Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
SarahBell

Libraries Or Woodland?

Recommended Posts

I find it impossible to argue for any cuts (apart from HB) while we give £billions to the EU, 100s of £billions to banksters, £7 billion to Ireland, 100s of £1000 to public sector Managers/directors etc etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I think we ought to chop the tress down and use the pulp to make paper then print loads of banners about the library closures then print loads of new books then....

Sorry I'm been silly.

I don't think so much uproar about libraries simply because of the advent of the internet. If you're an avid reader there're are some real bargain books out there and now with Kindle not so much need for them. The big research libraries won't close.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Selling forests doesn't seem to make sense. Why would anyone buy them without the aim of restricting access to them (making it private land or charging the public).

Does anyone really use libraries? Sure, they make kids run around them once in while (we all got made go from school), but has anyone ever really made use of them. Even back in the 80s they were rubbish. Now with the internet etc, I really don't see the point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find it impossible to argue for any cuts (apart from HB) while we give £billions to the EU, 100s of £billions to banksters, £7 billion to Ireland, 100s of £1000 to public sector Managers/directors etc etc.

I want the cuts and out of the above too.

They arent opposites.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...as long as we are reducing waste from the public purse I will be happy ....Local Authority 'CEOs' and 'Directors' salaries should be slashed to avoid closures of Library Services....streamlining of Libraries ...no problem....ours recently went Automated ...no more stamping books and handing them back ..you book them out on the system and back in for return and then stack them in the returned shelves yourself...very efficient .....let's squash the luddites....... :rolleyes:

Edited by South Lorne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Save the trees.....why can't libraries be run from local schools, all then get to benefit...I like the do it yourself idea, scan it and stack it...if supermarkets can libraries can. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's something about the symbolism of selling off ancient national forests to pay down debt that doesn't sit right, and makes it feel worse than the libraries.

It's like something you'd hear about a South American banana republic doing, but could never imagine we'd have to stoop that low.

Edited by Britney's Piers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Selling forests doesn't seem to make sense. Why would anyone buy them without the aim of restricting access to them (making it private land or charging the public).

Does anyone really use libraries? Sure, they make kids run around them once in while (we all got made go from school), but has anyone ever really made use of them. Even back in the 80s they were rubbish. Now with the internet etc, I really don't see the point.

The majority of Forestry Commission land is working forest on land which is privately owned and rented to the FC under restrictive leases; these preclude public access and recreational use anyway - if the lease is sold to a third party or back to the landowner then a) planning permission would be required for a change of use and bodies like Natural England would object, b ) any trees cut down would have to be replanted under the terms of a felling licence from the Govt and c) rights of way would be unaffected because they have legal protection. The chances of any major change in the usage and access patterns are fairly slim, tbh.

It baffles me that people think we still need the Government to intervene in the timber market and make sure that we have enough for pit props and wartime trenches, which is why the FC was set up in the first place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

huge uproar about woodland closures... not so much about libraries...

there have been lots of protests at library closures and quite a bit of media coverage on them. The most popular version seems to be to get as many local people as possible to get their limit of books (usually 20) out of the library in order to completely empty the shelves. This does have a certain visual impact, as local papers are quite keen to get a photo of the desolate library as a heavy handed metaphor for the cuts and subsequent reductions in services.

Personally I use the library a lot. We take my young son there to choose four or five new books a week (he's only one and loves picture books) and then swap them each week. Most children's books are in the £5.99 or more category, even the picture books, and the charity shops around here seem to charge at least £1.50 each. When you get through them at the rate he does, then it makes a lot of sense to borrow them from the library.

My wife always has a novel on the go from the library and a couple of non-fictions (cookery etc)

And I spent all day in there on Wednesday researching. I'm a freelance illustrator and the range of work I need to produce means that I'd be penniless if I actually purchased all of the reference books on all the different subjects that I illustrate! (might only need to read a few chapters on an obscure topic for a single illustration. I do use the internet for a lot of research but is is very handy to be able to get down from the shelves a 1978 book of comic book illustration by Art Spiegelman, a 1955 book of nursery rhyme origins and a book on British clothing from the inter-war period and have them all open on the desk at the same time.

OK, so I admit that may not be typical family usage!

Also it keeps the other nutters off the streets as well. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I think we ought to chop the tress down and use the pulp to make paper then print loads of banners about the library closures then print loads of new books then....

I have a better idea.

1:)Chop the trees down

2:)Fashion the logs into giant dildos

3:)Shove 'em up the banksters arses

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

huge uproar about woodland closures... not so much about libraries...

I don't think we have a choice. But we shouldn't be selling public woodland or closing libaries.

We need more open space not less and the fact that out liberied are not used is a sad reflection of our society.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If either campaign is successful in limiting the scale of the cuts/sell off. I strongly suspect, five years hence, there'll be a small news report about how visitor numbers to both are miniscule.

The two campaigns are interesting when juxtaposed.

One is to save the forests from providing profits to rich industrialists. The other is to save an institution started and funded by the profits of a rich industrialist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be honest it would probably be cheaper to give people free books when they want to read one rather than run the public libraries. I would like to see the sums and usage stats.

Would be interesting. I'd guess with wages, rent etc, the total cost per book that's lent and fully read is very high.

The future is surely kindle type things for out of print books and a cheaper way of distributing text books in school?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Save the trees.....why can't libraries be run from local schools, all then get to benefit...I like the do it yourself idea, scan it and stack it...if supermarkets can libraries can. ;)

Or from other local offices.

There must be ways of making the library service cheaper by better use of buildings. But the problem is that unless you can find someone else to rent a building, closing it doesn't save any money unless you sack the staff as well.

tim

Edited by tim123

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woodland is more important to me. Libraries should be consigned to history. I am willing to bet 90% of the books held in them never get loaned out 99.9% of the time so they would do better having those ones available from only a few depots in the country creating an on-line government run library that could post them out on demand. The popular books can then be made available through other council outlets and churches.

For the rest of us there is Amazon. If I want a book I can get it delivered to my door for circa £4 all in!!! Saves a 16mile round trip to the nearest library that would cost me about the same anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Public libraries are perhaps the best loved of local authority services. There have been big campaigns to save the drastic cuts in many areas. There has also been a lot of coverage on local news.

At some time in the future, e-books may well eat into the market share of libraries and bookshops. But that's not happening at the moment, library use hasn't fallen much from its peak. If and when use does start to plummet in the face of electronic media, then maybe the library will have had its day, but that hasn't happened yet.

Forests: The Forestry Commission might originally have been a state enterprise whose primary function was timber production, but its forests have now become important public amenities and the FC have granted permanent public access, apart from restrictions when forestry work is in progress. If it is sold to conservation bodies like the Woodland Trust or National Trust, all well and good, but I can't see those organisations having the cash to buy more than a small proportion of the FC's land.

I am willing to bet 90% of the books held in them never get loaned out 99.9% of the time
I think you'd lose your bet as you obviously have absolutely no idea what you're talking about! Edited by Hyperduck Quack Quack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you'll find they are very much a minority pasttime. Less than half the population read a book each year. Probably once more a subsidy for the better off in many cases - and they argue so persuasively that it is to 'give poor access'.

I hate to be cynical - but that's the way I am. Oh and they are repositories of disease too. :D

It depends where you live. If it's an area with a good library, good staff, reasonable books and a decent local authority, the library will be used more than somewhere where there's a tatty library, miserable staff, grubby old books and and an unpopular council. Edited by Hyperduck Quack Quack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Public libraries are perhaps the best loved of local authority services. There have been big campaigns to save the drastic cuts in many areas. There has also been a lot of coverage on local news.

At some time in the future, e-books may well eat into the market share of libraries and bookshops. But that's not happening at the moment, library use hasn't fallen much from its peak. If and when use does start to plummet in the face of electronic media, then maybe the library will have had its day, but that hasn't happened yet.

Forests: The Forestry Commission might originally have been a state enterprise whose primary function was timber production, but its forests have now become important public amenities and the FC have granted permanent public access, apart from restrictions when forestry work is in progress. If it is sold to conservation bodies like the Woodland Trust or National Trust, all well and good, but I can't see those organisations having the cash to buy more than a small proportion of the FC's land.

I think you'd lose your bet as you obviously have absolutely no idea what you're talking about!

The Woodland Trust have stated they're not that interested in it anyway if it's just pine plantation.

People certainly don't use the mobile libraries. It comes and parks in my village and the staff onboard eye's light up when someone approaches, only for them to walk straight past to pick their kids up from school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends where you live. If it's an area with a good library, good staff, reasonable books and a decent local authority, the library will be used more than somewhere where there's a tatty library, miserable staff, grubby old books and and an unpopular council.

Sure it's not how close it is to a good-sized free car park?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.