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Four Best Methods For Off-The-Grid Food Production


Scott Sando

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'For most of us producing all of our own food is just a fantasy. It evokes visions of multiple acres of fertile land, long work days, and expensive machinery. However, none of these are necessary to achieve self-sufficient food production.

There are many gardening techniques that can produce an abundance of food for you and your family without requiring a lot of space, money or equipment. What each of these methods will require is your time, but not the dawn-to-dusk work hours associated with farming.'
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You can grow potatoes in tyres on a patio if you wish, as the tops come through add more soil and another tyre......cut the sprouting potatoes into smaller pieces when you plant, so that each piece has a growing shoot and they will go further.

potatoes1.jpg

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You can grow potatoes in tyres on a patio if you wish, as the tops come through add more soil and another tyre......cut the sprouting potatoes into smaller pieces when you plant, so that each piece has a growing shoot and they will go further.

potatoes1.jpg

You can grow spuds in a bucket, doesnt mean that you get many or anything worth eating though.

Just because they grow doesnt mean that it is the way to grow them.

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You can grow spuds in a bucket, doesnt mean that you get many or anything worth eating though.

Just because they grow doesnt mean that it is the way to grow them.

You can grow them any way you want to in a bin bag if you so desire....I forgot to say only use proper seed potatoes not ones you buy to eat.....the thing with tyres is you can add them as you pile up the soil as they grow.

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You can grow potatoes in tyres on a patio if you wish, as the tops come through add more soil and another tyre......cut the sprouting potatoes into smaller pieces when you plant, so that each piece has a growing shoot and they will go further.

potatoes1.jpg

I tried this method 2 years running and found I got alot of stalk and roots but very little in the way of potatoes.

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I tried this method 2 years running and found I got alot of stalk and roots but very little in the way of potatoes.

There is that.....one year had a very low crop, don't know if it was the weather, the soil or the variety of potatoes used......the same with tomatoes, one year got blight on the lot, another year the crop was abundant.

This growing your own is always going to be a bit of hit and miss....every year more lessons are learned, hopefully it will become more hits and less miss over time. ;)

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And when you fancy a spud take the top tyre off.

The best self storage you can get is leaving them in the ground.

I'm not too keen on using tyres though, what crap do they give off which can get into the spud?

I thought that also, so I would say only use well weathered tyres.

This year I am not doing potatoes....... ;)

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Had grand plans this year but movign to a house with a postage stamp for a yard so in a quandry. Will probably stick to the VFM stuff like herbs and salad greens.

Seen sacks for toms and pots in the pound shop this year so might use a few of those in the yard for a few toms and maybe courgettes/aubergines.

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I tried this method 2 years running and found I got alot of stalk and roots but very little in the way of potatoes.

Probably not enough water. Also heat stress may have caused leafy growth.

I've tried growing potatoes in sacks. After harvesting the first earlies and having a disappointing yield I increased the watering and the second earlies and maincrop potatoes increased their yield. If I do them in sacks again I shall fill a couple of tubes with gravel to ensure enough water gets down deep. Half the lack of water problem I had was that the top part of the soil was absorbing all the water (which then evaporated during the hot days) and very little was getting deep enough to provide enough for the whole plant.

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Onion sets from the pound shop do well in the little plastic troughs. I lift them at scallion size. If they look like bolting I just lift the lot and freeze them. Also lettuce and parsley do well in the troughs for little cost.

I had decent success with lettuce last year (but clashed with my veg box delivery - similar type, lesson learned), limited with my flat parsley and coriander as my wife tended to strip the plants rather than leave some to keep growing, another lesson learned for this year. For the cost of those salad bags and herbs it makes sense to keep to these with limited space.

My strawbs were left out in the snow all winter. Currently mostly brown with a few green leaves. No idea if I killed them or not :lol:

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My strawbs were left out in the snow all winter. Currently mostly brown with a few green leaves. No idea if I killed them or not :lol:

You'd be doing well if you can manage to kill a strawberry. You can stick 'em in the freezer for a while, take them out and plant them and they'll do fine. Having said that it's worth cutting off the old leaves each autumn and removing them from the strawberry bed as they can harbour pests / diseases.

Plants are amazing things really. They want to grow. It's what they do. It's all they do.

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My strawbs were left out in the snow all winter. Currently mostly brown with a few green leaves. No idea if I killed them or not :lol:

No, you didn't. That's normal and strawberries are tough. Just before the growing season, prune off the old brown leaves to prevent shading.

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