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A Man From Shelter...

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...trying to get me to sign up. I'm a bit deaf and he had a strong accent, so I can't recount his initial spiel verbatim, but when he mentioned 'affordable housing' my blood rose a bit and I sent him packing in a slightly drunk and unfocused rant about how affordable housing was a load of b*ll*cks, designed to enrich property developers at the expense of the taxpayer, and that they were demonstrably wrong on the issue.

This makes me think I was right to do so:

http://england.shelter.org.uk/campaigns/housing_issues/Home_ownership_issues/low_cost_home_ownership_schemes

But was I? I feel a bit better than I would have just sending him packing out of tightness, which is what I do for all other charities who doorstep or 'chug' me, on the basis that I want to choose who to give money to, not be pressure sold it. I give about 1.25% of my monthly take home to charity, plus a tenner a month to No2ID, which although not a charity, is an extremely worthy cause IMO. And I bung a lump sum of £50-£200 to the DEC every time something terrible happens.

But enough of me justifying myself...Shelter, yay or nay?

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...trying to get me to sign up. I'm a bit deaf and he had a strong accent, so I can't recount his initial spiel verbatim, but when he mentioned 'affordable housing' my blood rose a bit and I sent him packing in a slightly drunk and unfocused rant about how affordable housing was a load of b*ll*cks, designed to enrich property developers at the expense of the taxpayer, and that they were demonstrably wrong on the issue.

This makes me think I was right to do so:

http://england.shelter.org.uk/campaigns/housing_issues/Home_ownership_issues/low_cost_home_ownership_schemes

But was I? I feel a bit better than I would have just sending him packing out of tightness, which is what I do for all other charities who doorstep or 'chug' me, on the basis that I want to choose who to give money to, not be pressure sold it. I give about 1.25% of my monthly take home to charity, plus a tenner a month to No2ID, which although not a charity, is an extremely worthy cause IMO. And I bung a lump sum of £50-£200 to the DEC every time something terrible happens.

But enough of me justifying myself...Shelter, yay or nay?

You are a better man than many.

I used to give much less than that monthly to Sightsavers but then I heard via the media just how much money they give to chugging firms, allegedly, and I cancelled my direct debit. They didn't even ask why I was cancelling despite having given to them for years. I later read that so many cancel direct debits within a few months that they rely on signing up new people for short periods. I felt like a mug.

What I am saying is that I fear many modern big charities are just big businesses.

Probably best to give money to local people you know.

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I phoned Shelter when I was about to be evicted from this council house, or so I thought anyway. They told me I should leave otherwise the council might get in and change the locks....not especially good advice considering I'm still here.

Fck um I say.

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You are a better man than many.

I used to give much less than that monthly to Sightsavers but then I heard via the media just how much money they give to chugging firms, allegedly, and I cancelled my direct debit. They didn't even ask why I was cancelling despite having given to them for years. I later read that so many cancel direct debits within a few months that they rely on signing up new people for short periods. I felt like a mug.

What I am saying is that I fear many modern big charities are just big businesses.

Probably best to give money to local people you know.

I used to give £2 a week to Camalot but packed in a while back because I tight.

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At least he'll have something to chat about with their mates about this alcoholic nutter that ranted and raved about housing, to be honest I don't think the poor guy got why I was there so I left before he got nasty.

That's care in the community for you :D:lol::lol:

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You are a better man than many.

I used to give much less than that monthly to Sightsavers but then I heard via the media just how much money they give to chugging firms, allegedly, and I cancelled my direct debit.

Well, when you put it like that, I don't know that I am a better man, though cheers even so :) .

My accumulated history of charity giving goes thus: signed up to Amnesty for a fiver a month on the street about 10 years ago. This was in the infancy of chugging, and I don't know whether the guy was getting paid or was a volunteer. Never seen an Amnesty chugger since, and I've paid my fiver a month all this time, though I've never done anything like writing a letter on behalf of a political prisoner, which is kind of the point of Amnesty. I don't even get letters from them any more, I don't know if some poor sod at one of my previous addresses now gets them, though I doubt it.

A few years ago when my wife was in the latter stages of her first OU degree their charitable arm cold called one night at home asking her to sign up. I've always paid for her courses, so she put them on to me. I was pretty drunk, and I had some issue with the scripted sales patter, so demanded of the flustered callcentre chap that he put me on to a supervisor. Having had a robust discussion with said supervisor, possibly about the relative merits of the OU's work in the UK and abroad, I seem to recall that I made my point by contributing both a fiver a month to their domestic degree subsidy program, and another fiver to their overseas education program. That told them :) (this despite the fact that I don't have a degree myself).

Then not long afer, I signed off from an early shift of bus driving, and was assailed in the garage by a woman who was signing people up for Payroll Giving. She claimed to be a volunteer, and her general air of hippy-do-goodering gave me no real cause to doubt her, so I signed up for SightSavers as I'd always thought them a very worthy charity. And then to annoy my mate who's a completely uncharitable *******, but who was diagnosed with Parkinsons in his 20s, I signed up with Action for Neurological Disorders- both of these for a pound a week, since I was paid weekly at the time.

And so- the question of the rights and wrongs of giving to charities who employ chuggers. I read once that often a charity only profits from a chugging sign-up if they keep paying for over a year. But then in the real world all charities have to devote a portion of their income to continued fundraising, and this is typically 15-20% of total income. If chugging companies work on a no-profit-no-fee basis from the charity concerned, then I guess they have nothing to lose by signing up- and if that's not how they work, then no smart charity would continue to employ them, and hence they wouldn't continue to be a daily hazard on the streets.

I think a sensible way forward is not to disown any charity who uses chuggers, it's to refuse the chuggers and sign up direct, knowing that all you money is going to the charity (and that unfortunately 20% of it will not be spent on the people you're donating for).

They didn't even ask why I was cancelling despite having given to them for years. I later read that so many cancel direct debits within a few months that they rely on signing up new people for short periods. I felt like a mug.

What I am saying is that I fear many modern big charities are just big businesses.

Well, I think that charities have no choice but to act like businesses in certain ways- else they fail. I have no reason to believe that SightSavers, to use the example we have in common, don't spend 80% of the money I give them distributing Mectizan and paying for cataract surgery for people that need it.

I should add that I once gave a bit to Shelter. My mum had a Leeds account; they merged with the Halifax, which then demutualised, and she got three grand out of it. I also had a Leeds account, but I was 17, so I didn't. But anyway, mum quite rightly said that this was a windfall we didn't deserve, and so we'd split it ten ways as we were a family of five- a tenth each to keep, and a tenth each to give to charity. I gave 150 to Shelter and 150 to Sightsavers.

So should I sign up for Shelter now, or just be a bit guilty for ranting at a poor African fella doing a shitty job, who I wouldn't have signed up with anyway?

I'm sure he has far les chance of buying a house than I do. Maybe I should have interrogated him about his own housing arrangements.

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Well, when you put it like that, I don't know that I am a better man, though cheers even so :) .

My accumulated history of charity giving goes thus: signed up to Amnesty for a fiver a month on the street about 10 years ago. This was in the infancy of chugging, and I don't know whether the guy was getting paid or was a volunteer. Never seen an Amnesty chugger since, and I've paid my fiver a month all this time, though I've never done anything like writing a letter on behalf of a political prisoner, which is kind of the point of Amnesty. I don't even get letters from them any more, I don't know if some poor sod at one of my previous addresses now gets them, though I doubt it.

A few years ago when my wife was in the latter stages of her first OU degree their charitable arm cold called one night at home asking her to sign up. I've always paid for her courses, so she put them on to me. I was pretty drunk, and I had some issue with the scripted sales patter, so demanded of the flustered callcentre chap that he put me on to a supervisor. Having had a robust discussion with said supervisor, possibly about the relative merits of the OU's work in the UK and abroad, I seem to recall that I made my point by contributing both a fiver a month to their domestic degree subsidy program, and another fiver to their overseas education program. That told them :) (this despite the fact that I don't have a degree myself).

Then not long afer, I signed off from an early shift of bus driving, and was assailed in the garage by a woman who was signing people up for Payroll Giving. She claimed to be a volunteer, and her general air of hippy-do-goodering gave me no real cause to doubt her, so I signed up for SightSavers as I'd always thought them a very worthy charity. And then to annoy my mate who's a completely uncharitable *******, but who was diagnosed with Parkinsons in his 20s, I signed up with Action for Neurological Disorders- both of these for a pound a week, since I was paid weekly at the time.

And so- the question of the rights and wrongs of giving to charities who employ chuggers. I read once that often a charity only profits from a chugging sign-up if they keep paying for over a year. But then in the real world all charities have to devote a portion of their income to continued fundraising, and this is typically 15-20% of total income. If chugging companies work on a no-profit-no-fee basis from the charity concerned, then I guess they have nothing to lose by signing up- and if that's not how they work, then no smart charity would continue to employ them, and hence they wouldn't continue to be a daily hazard on the streets.

I think a sensible way forward is not to disown any charity who uses chuggers, it's to refuse the chuggers and sign up direct, knowing that all you money is going to the charity (and that unfortunately 20% of it will not be spent on the people you're donating for).

Well, I think that charities have no choice but to act like businesses in certain ways- else they fail. I have no reason to believe that SightSavers, to use the example we have in common, don't spend 80% of the money I give them distributing Mectizan and paying for cataract surgery for people that need it.

I should add that I once gave a bit to Shelter. My mum had a Leeds account; they merged with the Halifax, which then demutualised, and she got three grand out of it. I also had a Leeds account, but I was 17, so I didn't. But anyway, mum quite rightly said that this was a windfall we didn't deserve, and so we'd split it ten ways as we were a family of five- a tenth each to keep, and a tenth each to give to charity. I gave 150 to Shelter and 150 to Sightsavers.

So should I sign up for Shelter now, or just be a bit guilty for ranting at a poor African fella doing a shitty job, who I wouldn't have signed up with anyway?

I'm sure he has far les chance of buying a house than I do. Maybe I should have interrogated him about his own housing arrangements.

I was chugged by Amnesty International over christmas...I said yes, yes it's a worthy cause, but I volunteer myself for charity, so thanks but no thanks.

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I liked this poster campaign.

http://www.housepric...howtopic=137123

Unfortunately, theyre like the muslims. Know Liebour will pay them off, so despite illegal wars against their people (or housing apartheid) will always lobby for liebour.

I cannot be arsed to read the rest of this link, but this is really really out of order.

Xenophobia results in wars.

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I was chugged for a blind charity in Oxford Street. I signed up for a fiver a month, but declined to give my age on the grounds that it was none of their business, and my phone number on the grounds that I didn't want them phoning me or passing it on.

A week or so later I got a letter from them, saying that they were 'unable' to process my 'application' without this information.

Anyone would think I was asking them for money, cheeky b*ggers. I put the letter in the bin.

Of course they debited my a/c anyway and it's still going out years later.

But I don't do chuggers any more. They always want phone numbers and other info that they can only want in order to pigeonhole you for marketing purposes.

I give to quite a few charities about 3 times a year, in a batch. I tend to ditch any that bombard me with loads of expensive material. Arthritis Research is one I gave to for the first time at Christmas after a mailshot - since then they've sent me at least two more A4 loads of give-us-more stuff - that's them off the list.

I stopped giving to the NSPCC a few years ago after they sent me 3 identical batches of glossy promo inside a week - I told them to sort it and stop wasting money but another triple batch arrived soon afterwards.

Some uber-religious Catholic outfit once got hold of my details - all they evidently do is pray - and started sending me garish rosaries and elasticated bracelets with mini-Jesuses all over them. I started Returning To Sender and they soon got the message. :)

Another thing - they all swear blind they don't pass your details on, but they do. I regularly get mailshots from some I've never heard of, inc. the uber-Catholic lot.

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  • 309 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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