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150,000 Council Jobs Earmarked For Redundancy

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150,000 council jobs earmarked for redundancy

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/patrick-butler-cuts-blog/2011/feb/02/council-job-cuts-total-hits-150000

The number of jobs earmarked for redundancy by councils in the UK has risen to above 150,000, up 10,000 over the past week as councils begin to finalise cuts plans.

The latest figures compiled by the GMB union reflect formal notifications of "jobs at risk" made by 260 councils and authorities. A further 239 are expected to reveal the extent of job losses in the next few weeks, including 22 of Britain's biggest council employers.

The biggest cuts to emerge over the past few days were at: Rotherham council (893 jobs at risk); Wigan council (820); West Sussex county council (800); South Wales police authority (688); Wakefield council (504); Suffolk police authority (300); Westminster City council (250); Wiltshire county council (250); and Wandsworth council (210).

The jobs at risk total includes councils, police and fire authorities and national parks. It does not include "at risk" notifications made by charities, private companies contracted by the public sector, or NHS trusts.

Here's the GMB's regional job losses breakdown:

North East 9,214

North West 29,125

Yorkshire & The Humber 18,243

East Midlands 11,609

West Midlands 20,937

Eastern 9,829

London 14,590

South East 13,413

South West total 11,408

Wales total 1,858

Scotland total 9,833

Total all regions 150,059

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Is it wrong to have a wry smile about public sector workers losing their non jobs?

It is a necessary evil. It will be hard for these 150,000 individuals, but Brown over-inflated the public sector to unaffordable levels. It was / is his fault.

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I will believe it when it happens.

This kind of stuff reminds me of Hitler sitting in his bunker moving flags representing German armies on his map and believing that fully equipped, fully manned crack armies are about to come to his rescue.

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Is it wrong to have a wry smile about public sector workers losing their non jobs?

How many non-jobs are actually going, though? You only ever seem to hear about the front line, and usually the poorly paid, particularly emotive ones, like care workers.

Anybody heard of sackings in the sort of job nobody but the sackee is really going to miss?

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I've got a few suggestions of some of the council jobs that should be first in the queue:

  • roller disco coach
  • toothbrush adviser
  • trampoline coaches
  • skate park attendants
  • flower arrangers
  • befriending co-ordinator
  • street football co-ordinator
  • breastfeeding peer support co-ordinator
  • composting supervisor
  • sword bearer and mace bearer
  • chauffeur-butlers
  • falls prevention fitness adviser
  • cheerleading development officer
  • street mediator
  • part-time pianists

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Even with merely flat expenses, the government will have to lay off vast numbers of frontline workers on low wages. To make room for the generous wage and benefit increases of the non-jobbers and the endless management.

The Bloo Loo plan of giving 50% pay cuts on anything over 25k for everyone in the public sector would work far better. But I think we all knew that would never be the plan.

Because the state employs around 8 million people in Britain directly, even having to cut out 5% at the bottom every year to make room for those wage increases.. means 400,000 fired a year. (although most reductions wil be not replacing boomers as they retire).

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Excellent news for house prices in my area (north west).

Yep if you look at who is buying houses, about 98% of the time it is either govrnment workers or workers at the contractors to the government.

The lowly paid, temporary private sector worker is not going to be buying houses anytime soon.

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Even with merely flat expenses, the government will have to lay off vast numbers of frontline workers on low wages. To make room for the generous wage and benefit increases of the non-jobbers and the endless management.

Exactly. The jobs cut will be the frontline ones that will directly affect you and yours.

The corporate non-jobs will still be comfortably doing their consulting with customers and powerpoint presentations charting how much government cuts have damaged frontline services whilst remaining securely in their jobs.

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Exactly. The jobs cut will be the frontline ones that will directly affect you and yours.

The corporate non-jobs will still be comfortably doing their consulting with customers and powerpoint presentations charting how much government cuts have damaged frontline services whilst remaining securely in their jobs.

it is not your f..king business! it is the corporations problem and their money, not yours!

your problem is that UK is 12% in red every year and we have to fix; otherwise we end like Irish or Greek.

as we can not tax people 99% we have to cut the spending. spending in the public sector. it is the councilors responsibility who is going to be fired. not the central government.

so stop crying like a small baby and vote next time for councilors, who can do their job ...

Edited by Damik

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That will at least £4 billion out the public sector trough then. Yup, four billion.

I know one of these 'workers' considering redundancy. I would not employ him to make tea.

Employing these people does not add to the economy. It just lowers unemployment stats and keeps them from loitering around libraries.

Edited by tahoma

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