Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Unsafe As Houses

Modern Apprenticeships - Another Way Of Conning Young People

Recommended Posts

Friday rant from me: :)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/12404850

Apprenticeships are set for a record level of popularity in England, a group which organises the schemes says.

It's thought a record 350,000 people will sign up for an apprenticeship in England this year, twice as many as five years ago.

During an apprenticeship workers train for a qualification while doing the job.

Apprentices often go to college for a day or so each week too.

Currently, around one in four people who apply are accepted, according to the National Apprentice Service (NAS) in England.

The government is hoping to create 100,000 more positions by 2014.

Newsbeat's been speaking to people who have already signed up.

'McApprentice'

Marcus Collins is 24 and from St Albans.

He had a good job with a law firm, but was made redundant and spent 11 months out of work.

Marcus on his McDonald's apprenticeship

He ended up doing an apprenticeship at McDonald's.

"The first day was very stressful," he admits.

"You only have to go to McDonald's at 1pm on a Saturday to see how hard people work.

"It's 90 seconds to serve a customer, take their order, get their food. It's lots of miniature tasks done very quickly."

But Marcus stuck with the job and says it's been worth it.

"I wasn't sure if I'd be able to work so fast and that's one of the things the apprentice programme did - to increase my skills and my confidence.

"Everyone has their opinions about all sorts of jobs. As long as you enjoy what you do it doesn't matter what anyone else thinks."

-------------------

I worry that many Apprenticeships are yet another way of conning young people out of earning money to establish and develop a decent standard of living for themselves.

Traditionally, apprenticeships were undertaken to learn a semi-skilled or skilled trade. Working at McDonalds or Sainsbury's is not a semi-skilled trade - I speak from experience of working in both places in the 1990s as a student. Such 'apprenticeships' are just cheap labour - another strategy of big businesses to minimise further the cost of their staffs' wages.

We do need less young people going to university and more to undertake vocational training such as apprenticeships - but certain apprenticeships appear to me to be devised simply to exploit young people. My advice to any young person thinking of an apprenticeship would be to undertake an apprenticeship to learn skills that another person would not be able to pick up with relativey minimal effort - ignore fake-apprentices put on by supermarkets and fast food establishments!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Friday rant from me: :)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/12404850

Apprenticeships are set for a record level of popularity in England, a group which organises the schemes says.

It's thought a record 350,000 people will sign up for an apprenticeship in England this year, twice as many as five years ago.

During an apprenticeship workers train for a qualification while doing the job.

Apprentices often go to college for a day or so each week too.

Currently, around one in four people who apply are accepted, according to the National Apprentice Service (NAS) in England.

The government is hoping to create 100,000 more positions by 2014.

Newsbeat's been speaking to people who have already signed up.

'McApprentice'

Marcus Collins is 24 and from St Albans.

He had a good job with a law firm, but was made redundant and spent 11 months out of work.

Marcus on his McDonald's apprenticeship

He ended up doing an apprenticeship at McDonald's.

"The first day was very stressful," he admits.

"You only have to go to McDonald's at 1pm on a Saturday to see how hard people work.

"It's 90 seconds to serve a customer, take their order, get their food. It's lots of miniature tasks done very quickly."

But Marcus stuck with the job and says it's been worth it.

"I wasn't sure if I'd be able to work so fast and that's one of the things the apprentice programme did - to increase my skills and my confidence.

"Everyone has their opinions about all sorts of jobs. As long as you enjoy what you do it doesn't matter what anyone else thinks."

-------------------

I worry that many Apprenticeships are yet another way of conning young people out of earning money to establish and develop a decent standard of living for themselves.

Traditionally, apprenticeships were undertaken to learn a semi-skilled or skilled trade. Working at McDonalds or Sainsbury's is not a semi-skilled trade - I speak from experience of working in both places in the 1990s as a student. Such 'apprenticeships' are just cheap labour - another strategy of big businesses to minimise further the cost of their staffs' wages.

We do need less young people going to university and more to undertake vocational training such as apprenticeships - but certain apprenticeships appear to me to be devised simply to exploit young people. My advice to any young person thinking of an apprenticeship would be to undertake an apprenticeship to learn skills that another person would not be able to pick up with relativey minimal effort - ignore fake-apprentices put on by supermarkets and fast food establishments!!!

Easy solution - make apprenticeships in easy things short, say 1 year.

Carpentry or "real" trade apprenticeships to be 3 or 4 years.

Employer gets cheap labour for 1 year, kid learns to work every day(which is actually the hardest adjustment to make as I recall).

However this won't hide unemployment, so I imagine the government will take whatever option does that the best. Fancy a 4-year apprenticeship learning to flip burgers?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Easy solution - make apprenticeships in easy things short, say 1 year.

Carpentry or "real" trade apprenticeships to be 3 or 4 years.

Employer gets cheap labour for 1 year, kid learns to work every day(which is actually the hardest adjustment to make as I recall).

However this won't hide unemployment, so I imagine the government will take whatever option does that the best. Fancy a 4-year apprenticeship learning to flip burgers?

Working in fast-food and supermarkets is already cheap labour - but with apprenticeships in these vocations it's set to become even cheaper. It's just a way of squeezing the young and working poor, and as you say, massaging the unemployment figures. Big business will feel able to take on more 'apprentices' than workers so there will be less unemployed. Everyone's a winner! :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I caught it on radio 1 that one apprecentice was earning about £5k a year or £2ph and this was for a supermarket.

That's shocking. The minimum wage isn't enough to live on independently, never mind a so-called 'supermarket apprentice' wage.I was earning about £2.80-ish an hour when I worked for a supermarket - in 1997. I didn't thnk it possible but the young are even more screwed than my generation (I'm 32). :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 311 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.