Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
interestrateripoff

Ed Miliband: Young Have It Harder Than Parents

Recommended Posts

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/8302479/Ed-Miliband-young-have-it-harder-than-parents.html

The next generation will become the first to be less well-off than their parents, Ed Miliband will say today.

The Labour leader will make the claim as he pitches for support from what he believes is a young generation singled out by the Coalition to bear the brunt of spending cuts and reduced public services.

The Conservatives will respond by saying that Labour's economic legacy forced them into the cuts. David Cameron has also repeatedly highlighted Labour's failure to increase social mobility. But Mr Miliband will claim that the Coalition's cuts risk causing "inter-generational discrimination" and that there is a "real fear" that the next generation will be less prosperous than the last.

"We may not have given it a name in the way that Americans talk about the 'American Dream' but it is there nevertheless," he will say in a speech in Newcastle upon Tyne.

"It is defined by the promise that each generation will pass on to the next a life of greater opportunity, prosperity and happiness. But there is now a real and legitimate fear that the British promise will be broken and the next generation will have fewer opportunities and find it harder to get on than the last.”

Mr Miliband will point to policies such as the scrapping of the educational maintenance allowance in England for poorer 16 to 19 year-olds, which gave them money while studying.

A Labour source said: “Ed believes that this government is choosing weak, soft targets. They know that teenagers don’t vote and therefore taking away money from these people is the line of least resistance. Ed sees it as his job to stand up for these people.”

Mr Miliband will say: “We have always been about a society where the promise of Britain can go beyond the most affluent — that lower and middle income families can guarantee a better future for the kids.”

Critics will seize upon his refusal to blame Tony Blair and Gordon Brown for the failure to improve social mobility.

Perhaps someone needs ask Ed why all these cuts are needed, which party racked up the most debt ever to leave the young to pay it off for the rest of their lives, and then we get musing over why they are going to be worse off. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/8302479/Ed-Miliband-young-have-it-harder-than-parents.html

Perhaps someone needs ask Ed why all these cuts are needed, which party racked up the most debt ever to leave the young to pay it off for the rest of their lives, and then we get musing over why they are going to be worse off. :rolleyes:

Well of course the key Liebour line here will be that had nothing to do with them; the rather sad thing is most of their supporters are so thick and deluded they probably actually kid themselves that is the case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/8302479/Ed-Miliband-young-have-it-harder-than-parents.html

Perhaps someone needs ask Ed why all these cuts are needed, which party racked up the most debt ever to leave the young to pay it off for the rest of their lives, and then we get musing over why they are going to be worse off. :rolleyes:

They should stop moaning and just start paying off the debt that has been heaped on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps someone needs ask Ed why all these cuts are needed, which party racked up the most debt ever to leave the young to pay it off for the rest of their lives, and then we get musing over why they are going to be worse off. :rolleyes:

Pitiful isn't it <_<

They were an integral part of these problems for 13 years and now they're out of power, they explain them as if it was nothing to do with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the advantages of being in opposition is the ability to tell some truth. Living standards are falling and are going to fall quite spectacularly over the next 30 years. One of the disadvantages of being in opposition is the need to make it look like someone else's bad policy decision. Since Toff and Toffer are not actually cutting anything and government spending is going up the so-called "cuts" are a rather unfortunate media myth for folk to fixate on. The Tories will (as I have predicted) borrow and spend.

Brown's catastrophic misjudgement in believing the Thatcherite twaddle that underpinned "New" Labour and its lunatic belief in the "free market" and the Finance Sector exacerbated a problem that has been 40 years in the making. Voting in a teapot government was a pretty stupid move but the UK did it and now will pay the price. Brown and Blair made their party unelectable, all Cameron had to do was lie - his specialist subject. Milliband has a tough job ahead of him.

We have borrowed and spent the kid's money for 40 years. Now we must pay it back, with interest, plus find some to cover the other problems ignored - oil supply, climate problems, balance of payments deficit, crumbling infrastructure, lack of competitiveness globally, third rate education, structural unemployment, skills shortages, rampant corruption and of course the HPC favourite, lack of affordable housing.

Not to worry though. The UK's wonderful and insightful chancellor has a failure-proof plan. As he said we should follow the example of Eire. This, I feel, is exactly what we are doing :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the advantages of being in opposition is the ability to tell some truth. Living standards are falling and are going to fall quite spectacularly over the next 30 years. One of the disadvantages of being in opposition is the need to make it look like someone else's bad policy decision. Since Toff and Toffer are not actually cutting anything and government spending is going up the so-called "cuts" are a rather unfortunate media myth for folk to fixate on. The Tories will (as I have predicted) borrow and spend.

Brown's catastrophic misjudgement in believing the Thatcherite twaddle that underpinned "New" Labour and its lunatic belief in the "free market" and the Finance Sector exacerbated a problem that has been 40 years in the making. Voting in a teapot government was a pretty stupid move but the UK did it and now will pay the price. Brown and Blair made their party unelectable, all Cameron had to do was lie - his specialist subject. Milliband has a tough job ahead of him.

We have borrowed and spent the kid's money for 40 years. Now we must pay it back, with interest, plus find some to cover the other problems ignored - oil supply, climate problems, balance of payments deficit, crumbling infrastructure, lack of competitiveness globally, third rate education, structural unemployment, skills shortages, rampant corruption and of course the HPC favourite, lack of affordable housing.

Not to worry though. The UK's wonderful and insightful chancellor has a failure-proof plan. As he said we should follow the example of Eire. This, I feel, is exactly what we are doing :D

Excellent post. Bleak isn't it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.telegraph...an-parents.html

Perhaps someone needs ask Ed why all these cuts are needed, which party racked up the most debt ever to leave the young to pay it off for the rest of their lives, and then we get musing over why they are going to be worse off. :rolleyes:

why is it that Labour's policies always run out of the other people money ?????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps if we had a system whereby those who vote for a particular party get to pick up the tab.

Dangerous precedent there mate. Whatever next? Pro-abortionists paying for their own abortions? Promiscuous gay men paying for any HIV treatment they incur?

At least smokers pay a premium towards their distinctive healthcare.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the advantages of being in opposition is the ability to tell some truth. Living standards are falling and are going to fall quite spectacularly over the next 30 years. One of the disadvantages of being in opposition is the need to make it look like someone else's bad policy decision. Since Toff and Toffer are not actually cutting anything and government spending is going up the so-called "cuts" are a rather unfortunate media myth for folk to fixate on. The Tories will (as I have predicted) borrow and spend.

Brown's catastrophic misjudgement in believing the Thatcherite twaddle that underpinned "New" Labour and its lunatic belief in the "free market" and the Finance Sector exacerbated a problem that has been 40 years in the making. Voting in a teapot government was a pretty stupid move but the UK did it and now will pay the price. Brown and Blair made their party unelectable, all Cameron had to do was lie - his specialist subject. Milliband has a tough job ahead of him.

We have borrowed and spent the kid's money for 40 years. Now we must pay it back, with interest, plus find some to cover the other problems ignored - oil supply, climate problems, balance of payments deficit, crumbling infrastructure, lack of competitiveness globally, third rate education, structural unemployment, skills shortages, rampant corruption and of course the HPC favourite, lack of affordable housing.

Not to worry though. The UK's wonderful and insightful chancellor has a failure-proof plan. As he said we should follow the example of Eire. This, I feel, is exactly what we are doing :D

I was listening to Nick Clegg on the today program and he said it was mistakes made over the last 20 year or since the big bang.

2hours 10 minutes in http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/console/b00y2sf0/Today_04_02_2011

don't know how that will go down with his Tory friends. Found it funny how he couldn't say housing boom and bust

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well millibands parents seemed to have it fairly easy, his dad was a very wealthy communist trouble causer in Europe who chose to run away to the UK for refuge when the war started and leave the fighting to somebody else. Then proceeded to live the live of a champagne socialist in Hampstead while greasing his sons passage to oxford with his chummy comrades there ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well millibands parents seemed to have it fairly easy, his dad was a very wealthy communist trouble causer in Europe who chose to run away to the UK for refuge when the war started and leave the fighting to somebody else. Then proceeded to live the live of a champagne socialist in Hampstead while greasing his sons passage to oxford with his chummy comrades there ....

Indeed, 'man of the people' my a***.

It is hilarious how the Liebour types go on about Cameron's background; so Ed 'obese thug' Balls going to a slightly less expensive public school is meant to make us like him?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was listening to Nick Clegg on the today program and he said it was mistakes made over the last 20 year or since the big bang.

2hours 10 minutes in http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/console/b00y2sf0/Today_04_02_2011

don't know how that will go down with his Tory friends. Found it funny how he couldn't say housing boom and bust

Thanks for that.

At some point all political parties must face up to the simple fact that to make capitalism work requires regulation and management. The so called "free" or deregulated market does not work and when left to their own devices the financial wizz kids will simply steal money by ever more clever means. The Tories know this but have, by and large, been from the background that is part of the fraudsters rather than the victims. Clearly none of the parties can actually come out and tell the truth about how the system robs people blind. Mrs Thatcher's "light touch" and "trickle down" lies have finally come to be seen for what they were and yet still people cling to them as if they had worked instead of causing the second great depression (ongoing).

Neither Milliband, nor IMHO, the British people nor for that matter the wealthy holders of capital, have the backbone for a true solution. The real changes will come when rich people feel their position is under threat. The present government, made up of rich people, do not feel we are at that point YET. The systemic collapse is still there, Eire is so profoundly screwed it is hard to see it ever being anything other than a backwater nation for the next 200 years. The debt is like a cancer, eating at the whole of the West. The next notch down may be a very hard one or it might be just another salami slice. The direction will, however, remain constant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed, 'man of the people' my a***.

It is hilarious how the Liebour types go on about Cameron's background; so Ed 'obese thug' Balls going to a slightly less expensive public school is meant to make us like him?

Ed was obviously the favoured fag boy. His eyes have been permanently affected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'Tis glow ballism GATT/WTO wot done it.

It's a choice whether we offshore jobs to Chindia in return for disinflation or not.

It's not inevitable.

Labour/Toffs/Libdems have all been lying through their teeth to the public to appease their corporate and bankster masters for 30 years telling us it will enrich us all. It hasn't. It won't. The poor stay poor the rich get rich that's how it goes, everybody knows.

AGRESSIVE TRADE TARIFFS AND EXCHANGE CONTROLS IS THE ONLY WAY OUT OF THIS MESS.

(except for the banksters, corporatisists and their politician bagmen who will continue to impoverish all of us).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very depressing, but all true, imo.

However, the plus side is that we all have a tendency to see things from within the bubble. Remeber fifteen years ago being told to plan for the next 40 years as if war, depression,hyperinflation and the like would never happen again. I used to read Michael Burleigh's Third Reich and it sent a shiver down my spine.

'Burleigh slowly builds up a picture of a people desperate for identity and economic prosperity who, bit by bit, closed off their conscience as the price of their dreams. There was no one cathartic moment when Germany, under the Third Reich, lapsed from goodness into badness; rather there was an incremental realignment of a collective morality'

Ireland won't be basket case for hundreds of years.I'd guess something big will happen and the world will be a different place again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The labour government under the two Bs, were very good at spending money they didn't have...they were very good at wasting the money they didn't have...they were very good at pretending we were a rich and prosperous country with good manufacturing businesses producing things the rest of the world would want to buy and producing real productive growth...when all we really had was a huge expensive public sector and a financial sector that was as good at covering their tracks as they were.

For all the money spent on schools and eduction, we should by rights have the best educated and knowledgeable people in the world.....why is it then there are so many leaving the education system still unable to read or write properly and would not understand the percentage of a percentage, meaning we have to now import the knowledge we require to get out of this mess from overseas.....poor show. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lloyds now owns over 33% of the UK's residential mortgages. Acquired from HBOS. [Of which up to 80% could well have been liar loans. Self Cert mortgages according to senior insiders and whistleblowers at HBOS]

Labour purposefully inflated the House Price Bubble.

It is a criminal act, that the UK taxpayers who do not own property, should have to pay to recapitalise Banks like Lloyds via the bailouts. Without this recapitalisation, property prices would have plummeted back to their long term historic average affordability. Which would mean over 50% falls from peak prices.

So by stealing our Taxes, QE, keeping Interest Rates at the lowest they have ever been, we are in effect being forced to pay to keep everyone else's property massively overinflated. Keeping millions who are not on the housing ladder yet, from being able to afford their own property. That is complicated thievery. Implemented by Labour Party policies. Labour have transferred this debt onto millions of us, not yet on the ladder.

We have already been forced to waste tens of thousands of pounds in rent, paying off a liar loan landlord.

I truly hate the Labour Party.

And now, Labour stir hatred amongst the students against the coalition, over tuition fee debt.

Which pales in comparison to the largest debt anyone takes on in their working lifetime.

The purchase of a house.

They have purposefully set out to condemn us to a life of debt slavery.

Utter Utter Scum.

I am not working for another ten years to pay off someone elses mortgage and pension, and bankers bonuses.

Id like to see the Labour Party HQ burned to the ground. With some of the last cabinet inside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was listening to Nick Clegg on the today program and he said it was mistakes made over the last 20 year or since the big bang.

2hours 10 minutes in http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/console/b00y2sf0/Today_04_02_2011

don't know how that will go down with his Tory friends. Found it funny how he couldn't say housing boom and bust

What did Nick Clegg say about the unpayable pension promise the Lib-Dems made when they took up office? That one where pensions get increased by RPI, Pay Rises or 2.5%, whichever is greater?

That formula is guaranteed to rack up the tax bill for the nation over time as a proportion of the national income. It will become an unpayable bill, but in the meantime, it will be a burden for the younger generation to carry.

I wonder what Ed Military Band is proposing to do about this inter-generational problem? Sure, he has spotted the problem, but what are his solutions?

I will give you a clue Ed. Raise the pensionable age quickly. Legislate that no one in the public sector can earn more than the Prime Minister. Legislate that the everyone in the private sector must have their wages reduced by 10% if the average wage in the private sector is below that of the public sector. Eliminate all new pension entitlements to those working in the public sector, and scale back those entitlements already accrued, including for those already receiving them.

Do the above, and we might get some inter-generational fairness. It may seem extreme to many reading this, but unless we roll back the advances that the beneficiaries of government spending have gained over the last decade, the state wont be able to borrow anymore to pay its bills, those expecting a payout wont get anything, and in the meantime we are going to crush the productive life out of our young. And it appears to me that the Con-Dems are doing more young crushing than Gordon Brown would have dared to get away with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oil supply, climate problems,

Common shared problems for any highly developed country, no matter where. But likely excerbated by the UK/EIRE being a set of islands having short-sighted leadership.

crumbling infrastructure,

Mediocre in a lot of well treaded areas (potholes ahoy!) and occassionally catastrophic in outlaying regions (burst water pipes in Northern Ireland), but it doesn't seem quite as critical as in America (with huge freeway bridges collapsing, more severe under investment for four decades, half a continent of old infrastructure to maintain/fix, and one third of Detroit in literal ruins, etc).

third rate education,

We've got a reasonable education system and it is meaningless to properly quantify it, UK people are smarter than given credit for and why keep putting British people down? But our problems are the government trying to reach arbitary targets and the rougher students disproportionately causing grief in inner city schools.

structural unemployment, skills shortages

A big YES for the former, a NOT SO SURE about the latter, when people reasonably qualifications are now languishing on the dole.

Neither Milliband, nor IMHO, the British people nor for that matter the wealthy holders of capital, have the backbone for a true solution. The real changes will come when rich people feel their position is under threat. The present government, made up of rich people, do not feel we are at that point YET.

They should do.

Edited by Big Orange

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mercantilism for a better word. How does that avoid the beggar thy neighbour scenario?

Anti-mercantilism.

I'm all for competition. Competition based upon non-mercanitlist trade, innovation and productivity. That isn't what we have now or have had for the last 20 years.

The playinf field for labour has to be levelled. If we want and choose to have a balanced economy and welfare state, social protections, pensions and so forth then we impose tariffs and controls on those who wish to undercut us by exploiting their labour and offer no such social support.

At present we're locked into a race to the bottom determined by the billionaires, global corporatists and banksters who insist it is in our interests for labour to flow to the lowest cost area. Clearly that's nonsense.

Faced with that scenario, we have a choice. Suck it up (Labour/Tory policy) by finding bubbles to recylce their surpluses, or do something to fight back.

I'm in favour of British govts. acting in the interests of British people rather than Chindians, banksters and a handful of global corporatists who get fatter by the day through this scam.

GATT/WTO has done us a great deal of harm. Sadly Dave sat next to Peter Sutherland of Goldman Sachs last week in Davos and supported his argument that we need more globalism through Doha, and not less. These men are the problem, not the solution. The solution is to fight against our impoverishment not acquiesce to them. See what they did to Iceland and Ireland!

Edit: FWIW I think the US will finally 'get it' and do precisely this. Where they lead we eventually follow, but I suspect it will require a stroger leadership than Obama. It will require leadership that puts the US people first, above their bankster and corporatist elite and decides the best place for US capital is to be invested in the US. When this happens China will be in big trouble.

Edited by Red Karma

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing short of the fundamental reform of our debt-based, commercially issued money system will work.

Confronted by an impending life of debt slavery, an increasing number of smart young people are now seeing this:

http://www.positivemoney.org.uk/

This crucial question of the nature of the money system was not always so ignored as it is now.

It was at the core of US politics until the bankers' victory in 1913.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qIhDdST27g

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 311 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.