lol:

Disinformation.We have eight grands worth of diagnostic gear and we still end up at the main dealers for about one fault in three.Most charge £50-60 trade.ECU's which often fail run out about £600.If only it was always the crank sensor!

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Not surprised if you used Webuy..they pay about 50% market value,about as good a deal as Cash for Gold

I got £4,300 for a 09 plate C1 VT 1.0 petrol with 12,750 miles on the clock and walked away from the finance agreement 14 months early and £8quid in my pocket.

It was the Citroen dealer that missold my wife the ?GAP insurance, I am meticulous and had I have been there I would have spotted it, the price was fair and the transaction hassle free... looking at auctions as a barometer of true worth I'd have struggled to get £4k for it and then there are fees to consider.

CHF - can I contest the charges retrospectively now I don't own the car as the salesman only told her only about the extra couple if quid on the monthly payment and not the lump at the end?? Thanks.

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Disinformation.We have eight grands worth of diagnostic gear and we still end up at the main dealers for about one fault in three.

Well, it works for me, but I'm only an amateur with a few grand's worth of scope that I know how to use....

Many times it is a sensor or actuator, particularly the intermittent faults.

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Well, it works for me, but I'm only an amateur with a few grand's worth of scope that I know how to use....

Many times it is a sensor or actuator, particularly the intermittent faults.

Impressive stuff rxe, I don't know anybody who's done a suspension rebuild. Water-pump, alternator, oil and sparks are my limits. I am holding out for a double garage as I would like to do loads more and in the warm and dry. Oh for a ceiling-mounted engine winch.

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Honestly, suspension is no different to 30 years ago. The only bits to worry about are the additional wiring: you have to be careful of ABS sensors and the like which don't like getting thumped. Clearly I am talking about "normal" cars, not some high end 7 Series with active ride etc. A decent trolley jack and stands are a must, if the car lands on you it is game over.

We have eight grands worth of diagnostic gear and we still end up at the main dealers for about one fault in three.

I've realised why this is. You're a garage with a paying customer who wants the car at 17:00. I'm quite content to drive around with the scope running in the passenger footwell for a week if need be to track down a fault. My approach probably wouldn't fix the car in the 1 hour that you have - so main dealer makes sense for you.

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You're talking about my Rover aren't you? Well I've had just about enough, next week I'm off out to buy a Daewoo Lacetti.So there....

I have an "06" reg 1.6SX sitting on my forecourt right now.Pretty met blue,41k m iles £2400 to a good home.

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Honestly, suspension is no different to 30 years ago. The only bits to worry about are the additional wiring: you have to be careful of ABS sensors and the like which don't like getting thumped. Clearly I am talking about "normal" cars, not some high end 7 Series with active ride etc. A decent trolley jack and stands are a must, if the car lands on you it is game over.

I've realised why this is. You're a garage with a paying customer who wants the car at 17:00. I'm quite content to drive around with the scope running in the passenger footwell for a week if need be to track down a fault. My approach probably wouldn't fix the car in the 1 hour that you have - so main dealer makes sense for you.

We mainly use it for sales cars.You would be surprised how many people when faced with a niggling fault just trade the car in.It probably works in our favour long term because the majority of faults are fixed for a few quid - like a crank/canm sensor as you mention.

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I have an "06" reg 1.6SX sitting on my forecourt right now.Pretty met blue,41k m iles £2400 to a good home.

Oh!! Bad timing I'm afraid, the Rover has just passed it's MOT so I'm waiting for some major problem before getting rid of it, I just need something to get the wife to her hospital job. The Lacetti would do the job, fancy you having one in stock!

Anyone else on here looking a decent runabout? You could do worse.....

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Oh!! Bad timing I'm afraid, the Rover has just passed it's MOT so I'm waiting for some major problem before getting rid of it, I just need something to get the wife to her hospital job. The Lacetti would do the job, fancy you having one in stock!

Anyone else on here looking a decent runabout? You could do worse.....

Well that's what I thought.Never had one before but when this lady turned up to chop it in I looked up the book and was amazed at just how little it was worth.It doesn't drive that badly and the SX is quite well equipped.I have priced it at £2995 on the front.Not much with low mileage around for that kind of money.

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Not Bangernomics exactly but I have been selling 2006 Focus/Astra Diesels at £3995.These cars are normally in the 80-90k mileage range but as a 2003 example would sell easily for £2k with 120k miles I reckon the cost can be trimmed to about £700 p.a. And bear in mind I am taking almost dead p/exs for a few hundred quid and giving a 3months parts &labour warranty,full MOT and a service.

I was looking at that sort of thing (~2006 1.6TDCi Focus estate.) Are they any good reliability-wise?

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Well that's what I thought.Never had one before but when this lady turned up to chop it in I looked up the book and was amazed at just how little it was worth.It doesn't drive that badly and the SX is quite well equipped.I have priced it at £2995 on the front.Not much with low mileage around for that kind of money.

Profit: What's the book price on the current shape Fiesta Zetec S? Also how much of an effect does the new registration have on used values and how quickly does this happen? Thanks.

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The 1.6TDCi is pretty reliable.It's the Peugot engine as fitted to the 207.Cambelt change is 100k so worth bearing in mind if it's getting close.

Stu: What year/miles?

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Not Bangernomics exactly but I have been selling 2006 Focus/Astra Diesels at £3995.These cars are normally in the 80-90k mileage range but as a 2003 example would sell easily for £2k with 120k miles I reckon the cost can be trimmed to about £700 p.a. And bear in mind I am taking almost dead p/exs for a few hundred quid and giving a 3months parts &labour warranty,full MOT and a service.

Profit

1) - are any of these 12-month warranties from 3rd party providers worth the paper they're written on, or are they so full of exclusions and provisos that no-one ever successfully claims?

2) Also, any advice on avoiding the sexism of car salesmen? Having 3 kids in their twenties and still broke I seem to be buying a lot of runabouts and each time I've been looking I hit the same problem of "I'm afraid the price has to stand, Madam, I've already reduced it by £x00". I think it's not only being female but also the cut-glass accent; on one occasion when I asked a neighbour, who is clearly a local lad, to look at the car the dealer promptly knocked off £400. I supposed I could have then gone down and haggled, but by then I just didn't want to do business with them and bought privately.

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Profit

1) - are any of these 12-month warranties from 3rd party providers worth the paper they're written on, or are they so full of exclusions and provisos that no-one ever successfully claims?

2) Also, any advice on avoiding the sexism of car salesmen? Having 3 kids in their twenties and still broke I seem to be buying a lot of runabouts and each time I've been looking I hit the same problem of "I'm afraid the price has to stand, Madam, I've already reduced it by £x00". I think it's not only being female but also the cut-glass accent; on one occasion when I asked a neighbour, who is clearly a local lad, to look at the car the dealer promptly knocked off £400. I supposed I could have then gone down and haggled, but by then I just didn't want to do business with them and bought privately.

On warranties I agree.I am always being asked for a longer period but I point out that we do our own work and cover everything 100%.These people come in and try to get us to sell their products,how can a warranty for £99 cover anything? Privately is fine but beware,about 90% of private sales are Dicky Dealers.Ask to see the V5 and if it isn't in their name it's a DD."Selling for my uncle who as emigrated to Australia" "partner bought the car and it's too big for her" etc etc

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08/58 20k £8225 trade £9695 retail 09/09 +£350

Wow! Our very own insider!

Thinking of biting the bullet and buying a pre-reg Kia Ceed. 1.6 deisel, although a bit wheezy with only 89bhp on tap. Would be kkeeping it for the full 7 years to get the most out of the warranty.

Thoughts?

p.s. I'm in Scotland, so wont be buying yer Daewoo ;)

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Wow! Our very own insider!

Thinking of biting the bullet and buying a pre-reg Kia Ceed. 1.6 deisel, although a bit wheezy with only 89bhp on tap. Would be kkeeping it for the full 7 years to get the most out of the warranty.

Thoughts?

p.s. I'm in Scotland, so wont be buying yer Daewoo ;)

Actually it's a Chevrolet.Just check the warranty conditions.If they insist on main dealer servicing tell them to stick it.Otherwise probably ok.They should discount if you don't have a trade in.Aim for 10%

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cheapest:

citroen ZX 1.9Diesel. 2 years old bought from auction for 2300 quid. sold 3 years later for 1700 quid.

200 quid a year in depreciation (just simple oil/plug servicing in between, no major works)

most expensive:

Nissan Murano 3.5V6 bought brand new for 20k pounds. sold 2 years later for 10k pounds. OUCH. 5k a year depreciation.

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On warranties I agree.I am always being asked for a longer period but I point out that we do our own work and cover everything 100%.These people come in and try to get us to sell their products,how can a warranty for £99 cover anything? Privately is fine but beware,about 90% of private sales are Dicky Dealers.Ask to see the V5 and if it isn't in their name it's a DD."Selling for my uncle who as emigrated to Australia" "partner bought the car and it's too big for her" etc etc

TAX

want to spot a DD then the tell is TAX

Trade sellers have realised that people wont buy from them anymore because they are a bunch of kuntz so they all hide as private sellers on feebay but if a car has no tax then 99% of the time then it means that they are trade and are flogging something from auction.

Dont touch anything on feebay that has no tax because they are trade sellers, dd's.

If you are willing to risk it then just buy from the auctions, at the end of the day the cars are cheap enough for those maggots to make a profit and it is easier to argue with an auction house than some brown bloke that eats curry and has an immediate family larger than everyone that you have ever known.

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Have to say

I am really having a bad run with feebay and it is well worth considering

in the past i have bought many motors from feebay, no hassle.

but this time, I found one that was well overdue a £750 cam belt, one that kept stalling, one that had tappet issues and sounded like crap and I am awaiting the fourth.....

never have I ever had a bad car from feebay or experienced this before. It may be that the past has gone and feebay is now only an avenue for selling junk and dodgy motors. I think that the scrappage scheme had a lot to answer for.

be careful people, lots of chit bags out there trying to turn around auction junk. If you meet a white seller then please make a not of it and list him on the following site

fukmeawhiteblokesellingacheapdodgycar.com

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  • 314 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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