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Housing Quality

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I don't know about some of you, but in Edinburgh, some of the housing is looking so old an in need of care.... and as for new-builds, they look like they wont last longer than about 60 years! Am I the only one that thinks it is mad for prices to go up on these piles of bricks that may eventually crumble around your ears? How about paying less as time goes on, as in depreciation of a car... thought for the day :D

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I don't know about some of you, but in Edinburgh, some of the housing is looking so old an in need of care.... and as for new-builds, they look like they wont last longer than about 60 years! Am I the only one that thinks it is mad for prices to go up on these piles of bricks that may eventually crumble around your ears? How about paying less as time goes on, as in depreciation of a car... thought for the day :D

I can recall buying a house in Texas back in the early 1990's. It was brick clad and I was quite stunned to see the perfection in brick laying--as I stood along the side of the house and observed the almost perfect alignment of the bricks I was quite amazed. Inside was just as perfect with fabulous crown mouldings, perfect paintwork that was so good that flat surfaces were almost mirror-like. Much of the work was done by Mexicans BTW. About 2300 sq ft. All that for $149k.

IMO our houses are 'orrible hovels that are possibly the smallest living areas in the western world for the amount paid. I am wondering if it is better to buy a German kit gaff provided, of course, you can buy the land.

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I can recall buying a house in Texas back in the early 1990's. It was brick clad and I was quite stunned to see the perfection in brick laying--as I stood along the side of the house and observed the almost perfect alignment of the bricks I was quite amazed. Inside was just as perfect with fabulous crown mouldings, perfect paintwork that was so good that flat surfaces were almost mirror-like. Much of the work was done by Mexicans BTW. About 2300 sq ft. All that for $149k.

IMO our houses are 'orrible hovels that are possibly the smallest living areas in the western world for the amount paid. I am wondering if it is better to buy a German kit gaff provided, of course, you can buy the land.

Mate has just had a German prefab put up, he'll move in at the end of March. Total build time 4-5 months, it would have been quicker but the 50cm of snow we got in early December slowed it up.

It's so much better than 99% of UK houses that there is really no comparison.

5 beds, 3 full bathrooms(2 of them are as big as what passes for a bedroom in the UK), 190m2 plus 90m2 of insulated basement plus 10m2 of non-insulated (for the wine)

triple-glazed argon-filled windows,

double-flow ventilation in all rooms with heat exchanger, underfloor heating, air-water heat pump, solar thermal for hot water. Energy bills will be very low.

Looking at it, it's not Stonehenge but I'd be pretty surprised if it fell down in the next 150 years.

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Our houses since 1945 are crap 'cos they're always built in response to the pressure for 'low-cost' housing. Their value rises when someone does good works on them (e.g. extension, modernisation), and their price goes up when there's a stupid bubble, but on balance they do depreciate when left alone.

A good contrast is German housing since 1945, built to high quality instead of low cost.

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I am wondering if it is better to buy a German kit gaff provided, of course, you can buy the land.

And that's the rub, land with permission is nearly as expensive as a house already built on the plot.

Generally the permission is for a house smaller than I'd want to build.

This is where greasing the palms of planning officers "RocknRolla stylee" is the order of the day, but sadly I don't like to be so connected.

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Am I the only one that thinks it is mad for prices to go up on these piles of bricks that may eventually crumble around your ears? How about paying less as time goes on, as in depreciation of a car... thought for the day :D

That would depends on how much the owner of the building spends on maintaining their property

If they spent enough to keep it in good nick there'd be no need to depreciate. If they didn't spend enough on maintenance then depreciation would be appropriate

Either way, owning a building should be viewed as a cost, same as a car

Ownership of the land underneath the building is a different dance altogether

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That would depends on how much the owner of the building spends on maintaining their property

If they spent enough to keep it in good nick there'd be no need to depreciate. If they didn't spend enough on maintenance then depreciation would be appropriate

Either way, owning a building should be viewed as a cost, same as a car

Ownership of the land underneath the building is a different dance altogether

... when I used to live in NZ, the valuations used for local property taxes specified land and building valuations as two separate elements. I did find myself looking at property prices in a different way as a result of this breakdown

though I'm not sure what happens to NZ land valuations when the country changes shape

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I don't know about some of you, but in Edinburgh, some of the housing is looking so old an in need of care.... and as for new-builds, they look like they wont last longer than about 60 years! Am I the only one that thinks it is mad for prices to go up on these piles of bricks that may eventually crumble around your ears? How about paying less as time goes on, as in depreciation of a car... thought for the day :D

Nick Clegg said before the election that Britain has the worst housing stock of any developed country. I think he is right.

You will probably find the info in this site interesting:

Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE)

Housing standards LINK: http://www.cabe.org.uk/housing/standards

And this sounds spot on:

"Unaffordable housing fables and myths" (Evans, Alan W and Hartwich Oliver Marc - Policy Exchange, 2005)

A study highlighting that Britain has amongst the oldest and pokiest houses in Europe living in crowded and dense cities, not a crowded and urbanised country

Since the 1940s planning blockage has been restricting quality construction in Britain.

.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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I can recall buying a house in Texas back in the early 1990's. It was brick clad and I was quite stunned to see the perfection in brick laying--as I stood along the side of the house and observed the almost perfect alignment of the bricks I was quite amazed. Inside was just as perfect with fabulous crown mouldings, perfect paintwork that was so good that flat surfaces were almost mirror-like. Much of the work was done by Mexicans BTW. About 2300 sq ft. All that for $149k.

IMO our houses are 'orrible hovels that are possibly the smallest living areas in the western world for the amount paid. I am wondering if it is better to buy a German kit gaff provided, of course, you can buy the land planning permit.

Jeezus Christ RB! Precision of language is essential here, to point to the real problem!

To buy land is very very easy! Plenty around in Sussex, at less than £10k/acre! What is virtually impossible is to get a planning permit!!!

.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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Has anyone put an earthquake thread on yet?

not that I can see

I moved out of Christchurch July last year and can't quite believe how badly the city is being knocked around

NZ's got a lot going for it but it's always going to be a case of when, not if, the next major natural disaster strikes the islands. The East coast of South Island is tsunami central and Wellington will be a death trap the next time a major earthquake hits it

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My parents' late 1950s built ex-council house, while not particularly pretty, feels incredibly well built. It, and the other houses around it, may be standing there even after the modern Housing Association homes (built 2005 onwards) have reached the end of their useful life. :)

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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