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New Plan To Tackle Empty Homes

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SCARBOROUGH could face a financial penalty unless more empty homes are brought back into use councillors have been warned.

The issue was raised at a meeting of Scarborough Council’s Projects and Partnerships Overview and Scrutiny Committee on Monday.

Committee members were considering the council’s new Empty Homes Strategy 2001 to 2015.

The report revealed that in 2009 there were 1,869 empty homes – approximately 3.4 per cent of the total housing stock – and 702 of those had been empty for longer than six months.

John Burroughs, the council’s housing strategy and development officer, proposed that specific empty homes should be brought back into use and the outcome could affect the New Homes Bonus.

He said: “The bonus is supposed to act as an incentive to local councils to increase housing supply and included in that is empty homes.

“It’s about the overall number of empty homes and if we are able to reduce that figure we would get a bonus.

“However, if the converse happens, that negates the New Homes Bonus. There’s a clear need to take a proactive approach to this.”

Currently the council is carrying out an empty homes survey by writing to owners of properties and Mr Burroughs said the response was around 70 per cent.

He added that housing associations were interested in working with the council to tackle the problem.

“Two or three of them have already said they’d like to do so. We are also working with owners as managing agents and renting them out,” he said

The issue was highlighted as a concern because empty properties could attract vandalism as well as other anti-social behaviour.

Under the plan to tackle the empty homes problem it is hoped that at least 25 properties per year would be brought back in to use and, in addition, 15 empty homes would be brought back into use to provide temporary accommodation for the homeless – as a replacement for a former homeless hostel.

Cllr Mike Ward highlighted a caretaker scheme elsewhere in the country – where people live at the property at a reduced rent until it is sold – and said it might be worth looking into.

And Cllr Jane Mortimer said some properties in the area had stood empty for a lot longer than six months. She said: “I can name one in my ward that has been an eyesore for 30 years.”

http://www.whitbygazette.co.uk/community/new_plan_to_tackle_empty_homes_1_3011944

:angry:

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Funny...dreams meet reality. I work in the social housing sector and all week I've been working on properties that have been empty for some time. They are tinned up, damp, cold and need thousands of pounds spending just to make them habitable. Most of them have no copper or plumbing and many have lead flashing missing from the roofs. Months of water penetration have caused massive damage to the internal fabric of the building. Many have high levels of asbestos which makes working in them costly and time consuming as we are constantly getting possible ACMs checked / removed before we can start any work.

To bring many of these homes into the decent homes level as requested by the Government, you would also need to renew bathrooms, windows, doors, boilers. kitchens etc etc.

You are probably talking about an investment of between 10,000 and 40,000 per property and still even then most people on this forum wouldn't live in one.

I wish I had some photos to show you really wouldn't believe it. This country has masses of houses like this but the reality is it isn't economical to bring them back into stock. This government has failed to grasp that we need to bulldoze many estates and start again because housing associations no longer have the money to maintain them. Worse still because many banks are running wide of property there is no private money to fund new developments either.

This government really hasn't a clue.

Edited by dubsie

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This country has masses of houses like this but the reality is it isn't economical to bring them back into stock.

At the right price, there's lots of skilled handymen around that could bring those houses back into shape. When you do your own work during evenings/weekends and scrounge reclaimed materials from the classifieds, you'd be surprised at how cheaply you can fix up a house. May not be a dream home, but it beats living under a bridge or on welfare.

I support taxing empty houses as a way to motivate the owner to fix them up and get them occupied or sell to someone that will. In my mind, it's one of the easiest and most politically acceptable steps to helping address affordable housing.

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I support taxing empty houses as a way to motivate the owner to fix them up and get them occupied or sell to someone that will. In my mind, it's one of the easiest and most politically acceptable steps to helping address affordable housing.

With council waiting lists so high the councils should take them off the owners.

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To bring many of these homes into the decent homes level as requested by the Government, you would also need to renew bathrooms, windows, doors, boilers. kitchens etc etc.

You are probably talking about an investment of between 10,000 and 40,000 per property and still even then most people on this forum wouldn't live in one.

Cheaper to knock to knock it down and start again from the ground up.
With council waiting lists so high the councils should take them off the owners.
The fundamental concept of land ownership says you can't do this. If councils could, it would be game over for the property speculators. Property would have near zero value. The value of property comes from the fact that the government CAN'T just take it back.

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At the right price, there's lots of skilled handymen around that could bring those houses back into shape. When you do your own work during evenings/weekends and scrounge reclaimed materials from the classifieds, you'd be surprised at how cheaply you can fix up a house. May not be a dream home, but it beats living under a bridge or on welfare.

I support taxing empty houses as a way to motivate the owner to fix them up and get them occupied or sell to someone that will. In my mind, it's one of the easiest and most politically acceptable steps to helping address affordable housing.

ASBESTOS AND HEALTH AND SAFETY.........YOU CAN'T DO THIS ANYMORE. Most of the stock they are talking about are full of asbestos....from artex to flooring it needs professional removal which would cost millions. All that will happen is councils and housing associations will knock them down and sit on the land till things improve.

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  • 309 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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