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We've Been Served Notice

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Two years after being served notice by our landlady for wanting to sell, we have now been served notice again. How can renting be an alternative if your family cannot be settled.

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Two years after being served notice by our landlady for wanting to sell, we have now been served notice again. How can renting be an alternative if your family cannot be settled.

You're just not choosing the right landlords.

On a serious note, it is a travesty that landlords do not need any reason to provide you with any reasonable reason (or indeed any reason at all) for their decision to terminate your tenancy.

At least you will have the joy of being able to track the property on rightmove as it slowly drops in value, and your ex-landlady haemmorages money in lost rent and maintenance and bills from somewhere else.

If you are a family, what are the chances of you getting onto a council housing scheme? After all, you're being thrown out of your home.

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Two years after being served notice by our landlady for wanting to sell, we have now been served notice again. How can renting be an alternative if your family cannot be settled.

So that's 5 times in the last two years then.

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Two years after being served notice by our landlady for wanting to sell, we have now been served notice again. How can renting be an alternative if your family cannot be settled.

Indeed. If you have a place for rent...that is exactly what it should be...for rent.

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Two years after being served notice by our landlady for wanting to sell, we have now been served notice again. How can renting be an alternative if your family cannot be settled.

It can happen if you buy too. Not so likely, admittedly, but councils issue CPOs when they want to build something and your house is in the way. Imagine if you bought now and received a CPO a couple of years later with a value of half what you paid.

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[always check that rightmove tool for the new postcode of the place you are going to rent. We had this happen to us last year but when I found that rightmove tool I saw that the rental house we were in had been listed for sale the year before we rented. Never a good sign. Wouldn't have taken it if I'd have know. Landlord lied to us as she showed us round.

Our new landlord has also hinted that HE might put the place on the market. I always keep my eye out on the market for something I could buy in desperation, because if it happens again, I'm going to buy something - even though I don't like it. I hate moving my two young girls around, they don't sleep well after a move and don't really understand it. you know what kids are like with their bedrooms. I got lucky with this rental - my eldest daughter got an en-suite - which sold it to her BUT that means a down grade for the next move guaranteed!

whatever happens I wish you and your family well for the future and hope you find a nice house that doesn't get sold from under you.

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Isn't it great that in this country those who work and pay their own rent can be shunted about at a whim. However those who get their rent paid for them and havent paid a penny towards it - can generally stay in the same place for decades. In some cases even handing the place over to their kids as if it were their own.

Brilliant eh. Don't we have our priorities sorted just perfectly. :(

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Two years after being served notice by our landlady for wanting to sell, we have now been served notice again. How can renting be an alternative if your family cannot be settled.

Sorry to hear that TB.

Our renting laws are really a fecking disgrace.

Good luck, I hope you find a better 9and cheaper!) place than the one you are leaving.

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It cuts both ways, a tenant can leave without having to give any reason too.

It maybe a royal pain in the backside but take the opportunity to find a better/cheaper place. Box up some stuff for long term storage so it never needs to be opened again until you buy and thin out some of your junk.

I am dreading it happening tbh but will look hard for silver linings.

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It cuts both ways, a tenant can leave without having to give any reason too.

(...)

That is not a comparable thing! The landlord will have 30 days notice. Plenty of time to find replacement tenants - assuming he has a good product to rent, at a good price. Whilst the tenants will have to move their home, belongings, their families!

A comparable thing would be if tenants could tell the landlord to move house with 2 months notice.

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That is not a comparable thing! The landlord will have 30 days notice. Plenty of time to find replacement tenants - assuming he has a good product to rent, at a good price. Whilst the tenants will have to move their home, belongings, their families!

A comparable thing would be if tenants could tell the landlord to move house with 2 months notice.

I never said that it was comparable, my remark was in response to the comment below

" it is a travesty that landlords do not need any reason to provide you with any reasonable reason (or indeed any reason at all) for their decision to terminate your tenancy."

There are swings and roundabouts. You risk this happening while renting and taking advantage of the current climate by staying out of the market. No point getting your knickers in a bunch TOW, if you dont like it then just buy a fking house. There are only 2 choices here, rent and accept what that does and could mean or buy. It really is that simple.

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Two years after being served notice by our landlady for wanting to sell, we have now been served notice again. How can renting be an alternative if your family cannot be settled.

PITA eh ? We had to move all our stuff 3 times in a year.. not a pleasant experience.

I find "professional" landlords to be better than those who have moved to work overseas, or are likely to want back in.

Still doesn't make you immune tho

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I never said that it was comparable, my remark was in response to the comment below

" it is a travesty that landlords do not need any reason to provide you with any reasonable reason (or indeed any reason at all) for their decision to terminate your tenancy."

There are swings and roundabouts. You risk this happening while renting and taking advantage of the current climate by staying out of the market. No point getting your knickers in a bunch TOW, if you dont like it then just buy a fking house. There are only 2 choices here, rent and accept what that does and could mean or buy. It really is that simple.

Some people have no choice but to rent as they can't afford to buy

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I never said that it was comparable, my remark was in response to the comment below

" it is a travesty that landlords do not need any reason to provide you with any reasonable reason (or indeed any reason at all) for their decision to terminate your tenancy."

There are swings and roundabouts. You risk this happening while renting and taking advantage of the current climate by staying out of the market. No point getting your knickers in a bunch TOW, if you dont like it then just buy a fking house. There are only 2 choices here, rent and accept what that does and could mean or buy. It really is that simple.

I hope Stars reads this and can join in. You cannot say that the two are in any way comparable. There are many reasons why somebody might want to rent rather than buy, or may not be able to buy, and have to rent.

There is no mechanism for a renter to be able to secure a long-term tenancy in the UK (well, there might be, but I haven't seen any landlord who would enter into such an agreement - why would they?).

The property, to a landlord, is a cash machine on two counts - they are looking to get a return on the rental, and also on any capital appreciation it might achieve (although that is an argument for a different thread).

To the renter, it is their HOME. They may have ties and commitments in the area. Technically, a landlord cannot discriminate if you have pets, or animals, or whatever. But, if they find that you have any of these, or just don't like the colour of your new car, they can quite legally serve you notice and you are out on your ear, without a HOME, in just two months. That to me is criminal.

The other scenario, of the tenant leaving, is purely a commercial risk for the landlord. Any remotely competent 'professional' landlord would have taken voids into account.

Tio summarise - on one hand, you have a business with costs and profits, and on the other you have some families whole life. Not comparable at all.

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Isn't it great that in this country those who work and pay their own rent can be shunted about at a whim. However those who get their rent paid for them and havent paid a penny towards it - can generally stay in the same place for decades. In some cases even handing the place over to their kids as if it were their own.

Funny how people who would once have rather cut off their limbs than live in social housing now express envy of those who do- the times they are indeed changing, if the despised inhabitants of these places are now seen as fortunate.

Don't worry though, moves are afoot to make sure that the social housing dwellers will soon share your insecurity and powelessness-

Gives you nice warm glow inside just thinking about that, doesn't it. :)

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I hope Stars reads this and can join in. You cannot say that the two are in any way comparable. There are many reasons why somebody might want to rent rather than buy, or may not be able to buy, and have to rent.

There is no mechanism for a renter to be able to secure a long-term tenancy in the UK (well, there might be, but I haven't seen any landlord who would enter into such an agreement - why would they?).

The property, to a landlord, is a cash machine on two counts - they are looking to get a return on the rental, and also on any capital appreciation it might achieve (although that is an argument for a different thread).

To the renter, it is their HOME. They may have ties and commitments in the area. Technically, a landlord cannot discriminate if you have pets, or animals, or whatever. But, if they find that you have any of these, or just don't like the colour of your new car, they can quite legally serve you notice and you are out on your ear, without a HOME, in just two months. That to me is criminal.

The other scenario, of the tenant leaving, is purely a commercial risk for the landlord. Any remotely competent 'professional' landlord would have taken voids into account.

Tio summarise - on one hand, you have a business with costs and profits, and on the other you have some families whole life. Not comparable at all.

FFS, did I not clearly say "I never said that it was comparable" ?

All that I was pointing out is that the landlord doesnt have to give a reason to terminate and neither do you as a tenant.

I know all about how unfair the system is but it isnt going to change any time soon and certainly not as a result of a few people whining about it on the internet.

I said that there were two choices, there is clearly a third though - move to a country like germany where renting is the norm and tenants have real rights and are treated like human beings.

...and stars can poke it too, read what I have said - I am a tenant aswell.

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Funny how people who would once have rather cut off their limbs than live in social housing now express envy of those who do- the times they are indeed changing, if the despised inhabitants of these places are now seen as fortunate.

Don't worry though, moves are afoot to make sure that the social housing dwellers will soon share your insecurity and powelessness-

Gives you nice warm glow inside just thinking about that, doesn't it. :)

As long as they don't come and live near me. ;)

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Funny how people who would once have rather cut off their limbs than live in social housing now express envy of those who do- the times they are indeed changing, if the despised inhabitants of these places are now seen as fortunate.

Don't worry though, moves are afoot to make sure that the social housing dwellers will soon share your insecurity and powelessness-

Gives you nice warm glow inside just thinking about that, doesn't it. :)

It is envy of the long term nature of where they live - not the actual place itself. Although some council areas are not too bad.

Just think about it. Those who actually pay for something are given less rights than those who get it for free.

It is ******ing insane. And someone is going to have to have a pretty amazing argument to convince me otherwise.

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It is envy of the long term nature of where they live - not the actual place itself. Although some council areas are not too bad.

Just think about it. Those who actually pay for something are given less rights than those who get it for free.

It is ******ing insane. And someone is going to have to have a pretty amazing argument to convince me otherwise.

It's not illogical. There are 6 million of them - numbers brings clout.

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It's not illogical. There are 6 million of them - numbers brings clout.

Could be. I think it is more the case that those dealing with them cannot be arsed with the hassle of moving them around. As there are so many.

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Our landlord this time was somewhat an accidental landlord. He bought the house to as the original buyer pulled out and if didn't want to lose out at the top of the chain so completed it at the bottom. Confusing huh! We knew it was a risk, but we didn't have a lot of choice, what with only two months notice, having to be within walking distance to my daughters school, my wife about to pop while being disabled due to pregnancy ...

He is getting nervous about the state of the housing market, he wants out before it loses any more.

The silver lining is that amature landlords are getting nervous. We might be on the verge of an avalanche of pent up supply!

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Two years after being served notice by our landlady for wanting to sell, we have now been served notice again. How can renting be an alternative if your family cannot be settled.

Think of it as an opportunity.

Flee the country and give your kids a better future.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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