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Shapps Latest Missive

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On the front page of his website, so it might be worthing commenting there.

http://www.shapps.com/2011/02/housing-policies/

Housing

Having a home that meets people’s needs is fundamental to helping people achieving their aspirations for themselves, their families and their communities.

What the Government will achieve

* Increase the number of houses available to buy and rent

* Make sure that social housing helps people stand on their own two feet

* Protect the vulnerable and disadvantaged

* Make sure that homes are of high quality and sustainable.

Over the next four years we are investing over £13bn of taxpayers money in housing. This includes over £2bn to make existing social homes decent, £4.5bn to fund new affordable homes and £6.5bn in the Supporting People programme.

Building more homes

For many years, too few homes have been built in this country. This has led to unsustainable price increases which means people are locked out of the housing market by unaffordable prices, unattainable mortgages and high rents.

To change this we will provide a powerful incentive to build new homes, streamline the planning system and remove unnecessary regulation. The New Homes Bonus will mean that communities will see the benefit of welcoming new homes. We will return decision-making powers on housing and planning to local communities. The Community Right to Build will streamline arrangements where there is local support through neighbourhood planning and the Home on the Farm scheme will encourage farmers to convert existing buildings into affordable housing.

Together with existing contractual commitments, bringing empty homes back into use and the new delivery model Affordable Rent up to 150,000 new affordable homes will be built over the next four years.

This will help create a market that sees a steady but slow rise in house prices and which is freed from the unnecessary cost and inconvenience of Home Information Packs that have been abolished.

Social Housing Reform

The Government will make sure that the public gets value for money from the funds it invests in housing for people who need help in meeting their needs.

From now on we will give local authorities and social landlords the freedom to make sure people who are given a home funded by the public’s money are getting a hand up not a hand out. When (and if) they are ready to make provision for themselves by renting in the private sector or buying their own home they should be helped to do so. This will mean that someone else in need of a publicly funded home can move in.

The rights of existing council and Housing Association tenants are guaranteed and we will give all residents more say in how their homes are managed.

We will make it easier for social tenants to move by establishing a national home swap scheme. This will help people move more easily to find work. We will also ensure that social housing and welfare reforms work in tandem to make sure its worthwhile to work.

Protecting the vulnerable and disadvantaged

The Government is committed to tackling homelessness and to protecting the most vulnerable. The levels of Homelessness grant has been maintained with investment of £400m over the next four years.

Homelessness legislation will continue to provide an important safety net for people with a priority need who become homeless through no fault of their own. Families with dependant children, and vulnerable young people will continue to have access to suitable accommodation.

We have set up a cross departmental Ministerial Working Group that makes sure that all relevant government departments work in partnership with local authorities, charities and other organisations, to tackle homelessness and end rough sleeping.

In addition we are continuing our capital funding for Disabled Facilities Grants in line with the Coalition’s commitment to help people live at home for longer through home adaptations. We also have committed £6.5bn investment over the next four years in Supporting People programme. Local Authorities will have more control over how this money is allocated.

By sound management of the economy and funding for specific help for people who are in danger of not being able to meet their mortgage repayments we will keep repossessions to a minimum

High quality and environmentally sustainable homes

The Government will help make sure that all homes meet the minimum standards necessary to reduce their impact on the environment. Plans are in place for the greening of existing homes through a “green deal” which helps spread the upfront cost of investing in energy efficiency by offsetting against energy bill savings

We will also support communities in their desire to take the lead in shaping new developments in their area and their wish to see higher standards of design and sustainability.

Promoting high quality design and emphasising the importance of shared space as part of a thriving community. A place for Big Society to grow.

£2bn will be available to make social homes reach the decent homes standard but, in the longer term, we are reforming the system of council housing financing so that local authorities have control over how they improve the quality of the homes they own and the service they offer their tenants.

Edited by FaFa!

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I think they should stop building bigger houses for larger families. It's got to be your own choice to have hundreds of kids... if you can't house then then the state shouldn't be expected to.

£4.5bn to fund new affordable homes is not enough when they spend over £200k building them. (through nice developers of course)

So they need to make that money go further by paying a lot less for them.

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Spending tax payers money on housing? Aaargh!!!!

The policy should be.

1) Prosecute those involved in liar loans.

2) Maintain a planning policy.

3) Maintain a land registry.

4) Abolish SMI.

5) Sell off all council housing to the highest bidder.

6) Replace all benefits, with perhaps the exception of a disability benefit, bu including HB, with a citizens income.

That is about it. Do that and then leave everything well alone.

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I think they should stop building bigger houses for larger families. It's got to be your own choice to have hundreds of kids... if you can't house then then the state shouldn't be expected to.

£4.5bn to fund new affordable homes is not enough when they spend over £200k building them. (through nice developers of course)

So they need to make that money go further by paying a lot less for them.

The tax they take from you to make homes affordable, makes them unaffordable.

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Big problem. Difficult to argue that you are not punishing the child for their parent's decisions if you go down this route.

There is no right and wrong on this just less than desirable decisions.

Owner occupiers don't get help if they have more kids than they can fit in their house.

And do you think it's self-defeating to put people in to bigger home as they see they get rewarded for breeding?

Edited by SarahBell

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Big problem. Difficult to argue that you are not punishing the child for their parent's decisions if you go down this route.

I have some sympathy for your position, but ultimately kids always carry the can for their parents' decisions, be they good, bad or indifferent. You could equally argue children are better off with two parents on the dole than two parents in minimum wage work as at least the dolies will always be at home and able to keep a better eye on the kids. The argument revolves around the state's direct responsibility for the living standards of its citizenry. I think the real issue lies in the fact a system has been created where large sections of the poor in this country have essentially become rent seekers due to the fact they are better off on the dole than in work.

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http://www.shapps.com/2011/02/housing-policies/

For many years, too few homes have been built in this country. This has led to unsustainable price increases which means people are locked out of the housing market by unaffordable prices, unattainable mortgages and high rents.

Understanding FAIL!

This will help create a market that sees a steady but slow rise in house prices and which is freed from the unnecessary cost and inconvenience of Home Information Packs that have been abolished.

Desirable objective FAIL!

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I should also add that Shapps like the true politician is trying to keep everyone happy.

That at the end of the day, is simply not possible.

He is presiding over inter generational war as well as a war between the haves and have nots.

Yep definitely trying to play on both sides of the fence ,but sooner or later he will have to choose just one and that's where the problem `s start

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This will help create a market that sees a steady but slow rise in house prices and which is freed from the unnecessary cost and inconvenience of Home Information Packs that have been abolished.

He said yesterday that prices were too high!!

Edited by Constable

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I should also add that Shapps like the true politician is trying to keep everyone happy.

That at the end of the day, is simply not possible.

He is presiding over inter generational war as well as a war between the haves and have nots.

Good synopsis.

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I think the complaint is that giving bigger houses to bigger families also goes on. So no change there. Moral hazard everywhere because that is lazy government and the path of least resistance.

Perhaps (like Switzerland I believe) all legislation should have to pass a moral hazard test.

Does accepting deposits from crooked leaders who have robbed their own nation, and worldwide tax dodgers and mafia bosses, pass the moral hazard test?

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Owner occupiers don't get help if they have more kids than they can fit in their house.

And do you think it's self-defeating to put people in to bigger home as they see they get rewarded for breeding?

The problem is a lack of breeding. Of the right people. The state needs the next generation. A one child policy would have our country in collapse in 20 years. We need good people to have 3 children, and the crap people to be sterilised. Sorry i couldnt be bothered being PC anymore.

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Grantley Chapps Multicoloured National Home Swap Shop. I knew he looked familiar.............

So, he's failed to notice the tens of thousands of existing empty homes, many of them built in the last decade, he thinks the problem is not enough new building and is going to bung his developer chums lots of £billions to knock up some more! He should be advising the Irish!

He's not mentioned the banks once in terms of prices. No suprise there since Dave says we must 'move on'.

It's the usual motherhood and apple pie sound bite sh1te aimed to distract attention for another 4 years whilst Lloyds get themselves recapped and start again.

Wolf in Shapps clothing.

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don't like the idea of the millions for upgrading social housing. It will work out as 1) Dreadfully run housing associations pissing money up the wall with badly done repairs...2) "social" landlords with contracts with councils who are really shark BTLers getting government money to do up their properties and profiting from this themselves

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I should also add that Shapps like the true politician is trying to keep everyone happy.

That at the end of the day, is simply not possible.

He is presiding over inter generational war as well as a war between the haves and have nots.

The intergenerational war concept is an interesting one, however it seems to me that few people understand that the housing ponzi is a massive integenerational wealth transfer. Most people that I speak to just simple don't understand the system well enough to realise they are the benefactors or beneficiaries in this system.

I'm encouraged to see more and more comments on forums and newpaper articles on this, but it really is a trickle.

I've started writing an article to try to put my perspective on the situation into simple to understand abstract terms, something that can be easily digested that can highlight the core concepts of how this wealth transfer takes place.

I honestly believe that if you can strip out the noise and complexities of the argument, boil it down to the fundamentals, they would be aghast at their involvement in the system.

I am trying to write an article that sets the foundation of how the market works, in abstract terms, and then effectively asks (and answers) the question "Where do you think the profit from your house comes from? It comes from your children, maybe not directly, but by proxy, if you bought for 3x salary and sold at 6x salary, you are asking your child to pay a heavy price to provide you this profit, and to keep the system going I would likewise be expect to ask for more from my own children, perhaps I need to ask them for 12x salary, and the grandchildrenn, perhaps 24x? It isn't wealth generation, it is intergenerational theft. I don't want this to happen to my descendants and so I will protest against this Ponzi scheme now".

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He said yesterday that prices were too high!!

inflation is the aim of bankers.

without it, they cant, as a whole, make a profit...they would have to compete with each other...they would see friends nailed to skidrow.

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'make sure that social tenants stand on their own two feet'

....by putting rents up by 7% a year and by doing so drive all council tenants towards Housing Benefit?

Think again Shapps.

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The problem is a lack of breeding. Of the right people. The state needs the next generation. A one child policy would have our country in collapse in 20 years. We need good people to have 3 children, and the crap people to be sterilised. Sorry i couldnt be bothered being PC anymore.

Please define 'good people' for us.

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The intergenerational war concept is an interesting one, however it seems to me that few people understand that the housing ponzi is a massive integenerational wealth transfer. Most people that I speak to just simple don't understand the system well enough to realise they are the benefactors or beneficiaries in this system.

I'm encouraged to see more and more comments on forums and newpaper articles on this, but it really is a trickle.

I've started writing an article to try to put my perspective on the situation into simple to understand abstract terms, something that can be easily digested that can highlight the core concepts of how this wealth transfer takes place.

I honestly believe that if you can strip out the noise and complexities of the argument, boil it down to the fundamentals, they would be aghast at their involvement in the system.

I am trying to write an article that sets the foundation of how the market works, in abstract terms, and then effectively asks (and answers) the question "Where do you think the profit from your house comes from? It comes from your children, maybe not directly, but by proxy, if you bought for 3x salary and sold at 6x salary, you are asking your child to pay a heavy price to provide you this profit, and to keep the system going I would likewise be expect to ask for more from my own children, perhaps I need to ask them for 12x salary, and the grandchildrenn, perhaps 24x? It isn't wealth generation, it is intergenerational theft. I don't want this to happen to my descendants and so I will protest against this Ponzi scheme now".

The rise in house prices this decade was a bubble. As Jeremy Grantham points out, all bubbles in history have burst eventually and have always reverted to their long term trend. There are only 2 existing bubbles which have yet to burst and those are the UK and Australian housing markets

Second part of this paper (Btw, note the S&P500 2000 bubble which was temporarily prevented from bursting fully in 2001/2 when Greenspan flooded the world with liquidity following 9/11. All that happened was the bust was deferred until 2008/9 when it reverted to the pre-bubble trend

http://www.gmo.com/w...sBulls_4Q10.pdf

There's a difference between a permanent wealth transfer and a temporary asset price bubble whether it's stocks, houses, gold or anything else. I'm not convinced age has much to do with it. It depends largely on luck as to which, if any, bubble comes along at whichever age you happen to be and what if anything you decide to do about it. There are probably more losers on the way down than there are winners on the way up. We haven't got to the end just yet to fully see this.

Edit: Interestingly, Grantham has used the median house price / median family income to express the US housing bubble. I'm not sure where that puts us on the UK (or Aus) housing bubble, but it would probably make for an interesting chart! The US bubble peaking in '06 perhaps a year or so ahead of the UK top? Grantham also states that bubbles last an average of 3.5 years on the way up and 3 years on the way down which seems to tie in with the US but not the UK where our negative real rates, SLS scheme, bank recaps/equity stakes, and lowering of sterling appear to be acting to defer the final collapse (as we know).

Edited by Red Karma

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The rise in house prices this decade was a bubble. As Jeremy Grantham points out, all bubbles in history have burst eventually and have always reverted to their long term trend. There are only 2 existing bubbles which have yet to burst and those are the UK and Australian housing markets

Second part of this paper (Btw, note the S&P500 2000 bubble which was temporarily prevented from bursting fully in 2001/2 when Greenspan flooded the world with liquidity following 9/11. All that happened was the bust was deferred until 2008/9 when it reverted to the pre-bubble trend

http://www.gmo.com/w...sBulls_4Q10.pdf

Great link, thanks.

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Interesting that he thinks we've not been building enough. My local council (Warrington) advised that as houses are apparently in oversupply, the only planning they will consider is 'affordable housing' (i.e. social rentals through a HA).

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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