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Price Per Square Metre

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Where I live (Geneva), for houses it's 10k GBP per square metre, that's an average, the expensive areas are much more. Apartments 9k per m2.

This seems excessive and even with 10-year fixes at 3% interest available buying is out of the question.

How much where you live?

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Where I live (Geneva), for houses it's 10k GBP per square metre, that's an average, the expensive areas are much more. Apartments 9k per m2.

This seems excessive and even with 10-year fixes at 3% interest available buying is out of the question.

How much where you live?

Gibraltar Apartments are about:

£1500sqm for ex government (25 year residency)

£3000sqm for shared ownership or full ownership in shared ownership blocks (3 year residency)

£5500sqm for private housing stock

£7500sqm for premium (marina penthouses) housing stock.

Houses start at £6000 sqm up to £20,000 sqm as there is very restricted land.

Edited by Nautorius

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Where I live (Geneva), for houses it's 10k GBP per square metre, that's an average, the expensive areas are much more. Apartments 9k per m2.

This seems excessive and even with 10-year fixes at 3% interest available buying is out of the question.

How much where you live?

West Sussex: from £2,000/sqm (council estates) to £5,000/sqm (Chichester, inside city walls).

EDIT: Construction costs in Britain are just about £1,000/sqm. But plots with planning consent are extremely rare, and consequently unaffordable.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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Romsey, Hampshire @£3,200 / m^2 for a decent edwardian terrace at the asking price.

But I think that around £2,750/m^2 would be a realistic paid price, but give it another couple of monthes...

Edited by Orbster123

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Leipaja Latvia 50-300 GBPper sqm for apartment apartments range between 2000 gbp for one in poor condition to 20,000GBP for a 4 bed in city centre

for a house approx 200GBP per sqm

Agricultural land can be bought for as low as 0.03p per sqm

http://www.ss.lv/

the area that im in is called Leipaja, which is still quite expensive compared with the other regions are even cheaper, have a look at Rural Estates just to see how cheap they are, it makes you realize we are being robbed in the uk,

I have just booked a flight back to the UK for 12 GBP Ryanair

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Where I live (Geneva), for houses it's 10k GBP per square metre, that's an average, the expensive areas are much more. Apartments 9k per m2.

This seems excessive and even with 10-year fixes at 3% interest available buying is out of the question.

How much where you live?

How many houses/flats are for sale in Geneva at the moment? Not many I would imagine. They are just in the stage of building some flats on the Petit Lancy/Pont Thingy cross roads, one of the busiest and most polluted road junctions in Geneve and all are sold off plan.

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NW3

Needless to say, I rent.

Of course.

When I saw these figures for London rental yields posted on a recent thread I thought they were well dodgy, and your testimonial for Hampstead certainly seems to confirm this.

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Of course.

When I saw these figures for London rental yields posted on a recent thread I thought they were well dodgy, and your testimonial for Hampstead certainly seems to confirm this.

There is a lot of variability within the very low yields in your link, mostly to do with the housing allowances granted to overseas employees.

The drops in rent in some market segments once the premium lease regime was changed and banks became stricter on rents was palpable.

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There is a lot of variability within the very low yields in your link, mostly to do with the housing allowances granted to overseas employees.

The drops in rent in some market segments once the premium lease regime was changed and banks became stricter on rents was palpable.

But isn't the gross rental yield based on the figures you provided for NW3 even lower than those displayed in the link?

2.4 pct versus a 3.5-4.6 range

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But isn't the gross rental yield based on the figures you provided for NW3 even lower than those displayed in the link?

2.4 pct versus a 3.5-4.6 range

Absolutely.

House prices in parts of NW3 were driven higher by massive rents being paid on behalf of overseas employees which were tax advantaged through the premium lease structure.

Now that the premium lease regime has been changed and overseas employers have had to cut back on rental expenses because of the economic crisis, rents have collapsed whilst prices haven't. The lag between rents and prices has caused the gross yields to collapse.

I think that this is a massive ticking time bomb in "prime" London that could overwhelm overseas purchasers.

To add : I think about cashflow rather than prices / potential capital gains. Apologies if my bias made my previous post unclear.

Edited by LuckyOne

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Hampshire 1sq metre : £1,548.

I paid £2307 per square meter for my house, though it was at the 2009 bottom, so more like £2900 now.

That said my house is large for the price I got it at and so would say very good value, most properties round here (Surrey in general) are closer to £3600 per square meter, eg a 200 square meter house (2200 sqr feet) is about £750k.

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I bought a massive old place in the Scottish borders for £640 per square metre but it has to be said it's a bit of a fixer upper...

Great views and I'm helping out the local economy with the fixing upping. I'm slightly concerned the fixing upping might cost more than the house so if I had the skillz I'd have the price change with one of these "counters" as the bills come in. I think we're at about £750 psm now which I wouldn't mind but the house looks considerably worse than when I bought it :unsure:

City centre flats in Edinburgh from about £2,000 psm to £4,000 psm. If you're skillful you can pay several thousand psm for a new build penthouse in one of our premier developments. Then you can look down on all the poor people who live in places that are worth less than the money you'll lose on your "investment" :o

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Singapore 10,000 gbp sqm , rental would be 30 gbp per month per m2 , but with mortgages at 1.15% buying is 10 gbp per m until rates explode ...

I am also selling my garbage flat in nw3 for around 10k per m2 , already exchanged ,the net yield was around 15 gbp per m2 per month ,

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I paid £2307 per square meter for my house, though it was at the 2009 bottom, so more like £2900 now.

That said my house is large for the price I got it at and so would say very good value, most properties round here (Surrey in general) are closer to £3600 per square meter, eg a 200 square meter house (2200 sqr feet) is about £750k.

You are also describing West Sussex, for good (I just mean safer) areas.

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Where I live (Geneva), for houses it's 10k GBP per square metre, (...)

This is a very useful tread. Thanks for starting it. I hope more readers will contribute.

By the way, in most (all!) other countries that I am familiar with (some 5), price per square meter is usually displayed at the top of properties adverts, and many times available as filter in websites. And frequently used as base for data on average property prices. Not here in Britain though. Why not?! Weird.

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Central Budapest (near castle hill Buda side) 19th century apartments are rather expensive, about 1000GBP/m2

Land prices for "building your own villa" on the Buda hills about 100GBP/m2 (27% of land area can be built on is the rule), construction cost about 500GBP/m2, you can have a 200m2 villa with a 600m2 garden, indoor pool etc... for about 200k (in a posh part of Buda).

This in a city with better schools, transport, restaurants than London, and decent opportunities for business (8-15k euro/month income possible without too much creative accounting).

This is a very useful tread. Thanks for starting it. I hope more readers will contribute.

By the way, in most (all!) other countries that I am familiar with (some 5), price per square meter is usually displayed at the top of properties adverts, and many times available as filter in websites. And frequently used as base for data on average property prices. Not here in Britain though. Why not?! Weird.

UK estate agents are very smart, and the customers make the biggest spending decision of their life without knowing the SIZE (basic metric of value) of the property they're buying!! its like buying gold without knowing the weight and carats! LOL.

Edited by hayder

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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