Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Why You Need To Use Your ‘Environmentally Friendly’ Cotton Carrier Bag 171 Times To Be Green


The Masked Tulip

Recommended Posts

Tough reusable bag that is easier to pack your shopping in.

Or

Crap non biodegradable bag that splits throwing your cornflakes all over the car park.

You decide. I already have and not for green reasons.

The solution here is to pack less into each plastic bag - the additional benefit is that this gives you even more bin liners!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 66
  • Created
  • Last Reply

My local council requires 'black bin' rubbish to be bagged.

Are you suggesting that, rather than reusing carrier bags, I should be purchasing bin liners, which are also made of plastic?

Or do you have a better solution?

I'd be pointing out that additional use of bags is a waste of resources and an uneccesary expense.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be pointing out that additional use of bags is a waste of resources and an uneccesary expense.

OK, let's say I stop using bin bags in my kitchen bin.

Are you going to come and wash it out for me every couple of days?

How do you plan to recycle the water used in this procedure?

Link to post
Share on other sites

MT, The Welsh Assembly commissioned a quashed report on glass recycling. Found the most eco-friendly method of disposal was landfill rather than recycling. Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

I raided neighbors' recycling this morning for wine bottles -- every one found was *washed*. WTF? (other stuff was clean too, yogurt pots, detergent bottles... omg)

Dr. Tarr and Prof.Fether's soothing method appears to have been further refined into daily recycling make-work for the nation.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My local council requires 'black bin' rubbish to be bagged.

Are you suggesting that, rather than reusing carrier bags, I should be purchasing bin liners, which are also made of plastic?

Or do you have a better solution?

I find that the endless supply of "charity" donation plastic bags shoved through my letterbox is more than sufficient to keep me in bin liners. For shopping I've been reusing the same set of (sturdy) plastic bags that I bought 2 years ago.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My local council requies metal and plastic recycling to be washed before putting it out, and they suggest running old yoghurt pots through the dishwasher. This can't be environmentally friendly surely? I tend to rinse everything in cold water and am not sure if I'm helping.

Give our youghurt pots to the dog to clean - he loves them.

I then use said yoghurt pots for plant pots for bringing on seedlings.

Same with the mushroom trays - they are ideal for seeds, or for storage of niknaks around the house.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My local council requies metal and plastic recycling to be washed before putting it out, and they suggest running old yoghurt pots through the dishwasher. This can't be environmentally friendly surely? I tend to rinse everything in cold water and am not sure if I'm helping.

I find it easy enough to rinse recycling in the water left over from washing up stuff that can't go in the dishwasher. Most of my neighbours rinse their recycling too - the ones that don't are a pain in the ****, with their stinking boxes attracting animals which then scatter the rubbish about.

Link to post
Share on other sites

MT, The Welsh Assembly commissioned a quashed report on glass recycling. Found the most eco-friendly method of disposal was landfill rather than recycling. Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

I'd like to see some evidence of that. Is it not true that it requires a lot more energy to make glass from sand than it does to make it out of old glass?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to see some evidence of that. Is it not true that it requires a lot more energy to make glass from sand than it does to make it out of old glass?

Google for the report?

In general:

1. most glass has wildly varying coefficient of expansion. In other words, it cannot be mixed and must be sorted apart on pain of destroying entire batches.

2. contamination is the enemy of functioning glass and not everything burns off when it's heated to glass' melting point. .

3. Glass itself is cheap, sorting, washing cost as much as the raw material (if not more) itself.

4. The real expense of glass production is the heat and the labour that is involved.

5. Recycled glass is of low quality (by definition) and so has limited uses.

6. Glass is inert, it breaks down to sand over time (duh) and really other than being bulky and ugly, not really a problem for the planet.

7. PET is far better in almost all respects than glass for food storage. It's light, doesn't maim people when it breaks and it can be burnt for energy at the end of it's life cycle.

People using drinking water or the dishwasher to wash recycling is madness -- and the life time that is wasted on this pointless ritual a sad thing to behold.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My local council requires 'black bin' rubbish to be bagged.

Are you suggesting that, rather than reusing carrier bags, I should be purchasing bin liners, which are also made of plastic?

We re-use our shopping bags as bin liners.

My logic is the same as yours..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Google for the report?

In general:

1. most glass has wildly varying coefficient of expansion. In other words, it cannot be mixed and must be sorted apart on pain of destroying entire batches.

2. contamination is the enemy of functioning glass and not everything burns off when it's heated to glass' melting point. .

3. Glass itself is cheap, sorting, washing cost as much as the raw material (if not more) itself.

4. The real expense of glass production is the heat and the labour that is involved.

5. Recycled glass is of low quality (by definition) and so has limited uses.

6. Glass is inert, it breaks down to sand over time (duh) and really other than being bulky and ugly, not really a problem for the planet.

7. PET is far better in almost all respects than glass for food storage. It's light, doesn't maim people when it breaks and it can be burnt for energy at the end of it's life cycle.

People using drinking water or the dishwasher to wash recycling is madness -- and the life time that is wasted on this pointless ritual a sad thing to behold.

Why the hell should I google for the report? It's up to the person making the assertions to justify them. And how about some references to back up your assertions (not that I dispute all of them)?

As I said, it's easy to rinse recycling in the water left over from washing up. A few seconds, and no water wasted. As for the waste of life, I suppose you consider people who, for example, use litter bins to be deluded fools too?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why the hell should I google for the report? It's up to the person making the assertions to justify them. And how about some references to back up your assertions (not that I dispute all of them)?

As I said, it's easy to rinse recycling in the water left over from washing up. A few seconds, and no water wasted. As for the waste of life, I suppose you consider people who, for example, use litter bins to be deluded fools too?

It's no big deal with quickly grab the report and read what you dispute, unless you want to be obstinate about it... =)

And, how about you check on your assumptions before you ask silly questions about long established facts? And why so aggressive, seems like you want an argument rather than a discussion -- I typed this stuff to inform you, not to rile you.

And no, I don't think that people are fools for wanting to help out, but I hate the idea that their sincere efforts along with their time and money are wasted pointlessly. And I do blame the VI 'experts' who should know better and who deliberately mislead people.

Using litter bins is useful since it allows the simple handling of said litter. Other than that, if it's a big communal bin that gets lifted mechanically, it of course does not matter how you chuck it.

Btw, using a dishwasher is far more 'environmentally friendly' than washing by hand, and the recycling company washes is anyway, so you're wasting your time and money here, plus, you're damaging the environment with your green habits.

So relax, choose PET when you can, throw your stuff out unwashed and get a dishwasher.

And enjoy the extra free time that you don't need to waste on doing pointless work.

EDIT: Btw, it just occurred to me: washing out extra stuff also puts a lot of pressure on the waste water system. Not a lot per individual, but every little harms when multiplied millions of times.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's no big deal with quickly grab the report and read what you dispute, unless you want to be obstinate about it... =)

And, how about you check on your assumptions before you ask silly questions about long established facts? And why so aggressive, seems like you want an argument rather than a discussion -- I typed this stuff to inform you, not to rile you.

And no, I don't think that people are fools for wanting to help out, but I hate the idea that their sincere efforts along with their time and money are wasted pointlessly. And I do blame the VI 'experts' who should know better and who deliberately mislead people.

Using litter bins is useful since it allows the simple handling of said litter. Other than that, if it's a big communal bin that gets lifted mechanically, it of course does not matter how you chuck it.

Btw, using a dishwasher is far more 'environmentally friendly' than washing by hand, and the recycling company washes is anyway, so you're wasting your time and money here, plus, you're damaging the environment with your green habits.

So relax, choose PET when you can, throw your stuff out unwashed and get a dishwasher.

And enjoy the extra free time that you don't need to waste on doing pointless work.

I assume from the fact that you haven't provided any links that this report doesn't actually exist and that your assertions are equally specious. So no, I won't be putting out my recycling unrinsed for animals to scatter about and make a mess of my neighbourhood. Luckily, most of my neighbours are more considerate than you.

And if you bothered reading my posts before replying, you'd see that I have got a dishwasher.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's no big deal with quickly grab the report and read what you dispute, unless you want to be obstinate about it... =)

And, how about you check on your assumptions before you ask silly questions about long established facts? And why so aggressive, seems like you want an argument rather than a discussion -- I typed this stuff to inform you, not to rile you.

And no, I don't think that people are fools for wanting to help out, but I hate the idea that their sincere efforts along with their time and money are wasted pointlessly. And I do blame the VI 'experts' who should know better and who deliberately mislead people.

Using litter bins is useful since it allows the simple handling of said litter. Other than that, if it's a big communal bin that gets lifted mechanically, it of course does not matter how you chuck it.

Btw, using a dishwasher is far more 'environmentally friendly' than washing by hand, and the recycling company washes is anyway, so you're wasting your time and money here, plus, you're damaging the environment with your green habits.

So relax, choose PET when you can, throw your stuff out unwashed and get a dishwasher.

And enjoy the extra free time that you don't need to waste on doing pointless work.

EDIT: Btw, it just occurred to me: washing out extra stuff also puts a lot of pressure on the waste water system. Not a lot per individual, but every little harms when multiplied millions of times.

But you can use glass jars again and again, if you make your own jams, chutneys, etc. Glass jars also have lots of uses around the house - storing screws, buttons, etc.

Recycling is only the second choice in the "environmentally friendly" hierarchy - Reusing comes above recycling.

Link to post
Share on other sites

But you can use glass jars again and again, if you make your own jams, chutneys, etc. Glass jars also have lots of uses around the house - storing screws, buttons, etc.

Recycling is only the second choice in the "environmentally friendly" hierarchy - Reusing comes above recycling.

Absolutely. I lived in Germany for 10 years, and over there they reuse bottles extensively. But they also recycle glass containers that can't be reused.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I assume from the fact that you haven't provided any links that this report doesn't actually exist and that your assertions are equally specious. So no, I won't be putting out my recycling unrinsed for animals to scatter about and make a mess of my neighbourhood. Luckily, most of my neighbours are more considerate than you.

And if you bothered reading my posts before replying, you'd see that I have got a dishwasher.

As the saying goes: To assume maketh an ASS outta U and ME :)

I don't have to provide links, you were the person who is curious, and then curiously unhappy to be informed -- we can't do the thinking for you, and if you google yourself you get a far better overview of the varying opinions than if you demand to be spoon fed with links. As they say: reality will set you free(or so), if only unchain from from your sink in your case.

Btw, always use sturdy bins that close properly if you have animals around that scavenge. If only to prevent them from hurting themselves or getting poisoned/trapped by your rubbish, and to not harass your neighbors' perfect lawn with your clean refuse.

Link to post
Share on other sites

But you can use glass jars again and again, if you make your own jams, chutneys, etc. Glass jars also have lots of uses around the house - storing screws, buttons, etc.

Recycling is only the second choice in the "environmentally friendly" hierarchy - Reusing comes above recycling.

That is true... note, I was scavenging for wine bottles as I make my own wine and beer =) Doing that is far more environmentally friendly than any hand washing of litter I could do(if it were not a criminal waste in the first place)..

However, fact is, lots of jars are NOT used ever again, and often the glue of the label is no longer designed to be removed easily either, so product security reasons etc. And there is a limit to how good the jar top holds up, most of those seals are only good the first time they get applied in the factory. So, if you're canning in those jars... be careful. WECK has many good reasons why they design their canning glasses so that you will never fail to notice an open jar.

PET really is a great packaging material (and it's ok for most brewing as well!).

Link to post
Share on other sites

As the saying goes: To assume maketh an ASS outta U and ME :)

I don't have to provide links, you were the person who is curious, and then curiously unhappy to be informed -- we can't do the thinking for you, and if you google yourself you get a far better overview of the varying opinions than if you demand to be spoon fed with links. As they say: reality will set you free(or so), if only unchain from from your sink in your case.

Btw, always use sturdy bins that close properly if you have animals around that scavenge. If only to prevent them from hurting themselves or getting poisoned/trapped by your rubbish, and to not harass your neighbors' perfect lawn with your clean refuse.

I have found large amounts of plausible-sounding information on the internet explaining why glass recycling is worthwhile (compared with making glass from scratch) and, so far, nothing claiming that it isn't. If you are unable to provide any information to back up your claims, I can only conclude that you are simply talking ********.

Edit: Of course, reusing is better, and using plastic bottles may be better than using glass. I don't dispute that.

Edit: Our council, in all its wisdom, has decreed that our recycling boxes do not have lids.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.