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pyracantha

Can An Ea Say This?

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I came across this place which has been re-listed at a lower price (now fp £260k):

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-29160487.html

I'd guess it's a distressed sale but what really caught my eye were the words "no offers".

If the EA means that offers other than £260k will not be accepted - can they say this? I thought EA's are legally obliged to pass on all offers.

My OH had a laugh and thought maybe they meant "we've had no offers". Perhaps I should email them on this basis and say I am sorry they have had no offers but perhaps if they lowered the price they might get some....

;)

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They are a law unto themselves are EA's.

Put in an offer you are happy to pay ( or start point towards) .

When they put such trite as offers in excess of .... You can but only try an offer below that and see. If been on Market a while etc they will have become aware that

no one is rushing to offer in excess of

you tahe your chance make your offer and like me and many others sit back and watch and aphantom buyer will inevitably crawl out of woodwork with a better offer, it'll go stc for week or 3 and then come back on Market and languish ..... We've been there with 2 properties before and are now still in middle of such a debacle with 2 others.

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My OH had a laugh and thought maybe they meant "we've had no offers". :D

I'm reading it as an instruction coming from the seller to say that they won't accept anything less than 260k. The capital letters kinda scream don't they? Not really a clever way of courting potential buyers. It's like these small ads that say 'no time wasters'. I always picture a seller with a nasty attittude and a sense of entitlement when I read them. Not the kind of person I'd like to do business with or feel like meeting halfway in negotiations.

When I see things like this it makes me realise just how out of touch with reality some would be sellers are.

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Pretty dumb fixed price ... £10k over the 3% stamp duty threshold.

It certainly is but on the first point EAs have to take all offers to their client unless they have been specifically instructed by their client that they do not want to know about any offers below the fixed price.

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It certainly is but on the first point EAs have to take all offers to their client unless they have been specifically instructed by their client that they do not want to know about any offers below the fixed price.

I think EA's can say 'no offers' on a price, providing they have the vendors instruction. However, they are still legally obliged to pass on any offer received EVEN IF LESS. So I would take no notice and only offer what you want to pay. It IS a stupid price at £260k because of the stamp duty threshold at £250k. So perhaps they really do want 'no offers'? I think Pyracantha should email them asking them if they really wanted 'no offers' because obviously we could all help them with that at a price £10k above the stamp duty threshold. Let us know and we'll all email 'no offer' to the EA, just as they requested.

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I think EA's can say 'no offers' on a price, providing they have the vendors instruction. However, they are still legally obliged to pass on any offer received EVEN IF LESS. So I would take no notice and only offer what you want to pay. It IS a stupid price at £260k because of the stamp duty threshold at £250k. So perhaps they really do want 'no offers'? I think Pyracantha should email them asking them if they really wanted 'no offers' because obviously we could all help them with that at a price £10k above the stamp duty threshold. Let us know and we'll all email 'no offer' to the EA, just as they requested.

clarkston@your-move.co.uk

I'm planning on sending the following email to the EA:

I've noticed you have re-listed one of your properties (at a reduced price) but would appreciate clarification of something in the schedule - "NO OFFERS".

This could be interpreted a number of ways:

1) You've received no offers - not unsurprising given the hard times ahead and buyers reluctant to buy a fixed asset in a falling market. Who is going to buy a property £10k over a stamp duty threshold anyway?

2) You don't want offers - I am sure there are plenty of people who would be happy to give you exactly that.

3) You are not prepared to accept offers. As you know, you are obliged to pass on any offers you receive.

Regards etc.

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My OH had a laugh and thought maybe they meant "we've had no offers". :D

Thats what I would assume it does mean.

When an estate agent says 'We dont accept offers' they usually mean the exact opposite, they are trying to put the idea of making an offer into your head without being too obvious.

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Yes nothing illegal there.

Seriously, right? If so then good... my girlfriend wasn't too sure. In my opinion it's common sense if you want to go ahead and strike a deal (not that I'm about to!).

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I came across this place which has been re-listed at a lower price (now fp £260k):

http://www.rightmove...y-29160487.html

I'd guess it's a distressed sale but what really caught my eye were the words "no offers".

If the EA means that offers other than £260k will not be accepted - can they say this? I thought EA's are legally obliged to pass on all offers.

My OH had a laugh and thought maybe they meant "we've had no offers". Perhaps I should email them on this basis and say I am sorry they have had no offers but perhaps if they lowered the price they might get some....

;)

If their client tells them not to waste their time with offers below a certain level, then they don't have to pass those offers on.

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Seriously, right? If so then good... my girlfriend wasn't too sure. In my opinion it's common sense if you want to go ahead and strike a deal (not that I'm about to!).

Mind you the seller might not want to speak to you.

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haha, totally deluded isn't it pricing the gaff 10k over the stamp duty.

... like the idea of an email campaign. Can we all do it ;)

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I'd take it as meaning "There's been no offers thus far"

Standard practice in England-shire (where Your Move have more offices?) for repossessions is, when an offer is received, to advertise the amount in the local press and invite others to top that offer. I think this is an extension of this, telling the public that the property is open for the first offer to be made.

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  • 311 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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