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shavedchimp

Mice - Landlord Responsible?

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We are currently being inundated by mice, shitting everywhere and eating various things. When we first viewed the house with the landlord, we remarked on the few mouse traps that were left there. He had no comment on this.

Now the problem has returned and magnified - do we have any right to complain and ask for his assistance? The truth is, this old house has loads of cracks and holes through which mice can enter.

Have you ever had a similar problem to this?

shavedchimp

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had it 3 seperate times in 3 different properties. It's not a difficult thing to sort. Me personally I would sort it myself. Get yourself 2 or 3 traps, I prefer the humane ones, the old fashioned ones "little nipper" and the like, are cheaper, but they can make a mess. You should sort it in a few weeka, three at most. Bait the traps overnight, come the am you should see something, ensure if you use humane that you release well away from your house ie bottom of garden is no good, al least 3 miles from where you live. Keep going while you are catching them. Peanut butter is by far the best bait. Alternatively get a cat, but they tend to leave half eaten carcasses around the place,

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We are currently being inundated by mice, shitting everywhere and eating various things. When we first viewed the house with the landlord, we remarked on the few mouse traps that were left there. He had no comment on this.

Now the problem has returned and magnified - do we have any right to complain and ask for his assistance? The truth is, this old house has loads of cracks and holes through which mice can enter.

Have you ever had a similar problem to this?

shavedchimp

Agree with the peanut butter bait.

If you go the humane trap route, why not keep them alive them and deliver them to the LL. A tube through the letter box would work.

A problem shared and all that ;)

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had it 3 seperate times in 3 different properties. It's not a difficult thing to sort. Me personally I would sort it myself. Get yourself 2 or 3 traps, I prefer the humane ones, the old fashioned ones "little nipper" and the like, are cheaper, but they can make a mess. You should sort it in a few weeka, three at most. Bait the traps overnight, come the am you should see something, ensure if you use humane that you release well away from your house ie bottom of garden is no good, al least 3 miles from where you live. Keep going while you are catching them. Peanut butter is by far the best bait. Alternatively get a cat, but they tend to leave half eaten carcasses around the place,

If you're going down the humane trap route then you need to give them a fighting chance, eg:

http://mouseranch.com/FYI/releasing.shtml#relocating

Otherwise don't bother and just kill the fekkers.

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We are currently being inundated by mice, shitting everywhere and eating various things. When we first viewed the house with the landlord, we remarked on the few mouse traps that were left there. He had no comment on this.

Now the problem has returned and magnified - do we have any right to complain and ask for his assistance? The truth is, this old house has loads of cracks and holes through which mice can enter.

Have you ever had a similar problem to this?

shavedchimp

Are you sure they are mice not rats? The local council are more likely to take an interest if it's rats.

Try

http://www.ratbehavior.org/QuizRatOrMouse.htm

I have both which I just live with - rural detached cottage impossible to rodent proof. The cat helps; if I really want to get shot of a persistent rat I use bits of Snickers bars- the combination of chocolate & peanuts seems irresistible to them.

I vaguely remember an earlier (about a year ago?) thread where the consensus was that the landlord didn't have any absolute duty to help as it's impossible to eradicate rodents and tenants often contribute to the problem by leaving food out overnight etc.

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I vaguely remember an earlier (about a year ago?) thread where the consensus was that the landlord didn't have any absolute duty to help as it's impossible to eradicate rodents and tenants often contribute to the problem by leaving food out overnight etc.

Yep, previous thread came down on the side of tenants being responsible.

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Yep, previous thread came down on the side of tenants being responsible.

The thread last year coincided with a complaint I received about rats being seen in one of the apartment buildings in one of the developments I manage. It turned out to be a false alarm, a rat was seen but it must have been a domestic pet that escaped. There were no droppings or signs of entry anywhere. Rat bait left in traps was untouched over a 3 month period. That didn't stop a pest control company charging a tenant for a lot of unnecessary work before I was notified.

Local authorities no longer have a duty to provide a pest control service. The householder is responsible for keeping their property free of vermin.

A tenant is the householder and is responsible. However if the problem is due to a fault or disrepair of the structure of the building then the landlord is responsible for remedying the fault. Cats are a good solution though.

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Yep, previous thread came down on the side of tenants being responsible.

However if the property is in a state of disrepair that allows access by rodents then the LA could serve a Notice on the Landlord. Environmental Protection Act 1990 - Section 80 or one of the new provisions in the Housing Act 2005 - Housing Health and Safety Rating System.

Alternatively Section 4 notice - Prevention of Damage by Pests Act 1949 on either landlord or tenant depending on the circumstances.

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Are you sure they are mice not rats? The local council are more likely to take an interest if it's rats.

Try

http://www.ratbehavi...zRatOrMouse.htm

I have both which I just live with - rural detached cottage impossible to rodent proof. The cat helps; if I really want to get shot of a persistent rat I use bits of Snickers bars- the combination of chocolate & peanuts seems irresistible to them.

I vaguely remember an earlier (about a year ago?) thread where the consensus was that the landlord didn't have any absolute duty to help as it's impossible to eradicate rodents and tenants often contribute to the problem by leaving food out overnight etc.

I rented an isolated farm for years in Norfolk.

The rats used to come in about a week before really cold weather arrived - every winter.

They got in thru the rainwater soak away pipes and climbed up the drainpipes - biting a hole into the roof.

Peanut butter mixed with rat poison from a friendly farmer (wear gloves) got 'em or cheap milk choc bits set up on a trap.

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Alternatively get a cat, but they tend to leave half eaten carcasses around the place,

A snake might be a cleaner solution. Or several snakes: they eat a whole lot less than warm-blooded animals.

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glue traps along the runs at choke points , check several times a day , bit of chocolate in the middle , kill the bleeders with a sharp knife , and straight to the bin

kill the fekkers over the bin and outside , because as soon as the heart stops beating the fleas will jump ship

does the job

dont use poison

Edited by Tankus

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When we had a rodent problem the cat's contribution towards it consisted of finding more in the garden and dragging them in too.

Edit: The problem with poison is that they can end up dying in completely inaccessable places, and the smell of decaying rat isn't pleasant. If you're really inundated it may be the most practical solution, if you're prepared to put up with the smell (and possibly associated hygeine issues).

Edited by Riedquat

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  • 285 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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