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Private Sector Doesn't Want Ex-Public Sector Employees

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-12521580

Private firms 'wary of hiring' public sector workers

More than half of private firms would not hire public sector workers who have been made redundant as they do not have the right skills, a survey suggests.

More than half of the 500 companies surveyed by Barclays Corporate and the Financial Times said they planned to create jobs this year.

Three-quarters, though, said they did not think they would create enough to mop up those lost in the public sector.

The government hopes the private sector will offset public sector job cuts.

The Office for Budget Responsibility last November said it expected 330,000 public sector workers to lose their jobs over the next four years but it said the private sector would grow quickly enough to employ all those who had lost their jobs.

The survey found that 57% of companies said they were not interested in former state employees, with 52% saying it was because they believed these workers were "not equipped" for a job in their business.

"I think it's very dangerous, attaching labels to people based on where they've worked - [it] means you're going to miss out on potentially a lot of good hires," Kevin Wall, managing director of Barclays Corporate, told the BBC.

Unemployment figures released last week by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed an increase of 44,000 to almost 2.5 million in the three months to the end of December,

The unemployment rate is now 7.9%, with youth unemployment running at 20.5% - a record high.

Prime Minister David Cameron said unemployment, particularly among the young, was "a matter of great regret".

Most analysts expect unemployment to rise in the coming months, largely because of public sector spending cuts implemented by the government, which are designed to bring down the UK's budget deficit.

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"a matter of great regret".

What a ****

It should be a matter of great urgency to fix. The regret shouldn't be his, he didn't cause it, but he'd better get a move on and fix it.

If you look at greece/tunisia/egypt/libya....it's the young people out protesting

The wealth distribution in the UK has become so unbalanced the young must be incredibly disillusioned. Any young people out there want to comment ?

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Not surprising, if they've spent more than five years in that environment and had no exposure to the private sector they will have become indoctrinated with such a piss poor work ethic and sense of entitlement, as to make them virtually unemployable.

But I thought that the higher echelons of local government were just stuffed with 'talent' who would jump ship to the private sector in an instant if their palms were not crossed with silver and unmentionable-other-copper-group-metals-in-the-lower-portion-of-the-periodic-table?

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But I thought that the higher echelons of local government were just stuffed with 'talent' who would jump ship to the private sector in an instant if their palms were not crossed with silver and unmentionable-other-copper-group-metals-in-the-lower-portion-of-the-periodic-table?

No Fluffy, it turns out they were work-shy chancer inventing jobs for themselves and one another. Had the misfortune to save my company some money after letting one of these ex-public sector project managers go before his probation period had ended. Turns out he didn't know what staying within budget meant.

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But I thought that the higher echelons of local government were just stuffed with 'talent' who would jump ship to the private sector in an instant if their palms were not crossed with silver and unmentionable-other-copper-group-metals-in-the-lower-portion-of-the-periodic-table?

Gosh yes.

And it's a shame that we won't get the chance to find out. :angry:

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The survey found that 57% of companies said they were not interested in former state employees, with 52% saying it was because they believed these workers were "not equipped" too lazy for a job in their business.

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But I thought that the higher echelons of local government were just stuffed with 'talent' who would jump ship to the private sector in an instant if their palms were not crossed with silver and unmentionable-other-copper-group-metals-in-the-lower-portion-of-the-periodic-table?

I'm sure these highly skilled dynamos that are being unleashed into the private sector will be founding the new generation of wealth generating companies - now that they've been released from the shackles of their public sector duties. Or not.

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But I thought that the higher echelons of local government were just stuffed with 'talent' who would jump ship to the private sector in an instant if their palms were not crossed with silver and unmentionable-other-copper-group-metals-in-the-lower-portion-of-the-periodic-table?

Maybe the Uk should just invest more in the 'green economy' to help with the unemployment problem? It worked for Spain...

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It has worked the other way for years with public sector bodies. In previous recessions when the private sectors were on their knees many public sector bodies - who until this recession have not been affected - have had a tendency to look down upon private sector workers trying to get a public sector job.

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Maybe the Uk should just invest more in the 'green economy' to help with the unemployment problem? It worked for Spain...

You mean arrange subsidies so that solar power companies can make money by shining mains-powered lights onto their solar panels?

Or, we could invest in a large scale program to make one of a selection of types of breeder nuclear reactor mass-producible (have a look at http://bravenewclimate.com/ for some discussion), and then roll them out in many cases just by upgrading existing fossil fuelled plant; this would give us a huge new export market, complete energy security and zero GHG emissions, and help the unemployment problem...

But it would annoy virtually everyone, so no need to worry.

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Pretty much ties up with what I heard talking to the owner of out local garage a few weeks back.

Small setup. Himself running the garage and doing the trickier jobs plus a couple of guys working under him and a secretary/receptionist. Don't know what it was that triggered it but he was cursing and fuming about all the red tape he had to comply with, high business rates blah blah blah.... blaming most of it on the local council. He seemed to hate everyone and everything that was linked to the council.

Perhaps it was just the wrong time of the month.

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It has worked the other way for years with public sector bodies. In previous recessions when the private sectors were on their knees many public sector bodies - who until this recession have not been affected - have had a tendency to look down upon private sector workers trying to get a public sector job.

Dunno about other parts of the public sector, but the uni where I work is very positive about applications from the private sector. I'd say half the senior admin staff have private sector experience. Working in HE I have had interviews/job offers with private companies in the past. My experience was that if I fitted the job spec I got the interview. But then, I hve a job that actually needs doing, that would still exist if the unis were private and has a private sector equivalent so that probably helps.

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Last thing we want in these difficult financial conditions is someone who knows about health and safety, environmntal regulations, working time regulations, where the ombudsman lives or who has union representation!

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Dunno about other parts of the public sector, but the uni where I work is very positive about applications from the private sector. I'd say half the senior admin staff have private sector experience. Working in HE I have had interviews/job offers with private companies in the past. My experience was that if I fitted the job spec I got the interview. But then, I hve a job that actually needs doing, that would still exist if the unis were private and has a private sector equivalent so that probably helps.

+1

Work in Uni myself, HR, plenty of private sector people, and plenty of those that leave move to private sector. Same thing, interviews with private companies, and same thing, my area, Reward, very much exists within the private sector. And is one of the few areas of HR that can make cost savings to the paybill without firing people!

As a reward specialist the private sector is ahead in some areas, behind in others.

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I would think that the main issue is that there's not a lot of areas of overlap between the work people do in the private and public sectors. Where there is overlap (e.g. IT), those parts have already been outsourced so the people losing their jobs won't technically be public sector anyway.

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Dunno about other parts of the public sector, but the uni where I work is very positive about applications from the private sector. I'd say half the senior admin staff have private sector experience. Working in HE I have had interviews/job offers with private companies in the past. My experience was that if I fitted the job spec I got the interview. But then, I hve a job that actually needs doing, that would still exist if the unis were private and has a private sector equivalent so that probably helps.

The uni system has always been internally competitive, and predates most governments and certainly predates the modern public sector. It really does not share the labour public sector ethos so far as I can see.

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You mean arrange subsidies so that solar power companies can make money by shining mains-powered lights onto their solar panels?

Or, we could invest in a large scale program to make one of a selection of types of breeder nuclear reactor mass-producible (have a look at http://bravenewclimate.com/ for some discussion), and then roll them out in many cases just by upgrading existing fossil fuelled plant; this would give us a huge new export market, complete energy security and zero GHG emissions, and help the unemployment problem...

But it would annoy virtually everyone, so no need to worry.

That was funny.

They got found out when people realised they were contributing "solar" power in the middle of the night. Can't remember what country it was though.

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That was funny.

They got found out when people realised they were contributing "solar" power in the middle of the night. Can't remember what country it was though.

Why did they do that? Couldn't they just "feed back" the electricity and have pretended there was a solar power generator on the end of it?

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The uni system has always been internally competitive, and predates most governments and certainly predates the modern public sector. It really does not share the labour public sector ethos so far as I can see.

I dunno...I know for a fact one russel group uni employs non-jobbers doing nothing useful. As to what fraction of jobs this is I don't know (could be small I suppose, its just I have seen people have to deal with these people first hand so they definitely exist). OTOH they also have lots of hard workers I see (certainly on the teaching/research side)

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Why did they do that? Couldn't they just "feed back" the electricity and have pretended there was a solar power generator on the end of it?

Actually (having actually looked up the reports) it seems they used diesel generators and wired the output in.. and considering the various efficiencies/subsidies involved, you would need LED lights to have a chance of profitability, so I was probably repeating an urban myth. My bad.

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Last thing we want in these difficult financial conditions is someone who knows about health and safety, environmntal regulations, working time regulations, where the ombudsman lives or who has union representation!

I always think hiring people who have previously worked for an organisation that never existed in the first place is a poor business choice.

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Not surprising, if they've spent more than five years in that environment and had no exposure to the private sector they will have become indoctrinated with such a piss poor work ethic and sense of entitlement, as to make them virtually unemployable.

Do you really belive the private sector is packed full of steely eyed capitalists giving their all for the greater good of the company- :lol:

On the planet I live on private sector companies are just as full of people who have a massively overinflated opinion of their worth and do very little sometimes to justify this assessment. And, as in the public sector, these types tend to multiply as you go further up the hierarchy.

The work ethic was a two way deal that involved loyalty on both sides- how many people now believe their employer would keep them around if there was fraction of increased profit to be made be getting rid of them? Not many.

And as to a sense of entitlement- have you looked at CEO incomes in the last few years?

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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