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Barclays Capital Staff Get 24Pc Pay Rise

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/banksandfinance/8327345/Barclays-Capital-staff-get-24pc-pay-rise.html

Staff compensation at Barclays Capital increased by 24pc in the past 12 months, with the average worker in the division receiving a payout this year worth £235,807 compared with £191,000 in 2010.

Compensation measured as a proportion of Barcap's net income increased from 33pc in 2009 to 43pc last year, giving the division a total pay pool worth £5.85bn last year against £3.84bn the year before.

The increase in total pay came despite a 12pc fall year-on-year in the total amount of bonuses paid out by Barcap, following its pledge earlier this month to curb bonuses as part of the Project Merlin agreement signed last week with the Government to limit bankers' pay.

The overall increase is partly accounted for by the inclusion of deferred bonus awards made in previous years, as well as increased pension contributions.Despite the increase, the average pay at Barclays is below that at many of its main rivals. Goldman Sachs handed its staff a payout for 2010 worth £269,000 per employee on average, while at Deutsche Bank the figure was £316,000.

Imagine what the BoE would do if the proles demanded comparable pay increases? Apparently rates would increase as this would be bad inflation. As long as these wage increases are confined to the banking sector inflation can be controlled.

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Big fraud ring - govt/central/bank/other banks.

Looking after their mates (and themselves), using the economic levers to pull on their own set of slot machines.

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I think most wealthy investors are serious, intelligent people. If they look and their £1 million investment portfolio is now worth £1.5 million 4 years later.. are they angry if they hear the man managing that made huge money? Maybe a little jealous but they still go back to him because they are getting ahead.

But if their £1 million porfolio is now worth £750,000, 4 years later. And they hear the man managing it made huge money?

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Having the exclusive right to issue and lend at interest to an economy its essential means of exchange gives total power to the banking system.

As Lord Ashton warned, such power will inevitably corrupt.

We can regulate (e.g. Basel etc.) but the real power remains with the bankers, and sooner or later it will devastate us.

Until we bring about money reform and publicly issue our own debt-free, persistently circulating means of exchange, we will suffer the consequences of the present crazy system.

We have built an all-powerful money machine which continuously beats us up.

Let's work to get rid of it, like these people:

http://www.youtube.com/user/PositiveMoneyUK

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So Barclays already had a bad bank/magic carpet type set-up? No wonder they say their their bonuses are dependent on keeping core capital of at least 7%. It's impossible to fail capital requirement rules these days - just shove anything bad under another carpet?

Cayman Islands exit takes early £532m bite out of BarclaysBarclays has begun to unwind the Protium transaction, which helped it avoid multibillion pound writedowns on loans

The Cayman Islands-based Protium fund manages Barclays’s most toxic assets.

Amid the furore over bankers' pay, Barclays has quietly revealed that it is taking a £532m hit as it tries to extricate itself from a fund in the Cayman Islands which manages $12bn (£7.5bn) of its most troublesome assets

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2011/feb/15/cayman-islands-protium-barclays-exit

Edited by Redhat Sly

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There is only one way to fight back--move your account to a building society or credit union.

With respect, RB, but that is just a skirmish and does not address the underlying problem.

Any money lent to and/or borrowed from a credit union etc. has already been borrowed into existence at interest from a commercial bank.

Someone, somewhere is paying interest on the corresponding originating loan(s).

Also the credit union itself will have a bank account and thus the money will remain within the overarching debt-based banking system - there is nowhere else it can be.

Root and branch money reform is the only real solution to our debt slavery.

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There is only one way to fight back--move your account to a building society or credit union.

+1

I have £8s in my bank account earning 0.1% still too much I feel, might invest some of this in a McD breakfast.

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the only reason for higher basics is the stupidity from the government and the public in wanting to crack down on bonuses and how their remuneration is structured - which will cost them more to get rid of staff if/when they do badly..... surely, you can see that they have had to pay more basic because if their bonuses are cracked down on, then to retain good staff, they have to put the money back on somewhere else.

BTW, the RBS lot are over the moon at the lunacy conducted on them by the government - guaranteed wages now, not variable bonuses.....

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the only reason for higher basics is the stupidity from the government and the public in wanting to crack down on bonuses and how their remuneration is structured - which will cost them more to get rid of staff if/when they do badly..... surely, you can see that they have had to pay more basic because if their bonuses are cracked down on, then to retain good staff, they have to put the money back on somewhere else.

BTW, the RBS lot are over the moon at the lunacy conducted on them by the government - guaranteed wages now, not variable bonuses.....

I'm sorry you got that the wrong way round

The public and the government just wanted the banking industry to pay less to its employees to reflect the huge public subsidies that were keeping the banks in business

The banks themselves decided to hike basic salaries to try and fool the public and government to be able to say they were paying lower bonuses to their staff

Nobody is fooled, nobody is happy

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With respect, RB, but that is just a skirmish and does not address the underlying problem.

Any money lent to and/or borrowed from a credit union etc. has already been borrowed into existence at interest from a commercial bank.

Someone, somewhere is paying interest on the corresponding originating loan(s).

Also the credit union itself will have a bank account and thus the money will remain within the overarching debt-based banking system - there is nowhere else it can be.

Root and branch money reform is the only real solution to our debt slavery.

Unfortunately I have to agree with you. You can't run from it in the current system. I 100% agree with your plan of debt-free money freely circulating.

I personally believe that our economy would allow for great amounts of that money to be put into circulation as economic activity would rise to meet the demands of it. Rigth now we are crushed under heavy debt, and few people have any money. There are tons of people who want to work, but if no one has any money to buy it makes a small, weak economy.

An example I like to use, is tons of people would love to buy a new car, but can't afford it. Also tons of people would like a job at a car factory, but they are shutting down for lack of demand. And yet more people would love a job t a steel mill to provide steel for the car makers.

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Unfortunately I have to agree with you. You can't run from it in the current system. I 100% agree with your plan of debt-free money freely circulating.

I personally believe that our economy would allow for great amounts of that money to be put into circulation as economic activity would rise to meet the demands of it. Rigth now we are crushed under heavy debt, and few people have any money. There are tons of people who want to work, but if no one has any money to buy it makes a small, weak economy.

An example I like to use, is tons of people would love to buy a new car, but can't afford it. Also tons of people would like a job at a car factory, but they are shutting down for lack of demand. And yet more people would love a job t a steel mill to provide steel for the car makers.

That's a good example, which should make people think.

It's astounding how deeply we are psychologically locked into the current system.

Collectively (publicly) issued, debt-free, persistently circulating money isn't a radical idea.

It's just common sense, the sort of money system that any group of inter-trading people will organize for themselves, given the chance (e.g. LETS).

So obvious, so simple, but so difficult for most people to see.

Still, we soldier on ...

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Why wouldn't they when Diamond Bob's got Osborne sucking his c0ck.

Criminal theft continues in plain sight with The Bullingdon Boys as cheerleaders.

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I think most wealthy investors are serious, intelligent people. If they look and their £1 million investment portfolio is now worth £1.5 million 4 years later.. are they angry if they hear the man managing that made huge money? Maybe a little jealous but they still go back to him because they are getting ahead.

But if their £1 million porfolio is now worth £750,000, 4 years later. And they hear the man managing it made huge money?

We keep hearing this - that the investors, the shareholders will do something about this......however it isn't happening. I wonder why?

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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