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Fight Food Inflation

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Any helpful hints how to manage bills.

I shopped yesterday at Sainsburys buying all "Basics" range which I find are very good. For desserts loads of tinned fruit in juice (Not syrup) at 16p for pineapples to 34p for peaches.

I buy their basics Creamed rice and packet custard which I think taste every bit as good as more expensive brands. Rice is 17p a tin and packet custard 9p.

I have to agree that the bargain ranges in the supermarkets do tend to be bloody good for the price. I'm always wondering why far more people don't buy them over the brandes stuff. You might be able to argue that the big brand stuff is marginally better but not by much and in most cases the actual difference is negligable, certainly not three or four times as good which is often what the price difference is.

I can only conclude that it's mostly down to people being snobby about not wanting to be seen the cheaper stuff.

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Some of the value stuff is fine, most of it is actually healthier because less flavour enhancing chemical junk has been added.

Some stuff is terrible though but you have to try it at least once to find out.

I am dubious about cheap chicken though and wont touch own brand sausages or mince.

I think that if you really want to save money and combat food inflation then you want a spare chest freezer and to do some shopping at somewhere like costco.

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I have to agree that the bargain ranges in the supermarkets do tend to be bloody good for the price. I'm always wondering why far more people don't buy them over the brandes stuff. You might be able to argue that the big brand stuff is marginally better but not by much and in most cases the actual difference is negligable, certainly not three or four times as good which is often what the price difference is.

I can only conclude that it's mostly down to people being snobby about not wanting to be seen the cheaper stuff.

The plain labeled food is as good or almost as good as the branded stuff...sometimes it is the same but in a different wrapper.

When you buy branded foods you are paying for the advertising, you are paying for the name, some people think names are worth paying for....I would rather spend my money on the food inside not the label.

To help manage bills....always write a shopping list and eat before going food shopping.....have some idea of the meals you plan to make in the week...save on fuel bills by cooking more than you require and eat the following day or freeze for another day.

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Any helpful hints how to manage bills.

I shopped yesterday at Sainsburys buying all "Basics" range which I find are very good. For desserts loads of tinned fruit in juice (Not syrup) at 16p for pineapples to 34p for peaches.

I buy their basics Creamed rice and packet custard which I think taste every bit as good as more expensive brands. Rice is 17p a tin and packet custard 9p.

Thought just occurred to me.

Imagine:

- People start buying the Value ranges en masse.

- Since many are loss-leaders, stores have no choice but to hike the prices sharpish.

- Inflation indexes are based partially on exactly these loss leaders.

- Headline inflation takes off as a result..

Not sure if this is all true or follows, of course..

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Some of the value stuff is fine, most of it is actually healthier because less flavour enhancing chemical junk has been added.

Some stuff is terrible though but you have to try it at least once to find out.

I am dubious about cheap chicken though and wont touch own brand sausages or mince.

I think that if you really want to save money and combat food inflation then you want a spare chest freezer and to do some shopping at somewhere like costco.

yes i agree with this (esp. the costco bit).

as for the value brands, it depends what it is and what you want to do with it.

for example tinned chopped tomatoes i always go for the napolina now, even the superownbrand is too watery.

but for things like tinned meatballs then value/ownbrand is no problem, you're never going to get high quality meatballs out of a can (you'll need to roll your own for superb meatballs!)

edit: though if you're only using the tomatoes for a fry up then value is fine, if it's to stir into a lasagne then you'll spend more on gas/electric reducing the sauce than the can of toms!

also i never buy the value meat, more to do with the taste and the treatment of the animals than the price that though.

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Imagine:

- People start buying the Value ranges en masse.

They have stopped doing the cheapy jaffa cakes. (Really just like mcviities)

And something else I looked for recently was also gone but can't remember.

Eventually we'll be buying less and less processed stuff and just need a butcher and greengrocers

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I have shopped at tesco and sainsburys and tried a lot of their value stuff which mostly seems fine.

I have only tried asda a couple of times and hate going there, their own brand stuff is by far the worst imo.

I wont do morrisons after we had ham with maggots in it and our aldi is garbage so we dont go there either.

Macro is a rip off and even when buying bulk can be more expensive than teso/sainsbury. Costco is best imo but you still have to have your wits about you with some of the pricing.

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Eventually we'll be buying less and less processed stuff and just need a butcher and greengrocers

+1

Let's face it. The best way to cut your food outgoings it to eat less. And that's becuase most of us eat far more than we need.

BTW, about 80% of 'food' that supermarkets sell shouldn't be called food. Let's face it - it's pure junk.

Things like ketchup or mayonnaise or even sweet yoghurts are in fact junk. Your body doesn't need them.

Instead of eating junk people's health would greatly benefit from a little starvation.

That's what I do and I feel great! B)

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+1

Let's face it. The best way to cut your food outgoings it to eat less. And that's becuase most of us eat far more than we need.

BTW, about 80% of 'food' that supermarkets sell shouldn't be called food. Let's face it - it's pure junk.

Things like ketchup or mayonnaise or even sweet yoghurts are in fact junk. Your body doesn't need them.

Instead of eating junk people's health would greatly benefit from a little starvation.

That's what I do and I feel great! B)

so are you a bean pole, pole?

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+1

Let's face it. The best way to cut your food outgoings it to eat less. And that's becuase most of us eat far more than we need.

BTW, about 80% of 'food' that supermarkets sell shouldn't be called food. Let's face it - it's pure junk.

Things like ketchup or mayonnaise or even sweet yoghurts are in fact junk. Your body doesn't need them.

Instead of eating junk people's health would greatly benefit from a little starvation.

That's what I do and I feel great! B)

ketchup isnt junk and it is good for you.

we do eat too much though although for many of us that changes come the summer.

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Guest eight

Any helpful hints how to manage bills.

16p for pineapples

Those pineapples were 13p just a few weeks ago.

eight

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ketchup isnt junk and it is good for you.

I was going to say the same thing. It does have a fair amount of sugar and salt, but the good stuff is mostly tomatoes. They do a tiptree ketchup which is really rich and delicious, but this would not help you fight food inflation!

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Don't buy junk like crisps, cakes, biscuits, sweets, cereals, small sugary yoghurts etc. You don't need to eat these and are often paying steak prices (>£12/kg) for processed carbohydrates. Cheese is a treat, not a necessity. If you don't have these things in the house, you can't eat them.

In general try to buy basic foodstuffs i.e. things that are made from one species of plant or animal. Always look at the price per kg or ml and try to remember it for next time. Chuck out the ready made sauces and learn to cook them from scratch.

Buy lots of protein, it is better for you than carbs and will fill you up. Beef and pork are cheap while lamb and poultry are expensive. Make sure to adjust the price in your head if you are paying for bones and skin. Buy reduced meat and freeze in useful-size portions. Learn to cook liver (lamb/chicken) and kidneys (lamb, haven't tried pork) if you like them.

Learn to cook the odd vegetarian meal. Mushroom stroganoff is very good, and tofu (buy it in east Asian shops and freeze it) can be a cheap substitute for chicken or pork.

If you are feeling adventurous learn to make your own seitan, probably the cheapest protein money can buy. Once you have made a lump separate it into smaller chunks and simmer it in a broth made from soy sauce and ginger for a couple of hours. Then freeze and use as a meat substitute in lots of recipes.

Value canned tomatoes and kidney beans are indistinguishable from the normal ones. Also value peanuts and sultanas. Cheaper chickpeas can usually be found in the relevant ethnnic section at your local supermarket. Frozen spinach and peas are great.

Edit: >>>>>HUGZ<<<<<<<

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Don't buy junk like crisps, cakes, biscuits, sweets, cereals, small sugary yoghurts etc. You don't need to eat these and are often paying steak prices (>£12/kg) for processed carbohydrates. Cheese is a treat, not a necessity. If you don't have these things in the house, you can't eat them.

Snip>

Value canned tomatoes and kidney beans are indistinguishable from the normal ones. Also value peanuts and sultanas. Cheaper chickpeas can usually be found in the relevant ethnnic section at your local supermarket. Frozen spinach and peas are great.

Edit: HUGZ

Agree with all of that...value peanuts 30p a packet this week......made a nice vegetable bake any root veg you have add cauli, broccoli or cabbage if you have it....par boil veg, layer in large dish with onion salt and black pepper....then make a white sauce, butter, flour and milk...you can add grated cheese if you like and pour over veg...add some grated cheese on top and bake in oven until vegetables cooked through....very tasty and more than your daily five a day. ;)

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Any helpful hints how to manage bills.

I shopped yesterday at Sainsburys buying all "Basics" range which I find are very good. For desserts loads of tinned fruit in juice (Not syrup) at 16p for pineapples to 34p for peaches.

I buy their basics Creamed rice and packet custard which I think taste every bit as good as more expensive brands. Rice is 17p a tin and packet custard 9p.

Careful - I nearly bought some of the cheaper tinned fruit the other day. Until I read the label and found that the country of origin was China. There's been far too many food quality scandals for me to ever trust food of chinese origin.

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I have to agree that the bargain ranges in the supermarkets do tend to be bloody good for the price. I'm always wondering why far more people don't buy them over the brandes stuff. You might be able to argue that the big brand stuff is marginally better but not by much and in most cases the actual difference is negligable, certainly not three or four times as good which is often what the price difference is.

I can only conclude that it's mostly down to people being snobby about not wanting to be seen the cheaper stuff.

I always think that, unless they have a special offer, supermarkets just rip you off on branded stuff.

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We've tried a lot of things in the Sainsburys economy range. Most are fine, a few were awful.

As far as I can see on the carton the skimmed milk is exactly the same as the normal range of skimmed milk.

Other ways to save on food bills:

Plan meals on a weekly basis, make a list of what you need and buy it in one visit to the shops.

Avoid top-up shops.

Keep an eye open for specials offers (2 for 1 or half price offers), if you see something you use stock up on the special offers provided it'll keep OK for several weeks or even months and you won't simply guzzle the lot in a week.

Check out local markets, these are often cheaper for fresh fruit & veg and often for meat and other foods. (Medium eggs £1.40 a dozen last week, supermarket £1.80)

Consider dropping certain items if you feel they no longer give good value. I stopped buying "corner" type yougarts when they went over 50p and now just buy a large tub of plain yougart and add it to fruit as required. Also dropped certain cereals when they went over £2.50 a packet, opt for own brand basic cereals now.

Non-food, find Wilkinsons very good for cleaning products etc. Even the local pound shop is worth a visit but they tend not to have the continuity of products.

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Any helpful hints how to manage bills.

Don't buy fresh vegetables, get frozen in. Much fresher, no peeling and nothing goes off in the fridge and you're not beholden to a plan. Freeze things like chillies after deseeding and chopping them in icecube trays -- one small pack of chilli cubes will go a long way. You can also freeze herbs like dill, lovage and parsley -- I grow those in the garden and never buy them, a few pots of each keep me fully supplied.

Don't buy ham/salami/pastrami and other £20 a kilo goodies. Buy a nice hunk of meat instead, roast/slowcook that and keep it for pickings/sanis/etc, make soup with the stock.

Bulk cook: make a large pot of bolognese or chilli, freeze in portions.

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  • 311 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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