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One Million Rented Homes In England 'are Dangerous'

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-12371904

One million rented homes in England 'are dangerous'

Around one million privately let homes in England are so substandard they are dangerous, the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health (CIEH) has said.

The organisation has warned those figures are set to rise, citing a lack of social housing, and cuts to housing benefit and legal aid.

Councils say they are doing what they can to tackle the problem but argue clear, workable legislation is needed.

The government said more red tape would harm tenants' interests.

Local authorities in England have said their hands are tied because proposals they thought were going to help the situation - such as a national landlords' register - have been scrapped by the coalition government.

The CIEH said unscrupulous landlords were exploiting the lack of rented accommodation, and there were fears that cuts to housing benefit could make the situation worse and force tenants to live in unsafe buildings, often with exposed electrics, mould and damp.

The number is expected to rise due to people not being able to afford to buy homes, while local authorities push people into the private rented sector as they try to tackle waiting lists for social housing.

Chairman of Local Government Regulation, Councillor Paul Bettison, said there was "clear evidence" that councils were cracking down on rogue landlords.

"However, at a time when councils are facing the worst financial settlement in living memory, having clearer and more workable legislation would be beneficial.

"With the limited resources available to councils at present, the introduction of a national landlord register would certainly help councils further in tracing those breaking the law."

The BBC's Keith Doyle said government figures showed 1.5 million - nearly half of all privately rented homes in England - were substandard, with one million classified as dangerous to live in.

A Communities and Local Government spokesperson said ministers believed the current system struck "the right balance between the rights and responsibilities of tenants and landlords".

"Tying the whole sector down in red tape will harm tenants' interests by pushing up rents and reducing the choice of properties to rent.

"Councils have a wide range of powers at their disposal to tackle the minority of rogue landlords who fail in their responsibilities.

"We are working with them, to ensure that any barriers to their using those powers, are lifted," they added.

While there is no central regulation system for private landlords in England, Scotland has landlord registration, designed to help councils monitor private landlords and ensure that they are suitable people to let out property.

Failing to apply to the local council for registration is a criminal offence, but last year charity Shelter Scotland said rogue landlords were continuing to operate three years after the scheme was introduced, with one in four rented properities not registered.

The Welsh Assembly Government has powers over housing through the Local Government and Housing Legislative Competence Order (LCO), which was given Royal Assent last year.

Incidentally, in the latest report on the condition of housing in England I could find, in the private rented sector, 54.6% of homes were of a 'decent' standard and 45.4% were not.

http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/corporate/statistics/ehcs2007annualreport

Scotland's figures don't come in the same format, but under the heading 'Presence of disrepair', in 77% of the private rented sector there was some disrepair, and in 23% there was none.

I can't find any figures for Wales.

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How many mortgaged homes are dangerous? :blink:

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-12371904

Incidentally, in the latest report on the condition of housing in England I could find, in the private rented sector, 54.6% of homes were of a 'decent' standard and 45.4% were not.

http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/corporate/statistics/ehcs2007annualreport

Scotland's figures don't come in the same format, but under the heading 'Presence of disrepair', in 77% of the private rented sector there was some disrepair, and in 23% there was none.

I can't find any figures for Wales.

2000-2010 - the deacde of the slumlords and banksters.

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I think a mass of people 'doing up' houses, when they don't actually know what they are doing, could be one cause.

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I think a mass of people 'doing up' houses, when they don't actually know what they are doing, could be one cause.

Yes, that was my thinking !

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How many mortgaged homes are dangerous? :blink:

Impossible to tell from the figures I can find. As for substandard properties, 34.1% of owner-occupied homes in England were non-decent in the 2007 report, but a good proportion of those would have been owned outright by people over 65 who might struggle to afford repairs.

But the point is, if you own a property, even with a mortgage, repairing it is your choice.

If you're a tenant, the conditiion of the property is the landlord's responsibility.

Tenants can try to find a property to rent that isn't dangerous, or even one of a decent standard, but the percentages and numbers (3 million households in privated rented accommodation, 2007 figures, and one million privately rented homes that are dangerous) suggest that many will fail.

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Impossible to tell from the figures I can find. As for substandard properties, 34.1% of owner-occupied homes in England were non-decent in the 2007 report, but a good proportion of those would have been owned outright by people over 65 who might struggle to afford repairs.

But the point is, if you own a property, even with a mortgage, repairing it is your choice.

If you're a tenant, the conditiion of the property is the landlord's responsibility.

Tenants can try to find a property to rent that isn't dangerous, or even one of a decent standard, but the percentages and numbers (3 million households in privated rented accommodation, 2007 figures, and one million privately rented homes that are dangerous) suggest that many will fail.

But I suspect that they have set the barrier for "not dangerous", far too high.

E.g. I bet that they say that any house that doesn't have an RCD on the electric circuits is dangerous.

Whilst it may be very desirable that a house has this, not having it doesn't make a house inherently dangerous

tim

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knowing H+SE, they probably class as "dangerous", a two storey house with only one means of escape via ambulant staircase.

I am no more ceased to be amazed at the crazy fire escape requirements for places of work, where people are awake (well in the private sector thats true) needing two flights in many cases, one hour fire rating, electric, battery backed smoke detectors, illuminated signs and floor markings, yet in a house, where people sleep, little is needed, indeed a fire on the front door area at the staircase means curtains or broken legs for all.

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knowing H+SE, they probably class as "dangerous", a two storey house with only one means of escape via ambulant staircase.

I am no more ceased to be amazed at the crazy fire escape requirements for places of work, where people are awake (well in the private sector thats true) needing two flights in many cases, one hour fire rating, electric, battery backed smoke detectors, illuminated signs and floor markings, yet in a house, where people sleep, little is needed, indeed a fire on the front door area at the staircase means curtains or broken legs for all.

Interesting point.

Building regs now stipulate (in precis):

Emergency egress windows are required to all upper floor habitable rooms that are not more than 4.5m above ground level ie first floor windows

Each storey requires two alternative escape routes, if this is not possible a storey emergency egress window is to be provided

Also, with regard to storey emergency egress windows, the requirements are:

To be located remotely from escape route

Distance from bottom of window to eaves along slope of roof applies

Windows on upper storeys to be located to facilitate rescue by ladder

I would suggest that anyone viewing a property with a view to buying it might want to read through the new building regs, particulary on the subject of fire safety, and ask the agent or vendor whether the property complies with them.

Ditto anyone viewing a property to rent.

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Precisely! The housing stock of the UK is a national disgrace.

......when times are bad people will spend less on their homes and investments...when property prices are falling they will spend even less....... ;)

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I think 1 million is very conservative. I see death traps every day and landlords simply screw their face up when I condemn the heating and hot water systems. The next day they get some general do it all to bodge it up and remove the cap from the meter.

We also have to consider the decent homes act, how many rented homes will meet these standards.....i think very few.

Some homes are so littered with asbestos that it makes my job impossible. I had a customer with a leak under a tiled floor which he didn't want lifting....the alternative was going through an artex ceiling. He was shocked when I told him that I wouldn't be touching an artex ceiling until I had a full asbestos survey on the ceiling. Turns out that it contained 6% amosite.....it was removed by a skilled contractor for £7,300. Somehow I think it would have been cheaper to remove the bathroom floor tiles.

People don't realise whats in their homes

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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