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How The Young Can Resist

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A common denominator in the plan of public servants on very generous pensions, boomers who made stupid gains on their houses, bankers with their loans..

Is that the younger generations will have to work and produce wealth for decades, while all those people will take the vast majority of that production for themselves. It is all essentially promises to pay themselves based on the future production of young people. Pensions are numbers in an actuaries account right now, housing equity is on paper.

That young person working hard at Tescos for neo-slave wages.. supports a whole host of parasites who are making money off their labour. From the shareholders in the company, to the sales taxes, property taxes, fees and so on that go to support wealthy government workers, to the bankers loans to Tescos.

My advice to young people is simply drop out, unless they really make it worth your while to go into work. And not promises of maybe future good opportunities, or good pensions 30 years from now.. I am talking some real money on the table - today. Otherwise go on benefits, have a bunch of children, enjoy life, like public parks, friends, time with the children. In 100 years no one is going to care less if a young woman was an assistant manager at some douche bag company.. but her great grand children will remember her.

This attitude of demanding to make it worth my while, or I take my ball home has served me well in life. Its the opposite of the beta-desperation-pity attitude.

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All very well if you are young and single with no kids or responsibilities - so that already eliminates this option for many. If you have any sort of stake in society, especially a mortgage then this option just isn't on either. But therein lies the sense of what you're saying, as more first time buyers are excluded from mortgages this pool of malcontents increases. Basically, you're talking about youngsters turning into hippies, so back to the sixties - free love and drugs. Doesn't sound at all bad to me.

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A common denominator in the plan of public servants on very generous pensions, boomers who made stupid gains on their houses, bankers with their loans..

Is that the younger generations will have to work and produce wealth for decades, while all those people will take the vast majority of that production for themselves. It is all essentially promises to pay themselves based on the future production of young people. Pensions are numbers in an actuaries account right now, housing equity is on paper.

That young person working hard at Tescos for neo-slave wages.. supports a whole host of parasites who are making money off their labour. From the shareholders in the company, to the sales taxes, property taxes, fees and so on that go to support wealthy government workers, to the bankers loans to Tescos.

My advice to young people is simply drop out, unless they really make it worth your while to go into work. And not promises of maybe future good opportunities, or good pensions 30 years from now.. I am talking some real money on the table - today. Otherwise go on benefits, have a bunch of children, enjoy life, like public parks, friends, time with the children. In 100 years no one is going to care less if a young woman was an assistant manager at some douche bag company.. but her great grand children will remember her.

This attitude of demanding to make it worth my while, or I take my ball home has served me well in life. Its the opposite of the beta-desperation-pity attitude.

Totally agree, and that's basically what I've done. I dumped the high stress, long hours and what I thought was a good wage for time with the kids and a modest living from traditional woodcraft and blacksmithing. Never been happier.

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My advice to young people is simply drop out,

Taking your cue from the hippy generation. The ones born around the later 1940s and now approaching retirement with much-diminished pension pots ...

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All very well if you are young and single with no kids or responsibilities - so that already eliminates this option for many. If you have any sort of stake in society, especially a mortgage then this option just isn't on either. But therein lies the sense of what you're saying, as more first time buyers are excluded from mortgages this pool of malcontents increases. Basically, you're talking about youngsters turning into hippies, so back to the sixties - free love and drugs. Doesn't sound at all bad to me.

I am hopeful on the free love part. A lot of what keeps women controlled is needing a home and money to support children. But if that is coming from the state anyway, women are free to sleep around, have children with different men.. and generally be more open and emotionally and sexually engaged with the community.

A lot of the drudgery work of the last century really was soul crushing too. Like working in a repittious task, or being desky jockey, form filer and copier, 40 hours a week, is painful. Luckily today we have industrial automation to do those tasks, and computers can handle the filing.

The people with substantial equity in their house, 20 years into a pension they hope will be there, and a barely above slave wages income that keeps them on the wheel running.. they are controlled, but in fairness to them the powers that be are making it just worth their while.

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Totally agree, and that's basically what I've done. I dumped the high stress, long hours and what I thought was a good wage for time with the kids and a modest living from traditional woodcraft and blacksmithing. Never been happier.

Good move.. I wouldn't be surprised as your creativity emerges in your passion of traditional craftsmanship and you get a reputation that you end up making more money anyway.

But even if you just live modestly, its better to be stress free, have tons of time to go to parks and be with your kids, heck just have time to relax and think.

I see quite a few people who make huge money, have a very expensive home, a second vacation home, nice cars, with insurance and payments on all of them, .. and it honestly doesn't seem they are living better than someone on welfare.

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My advice to young people is simply drop out, unless they really make it worth your while to go into work. And not promises of maybe future good opportunities, or good pensions 30 years from now.. I am talking some real money on the table - today. Otherwise go on benefits, have a bunch of children, enjoy life, like public parks, friends, time with the children.

Absolute drivel. This is simply cutting off ones nose to spite ones face, and besides there won't be any benefits if everyone takes your "advice".

In 100 years no one is going to care less if a young woman was an assistant manager at some douche bag company.. but her great grand children will remember her.

They'll remember she was a work-shy drop out living on benefits. "Ooh, let's go to the park! But we'll have to get the bus because I can't afford a car, we can't have an ice cream because my JSA doesn't extend to that, and yes it's the park again because everywhere else costs money". Thanks Granny.

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Simply to live depends upon the hard work of others.

People have to grow and prepare the food you eat, build the computers/ TVs/ phones you use, extract the oil you use etc. By not doing any work, you are abusing their contribution to society. If no one works, we will all starve quite quickly.

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Simply to live depends upon the hard work of others.

People have to grow and prepare the food you eat, build the computers/ TVs/ phones you use, extract the oil you use etc. By not doing any work, you are abusing their contribution to society. If no one works, we will all starve quite quickly.

Apparently an average farmer in America feeds 120 people. I'm no expert but I bet advanced factories in places like Germany and Japan could produce most of your technology needs with minimal labour input. Oil is a different story, but not because it is labour intensive.

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I am hopeful on the free love part. A lot of what keeps women controlled is needing a home and money to support children. But if that is coming from the state anyway, women are free to sleep around, have children with different men.. and generally be more open and emotionally and sexually engaged with the community.

That's a good one - might fwd it to Labour's policy dept: 'More women on benefits, please, so I can find more to sh*g!'

Do you work for a council BTW? Your last bit sounds like something from one of their job descriptions.Just needs 'ethnically diverse' between 'the' and 'community'.

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I have no problem with this.

Between contracts, I work in the minimum wage sector because it makes sense for ME.

It's very insecure. Nothing like turning out for a bin round at 5:45am thinking you have work for the whole week to get sent home because your crew has been allocated a foreigner for the day. I don't blame the immigrant, I blame the hostile way this country has been managed to the detriment of native workers.

The last thing I need is forced competition from people who would otherwise stay happily at home, and I don't mind my taxes paying for this. I get to work, and in my case it's worth doing.

Let the authorities find work for those of us that want work, and leave the rest alone.

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Really I think young people are fcked whatever they do. Some of us older ones can make an adjustment, the wife and I have set ourselves up pretty well inspite of the fact that I only work part-time.

We have everything thing we need to live a simple life, a council house + the money to buy straight out. We have two old cars, furniture either bought on ebay, or online, more shoes than Emelda....even food from the garden. Dropping out is easy AFTER you've set yourself up!

And what do young people have? Student debt mainly.

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My advice to young people is simply drop out, unless they really make it worth your while to go into work. And not promises of maybe future good opportunities, or good pensions 30 years from now.. I am talking some real money on the table - today. Otherwise go on benefits, have a bunch of children, enjoy life, like public parks, friends, time with the children. In 100 years no one is going to care less if a young woman was an assistant manager at some douche bag company.. but her great grand children will remember her.

Do you honestly think living a life on benefits with 4 kids would be "enjoyable"? Spending all your time changing nappies, praying that the next government doesn't cut your benefits?

I dumped the high stress, long hours and what I thought was a good wage for time with the kids and a modest living from traditional woodcraft and blacksmithing. Never been happier.

That's more like it - an enjoyable, low stress JOB.

Money doesn't buy happiness, but benefits certainly doesn't either!

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A common denominator in the plan of public servants on very generous pensions, boomers who made stupid gains on their houses, bankers with their loans..

Is that the younger generations will have to work and produce wealth for decades, while all those people will take the vast majority of that production for themselves. It is all essentially promises to pay themselves based on the future production of young people. Pensions are numbers in an actuaries account right now, housing equity is on paper.

That young person working hard at Tescos for neo-slave wages.. supports a whole host of parasites who are making money off their labour. From the shareholders in the company, to the sales taxes, property taxes, fees and so on that go to support wealthy government workers, to the bankers loans to Tescos.

My advice to young people is simply drop out, unless they really make it worth your while to go into work. And not promises of maybe future good opportunities, or good pensions 30 years from now.. I am talking some real money on the table - today. Otherwise go on benefits, have a bunch of children, enjoy life, like public parks, friends, time with the children. In 100 years no one is going to care less if a young woman was an assistant manager at some douche bag company.. but her great grand children will remember her.

This attitude of demanding to make it worth my while, or I take my ball home has served me well in life. Its the opposite of the beta-desperation-pity attitude.

I am 23 years old.

I was on benefits for a few months a while ago. I don't think you have ever been on JSA and had to queue up in the rain with all the chavs then face some jumped-up tosser of an interviewer who probably got beaten up a lot in high school and now enjoys taking it out on the unemployed, otherwise you wouldn't have made that post.

No ******ing way am I ever going back on them... you basically get treated like a piece of trash, you have your benefits cut and withdrawn for arbitrary and petty reasons. You receive random phone calls early in the morning asking you a ton of personal questions which get recorded and put on your file.. it's psychological terrorism designed to make the unemployed feel as miserable as possible. As if they didn't have enough problems already with our ******** Daily Mail culture resulting in the popular opinion of "no job = you are scum".

You have to practically beg and grovel to get any money from the government, and even then you can expect to wait weeks or months for them to bother to respond to you while you starve.

What the fucking HELL are you smoking?

Life on benefits is fucking SHIT. Especially if you're under 24 and only get £50 JSA instead of £67.50.

Edited by DementedTuna

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Otherwise go on benefits, have a bunch of children, enjoy life, like public parks, friends, time with the children. In 100 years no one is going to care less if a young woman was an assistant manager at some douche bag company.. but her great grand children will remember her.

Enjoy what? intense boredom , declining health because of watching too much daytime TV and eating too much junk and a feeling of worthlessness because you don't work or contribute?

The amount Brown paid to bail out the banks would have paid pensions for years and years , 1 trillion pounds goes a long way.

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Dropping out is easy AFTER you've set yourself up!

Exactly.

I don't much admire the "hard working" element who keep putting in the hours attempting to satisfy their insatiable wants and avoid their vacuous lives. Like the lottery winners who keep up their jobs. Sad.

There is not any great moral principle involved where someone who doesn't need a job deprives someone who does.

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Exactly.

I don't much admire the "hard working" element who keep putting in the hours attempting to satisfy their insatiable wants and avoid their vacuous lives. Like the lottery winners who keep up their jobs. Sad.

There is not any great moral principle involved where someone who doesn't need a job deprives someone who does.

Might as well jump on the benny while you can, if you can, after all who thinks it's still going to be there in a decades time?

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Injin, I would rather work in a min-wage job for 2 days per week, than have to go down to the job centre and deal with their government shit once a week, and grovel like some sort of whimpering dog for the honour of being granted barely enough money to survive.

Going on benefits is not freedom, it's slavery. Even more so than work.

Edited by DementedTuna

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Might as well jump on the benny while you can, if you can, after all who thinks it's still going to be there in a decades time?

As stated in my earlier post, between properly paying work, benefits make no sense for me.

For some they do, and i am quite happy to pay the competition to stay at home.

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Really I think young people are fcked whatever they do. Some of us older ones can make an adjustment, the wife and I have set ourselves up pretty well inspite of the fact that I only work part-time.

We have everything thing we need to live a simple life, a council house + the money to buy straight out. We have two old cars, furniture either bought on ebay, or online, more shoes than Emelda....even food from the garden. Dropping out is easy AFTER you've set yourself up!

And what do young people have? Student debt mainly.

Bingo! Go to the top of the class ;)

Clearing your debts, minimising expenses and ensuring you've got a regular income stream and savings are very sensible insurance policies if you're going down aa3's route. Just flinging yourself into the arms of the state leaves you with zero leverage, not a nice place to be.

Edited by Chef

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Injin, I would rather work in a min-wage job for 2 days per week, than have to go down to the job centre and deal with their government shit once a week, and grovel like some sort of whimpering dog for the honour of being granted barely enough money to survive.

Going on benefits is not freedom, it's slavery. Even more so than work.

Me too, definately.

But in fairness I have no rent to pay and when I have been obliged to sign on back in the daze, I was generally treated ok.

Some individuals in the System, usually women in my experience, will go out of their way to treat people like **** just because they can,

but his did not seem to be a norm.

Anyway, good to hear from someone who has lived a little rather than some of the smug complacent types on here who have spent their lives in the bubble.

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Clearing your debts, minimising expenses and ensuring you've got a regular income stream and savings are very sensible insurance policies of you're going down aa3's route. Just flinging yourself into the arms of the state leaves you with zero leverage, not a nice place to be.

Yep.

My guess is that the introduction of Universal Credit in 2013 will be a key moment.

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Bingo! Go to the top of the class ;)

Clearing your debts, minimising expenses and ensuring you've got a regular income stream and savings are very sensible insurance policies of you're going down aa3's route. Just flinging yourself into the arms of the state leaves you with zero leverage, not a nice place to be.

That is like the icing of future enslavement. The real core 'life' for anyone in their teens to late 20s is aspiration. They have been sat in front of a screen since childhood looking at a bullshite visual festival of celebrity derived shows. They largely aspire to have that house on Cribs, that lifestyle of some vacuous non talent fecker with all the trappings. It is said they don't even aspire to be talented at anything.

I am 31 and used to be gutted i was born a few years too late with regard to housing. No i am just grateful i wasn't born 5 or so years earlier. That and future generations have got nothing but the TV celebrity induced consumption that leads them into a life time of debt enslavement.

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Simply to live depends upon the hard work of others.

People have to grow and prepare the food you eat, build the computers/ TVs/ phones you use, extract the oil you use etc. By not doing any work, you are abusing their contribution to society. If no one works, we will all starve quite quickly.

....agree, but what many people do is work hard from age 20's to 60's or even 70's in jobs they dislike....then die with over work and stress, or they are too old and unhealthy to do what they could have done if they were that bit younger....the way to go is put some balance into your life, work hard to make some money to get by, then take time away to do something completely different....what many fear is change, they fear risk, they fear poverty, they fear their own capability to succeed without job security.......many do boring, stressful unsatisfying work simply because they lack the courage of their convictions to change anything........ ;)

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...what many fear is change, they fear risk, they fear poverty, they fear their own capability to succeed without job security.......many do boring, stressful unsatisfying work simply because they lack the courage of their convictions to change anything........ ;)

And some succeed because they lack the sense and perspective to see the dangers.

An old mate jacked in two training schemes, (catering and car mechanics) at sixteen and dossed until he was twenty.

Now he is probably a millionaire even after deducting his debts. (Has a proper productive business but also BTL)

He didn't see any pitfalls, still doesn't, and guess what. For him and a million others there weren't any.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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