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The Masked Tulip

Why You Need To Use Your ‘Environmentally Friendly’ Cotton Carrier Bag 171 Times To Be Green

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This needs to go in off-topic but it deserves even 5 minutes in the main forum.

Why you need to use your ‘environmentally friendly’ cotton carrier bag 171 times to be green

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1358885/Why-need-use-environmentally-friendly-cotton-carrier-bag-171-times-green.html#ixzz1EX9rwqRn

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This needs to go in off-topic but it deserves even 5 minutes in the main forum.

Why you need to use your ‘environmentally friendly’ cotton carrier bag 171 times to be green

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1358885/Why-need-use-environmentally-friendly-cotton-carrier-bag-171-times-green.html#ixzz1EX9rwqRn

Just another piece of the CO2 focussed madness.

The thing about cotton is that it doesn't become a long lived part of the great pacific garbage vortex.

I'd be happy to make a little more CO2 to use something more biodegradable than a plastic bag.

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Surely cotton has to be better all round.

As a kid we had a family shopping bag. Heck, we even kept the one egg box and took it back for refills time and time again until it wore out.

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Using a thin plastic bag equates to generating 1.57kg of carbon dioxide.

Don't believe that number.

Me neither.

They're saying it equates to about the weight of food you could normally carry in a thin plastic bag. If that's the case every time a thin plastic bag goes out of the shop the CO2 generated, contents and all, must be a power stations worth.

So a single cotton bag produces 171x1.57kg of CO2 = getting on for 1/3rd of a tonne of CO2. GLOBAL WARMING ALERT!!!

The whole article is a total stretch - to say the very least. Worthy of a Daily Mash special report.

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This needs to go in off-topic but it deserves even 5 minutes in the main forum.

Why you need to use your ‘environmentally friendly’ cotton carrier bag 171 times to be green

Like everyone else, I don't use them to protect the environment, I use them because they don't fall apart while I'm halfway accross the carpark with heavy shopping.

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Using a thin plastic bag equates to generating 1.57kg of carbon dioxide.

Don't believe that number.

That number is preposterous.

A typical thin film plastic carrier bag as used by the major supermarkets, as their standard bags, weighs about 8 grams. Typically you need petroleum equal to 2x the film weight to manufacture it. From there, CO2 emissions are about 3x the weight of the fuel source. (We'll ignore transportation energy costs, as bulk transport is so energy efficient that its costs are negligible).

So, 1 typical carrier bag produces around 50 grams of CO2 - slightly more if you include transportation and disposal costs.

Of course, that's for a thin film bag - one of the heavy duty, large 'bag for life' type bags is a very different story. These are much heavier - and I'd easily believe 10-20x the weight, which make the figure of 1.57 kg pretty reasonable.

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OK, what's the problem, I probably have used each of my 'bags for life' far more than 171 times.

Um, yes. And I prefer them anyway for the strength reason noted.

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Like everyone else, I don't use them to protect the environment, I use them because they don't fall apart while I'm halfway accross the carpark with heavy shopping.

+1 The plastic bags of late are useless, really thin.

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+1 The plastic bags of late are useless, really thin.

need to double bag a box of cornflakes.....A: the handles stretch and B: the corners penetrate the bag.

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"Bag for life" is pointless when you look at the packaging of the other items you get. What percentage of the landfill is from plastic bags, compared to, say, meat packaging?

At least you can recycle the plastic bags around the house.

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"Bag for life" is pointless when you look at the packaging of the other items you get. What percentage of the landfill is from plastic bags, compared to, say, meat packaging?

At least you can recycle the plastic bags around the house.

good point....although maybe we'd be better of adding meat sticks in the form of Bankers and Political associates to the landfill.

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I wish I could convince everyone that "reusing" a plastic bag as a bin bag isn't actually useful.

We have a series of bags for life from various supermarkets ... it's only tesco that replace them free when they wear out though...

Making a cotton bag from an old piece of cotton clothing is probably more sensible than buying a specific bag. There was one village where they made loads of them and gave them away to get rid of carrier bags.

One of our poundshops charges 1p for bags.

The stats about CO on bags seem to be irrelevant.

Carry that 1 cotton bag with you every where and you'll probably use it a couple of times a week... so it'll be sorted in a year... The same plastic thin bag isn't going to be up to that sort of use.

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Like everyone else, I don't use them to protect the environment, I use them because they don't fall apart while I'm halfway accross the carpark with heavy shopping.

I take the trolley to the car.

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MT, The Welsh Assembly commissioned a quashed report on glass recycling. Found the most eco-friendly method of disposal was landfill rather than recycling. Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

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Anyone have any real numbers on this stuff?

I do most of my shopping unplanned. If I'm passing a shop, I'll buy a couple of plastic bags full of shopping and walk home. Surely this is better than driving the car there with bags for life in the boot?

On the biodegrading thing. If you bury something in the ground do you care if it degrades or not. In fact, isn't it better if it doesn't?

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This needs to go in off-topic but it deserves even 5 minutes in the main forum.

Why you need to use your ‘environmentally friendly’ cotton carrier bag 171 times to be green

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1358885/Why-need-use-environmentally-friendly-cotton-carrier-bag-171-times-green.html#ixzz1EX9rwqRn

A similar "mistake" is ignoring that heat from incandescent light bulbs is not a "waste" in Britain for at least 3/4 of the year.

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A similar "mistake" is ignoring that heat from incandescent light bulbs is not a "waste" in Britain for at least 3/4 of the year.

If you huddle round a lightbbulb maybe. But heat rises in Britain for at least 4/4 of the year.

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Why not?

You use it only once. It's the same as throwing it away after one use.

Reusing it should involve using it many times until it wears out.

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Tough reusable bag that is easier to pack your shopping in.

Or

Crap non biodegradable bag that splits throwing your cornflakes all over the car park.

You decide. I already have and not for green reasons.

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You use it only once. It's the same as throwing it away after one use.

Reusing it should involve using it many times until it wears out.

My local council requires 'black bin' rubbish to be bagged.

Are you suggesting that, rather than reusing carrier bags, I should be purchasing bin liners, which are also made of plastic?

Or do you have a better solution?

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If you huddle round a lightbbulb maybe. But heat rises in Britain for at least 4/4 of the year.

And air also circulates for (exactly) 4/4 of the year.

This heat argument is not mine. It is well known. And generally accepted as correct.

Yours is a different argument: insulation.

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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