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Surely Its Student Housing And Bed Sits That Have Caused The Problem?

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Almost every large town and city in the UK has seen its inner city areas changed from family owned "town houses" to student /bed sit land.

If there had been purpose built accommodation for such groups instead of converting inner city houses, many of these desirable areas would still be full of families, desirables house would not be in such short supply, inner city rents would not be so high, high streets would still thrive , house price much lower and we would all live happily ever after....? as is the case in the rest of europe.....

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There's been tons of student accomodation built over the last few years... Surprised it's not impacted more on the surrounding areas... BUT such high numbers going to uni have created massive problems.

Problem being students like to stay in areas - Chorlton and Didsbury are very popular with graduates ...

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Conversely you could argue that student accommodation is an efficient use of a house, often cramming many people in to what would normally house 2 people.

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Conversely you could argue that student accommodation is an efficient use of a house, often cramming many people in to what would normally house 2 people.

The degradation of quality of life for non student households though is horrid.

More noise, more people to and from the house, more potential for car parking issues, parties, more crime, more burglaries etc etc

AND they don't even pay council tax!

Edited by SarahBell

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The Victorian and Edwardian suburb of Swansea - The Uplands and Brynmill where Dylan Thomas grew up, lived and about which he wrote mosto f his poetry - have been utterly destroyed by a 'studentification' of the area.

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Student accommodation is the closest thing remaining to how single people used to live in our cities.

Professional chaps like Holmes and Watson would aspire to something better than shared digs nowadays.

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Conversely you could argue that student accommodation is an efficient use of a house, often cramming many people in to what would normally house 2 people.

No I don't think so, for a start most of these houses have gardens, which aren't really used, and take up large land areas.

Most european cities have purpose built apartment blocks for single occupants, and are far denser as a result...

Just sacrificing a small area of victorian, edwardian, georgian terraces for purpose built high density living would free up masses of potentially high quality housing and built environment in most cities...

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Um, as I understand the majority of empty homes are larger properties, small houses are more in demand than bigger ones. You just have to look at the prices, the difference between price a flat and a house has shrunk, and the cost to rent a big house isn't much above the price to rent a small house. The biggest area of demand is smaller properties, whereas larger properties stand empty even though you get much relativly more for your money. Smaller cheaper property is in demand from everyone which drives up the price, where bigger property stagnates. There is very little demand for larger town houses, you cant rent them, you cant sell them.... all you can do is split them into flats or bedsits as that is where the demand is.

Edited by AteMoose

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Where did 18-22 year olds live in the 1970s and 80s before university entrance became so widespread? I suspect in similar shared digs, but maybe concentrated in town centres where the jobs were rather than the suburbs where many universities are located.

As others have said, student houses and the young professional HMOs that come after them are an extremely efficient way to pack a lot of people into not much space.

If you want to blame an age group for the supposed lack of housing, try 50+ couples or singles occupying 3 and 4 bed homes. There are a lot more of them now because people are living longer.

Edited by Dorkins

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Where did 18-22 year olds live in the 1970s and 80s before university entrance became so widespread?

It's a sheer numbers game I think...

Was maybe 3% of the age group went to uni...

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It's a sheer numbers game I think...

Was maybe 3% of the age group went to uni...

Yes, but presumably the other 97% had to live somewhere.

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Subtract the international (foreign) students from the total to find out how much student housing has grown by - In my experience, the Chinese and Indians of all people are so appalled by the quality of housing in this country that theyre the ones who fill the dedicated unite type accomodation blocks. I spent my last year in one back in 2006 and i must have been about one of 30 (out of 900 or so) white British living in the blocks. Some may have been Indian British, but id guess most were indian and chinese nationals.

We dont realise just how shabby housing is in this country. But for the clean running water its basically third world. Middle class indians and chinese look down on us.

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Where did 18-22 year olds live in the 1970s and 80s before university entrance became so widespread? I suspect in similar shared digs, but maybe concentrated in town centres where the jobs were rather than the suburbs where many universities are located.

As others have said, student houses and the young professional HMOs that come after them are an extremely efficient way to pack a lot of people into not much space.

If you want to blame an age group for the supposed lack of housing, try 50+ couples or singles occupying 3 and 4 bed homes. There are a lot more of them now because people are living longer.

Either they lived at home, or in shared flats/houses, often exceedingly grotty ones by today's standards. But if you were from a certain era, anything was better than living at home, since unlike today, your folks were so often on a completely different planet.

As for PB student housing, isn't one of the problems with it that it's often a lot more expensive than the traditional grotty shared house? There's a new PB block not a million miles from me, described as 'luxury' student accom, despite it being on a very busy main road with double decker buses trundling past literally every 10 seconds. I gather it's furnished ensuite bedsits with wifi etc.

I get the impression a lot of this sort of accomm. is aimed at wealthier foreign students.

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I gather it's furnished ensuite bedsits with wifi etc.

I get the impression a lot of this sort of accomm. is aimed at wealthier foreign students.

FWIW, I stayed a few days at my old college last year, in a student room. It's now ensuite! But I'd much rather it wasn't: it's not a good use of valuable space, and (worse) it was bloomin' noisy with the fan. Far better the old-fashioned communal bathrooms (which in my day were even completely unisex - no discrimination).

Being outside term-time, the college accommodation was indeed predominantly populated by japanese students.

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The aggregate impact of student housing is minimal on a national scale, although it concentrates in areas where it can become very noticeable.

Frankly, 5 years out of uni and many of my peers are still living in student-like shared accommodation, although a bit neater. It's the norm for many young professionals. Rents are just too high to get your own place unless you are a couple (or I suppose on LHA).

Many of them are lawyers, engineers etc so doing alright for themselves, a few are buying now (all with parental help) and a few more starting to get their own rentals, usually as couples.

But across swathes of London most of the houses are divided up into flats that are no different, with several families living in a property that would have housed one (though admittedly a bigger one most likely)

The phenomenon of crammed housing units (including the obligatory horrid kitchen built against sitting-room wall setup) built from formerly wonderful homes is pretty ubiquitous in the theoretically-prosperous urban south.

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The aggregate impact of student housing is minimal on a national scale, although it concentrates in areas where it can become very noticeable.

Frankly, 5 years out of uni and many of my peers are still living in student-like shared accommodation, although a bit neater. It's the norm for many young professionals. Rents are just too high to get your own place unless you are a couple (or I suppose on LHA).

Many of them are lawyers, engineers etc so doing alright for themselves, a few are buying now (all with parental help) and a few more starting to get their own rentals, usually as couples.

But across swathes of London most of the houses are divided up into flats that are no different, with several families living in a property that would have housed one (though admittedly a bigger one most likely)

The phenomenon of crammed housing units (including the obligatory horrid kitchen built against sitting-room wall setup) built from formerly wonderful homes is pretty ubiquitous in the theoretically-prosperous urban south.

Not at all a new thing, though. In the 50s and 60s there were masses of more or less grotty bedsits in London and the SE (in houses that had formerly been good-sized Victorian/Edwardian family homes) often with one equally grotty bathroom shared by several. And often very basic cooking facilities on top. Just one gas ring wasn't unusual. I think someone even wrote a 50s/60s cookery book based on cooking on one gas ring.

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Am sure it's not a new thing. Actually it's remarkable given so many people live this way that it's never really been given weight as a social demographic. I've often thought that the people in these cramped, slightly dingy but just about acceptable conditions are the people who most suffer from the nimby attitude and predatory landlords, but they never seem to get a collective voice.

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Even if I got a £50k job tomorrow, which is very unlikely, I would rent a cheap studio\bedsit in the short term. The current real estate market is a complete joke.

Edited by HPC001

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"Surely Its Student Housing And Bed Sits That Have Caused The Problem?"

Sir, your rhetoric is quite ridiculous. I would not be so sure that students are the cause of the problem and would be tempted to look elsewhere i.e. immigration, bank lending, media, the intrinsic level of greed in the overall general population.. for example!! Like I said, ridiculous statement!

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"Surely Its Student Housing And Bed Sits That Have Caused The Problem?"

Sir, your rhetoric is quite ridiculous. I would not be so sure that students are the cause of the problem and would be tempted to look elsewhere i.e. immigration, bank lending, media, the intrinsic level of greed in the overall general population.. for example!! Like I said, ridiculous statement!

Where have i said students are the cause of the problem?

I'm talking about housing in central city housing areas being divided into multiple flats and causing shortage of inner city housing, which is all related to bank lending etc...

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FWIW, I stayed a few days at my old college last year, in a student room. It's now ensuite! But I'd much rather it wasn't: it's not a good use of valuable space, and (worse) it was bloomin' noisy with the fan. Far better the old-fashioned communal bathrooms (which in my day were even completely unisex - no discrimination).

Being outside term-time, the college accommodation was indeed predominantly populated by japanese students.

I wonder how many uni halls still have non-ensuite rooms? Let alone shared rooms, which were pretty normal once. Not that I'm saying sharing is a good thing - one wants to finish an essay, one wants to sleep, etc. My US niece recently started at Berkeley (Calif.) and shares a 'dorm' room with 2 other girls. Unheard of here now I should think - and still not exactly cheap.

In my student day (60s) hall was out of the q for the likes of moi - just too expensive. It was 'lodgings' with the good old student landlady in your first year (when you weren't to be trusted without supervision ;) ) and the cheapest old grotty flat/bedsit you could find afterwards. My LL spoiled me rotten, though - all sorts of goodies I didn't get at home. Put on over a stone in my first term - mind you I was only about 7 1/2 stone to start with - when I got home at Christmas my mother was convinced I was pregnant. :P

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I wonder how many uni halls still have non-ensuite rooms? Let alone shared rooms, which were pretty normal once. Not that I'm saying sharing is a good thing - one wants to finish an essay, one wants to sleep, etc. My US niece recently started at Berkeley (Calif.) and shares a 'dorm' room with 2 other girls. Unheard of here now I should think - and still not exactly cheap.

In my student day (60s) hall was out of the q for the likes of moi - just too expensive. It was 'lodgings' with the good old student landlady in your first year (when you weren't to be trusted without supervision ;) ) and the cheapest old grotty flat/bedsit you could find afterwards. My LL spoiled me rotten, though - all sorts of goodies I didn't get at home. Put on over a stone in my first term - mind you I was only about 7 1/2 stone to start with - when I got home at Christmas my mother was convinced I was pregnant. :P

What a great idea....to rent a room in a private house with a resident landlady, peace and quiet have a nice room to study without other noise and distractions, and also saves lots of money.......no wild parties there then, I am sure if you look they will not be far away, if that one of the reasons for going to university? ;)

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What a great idea....to rent a room in a private house with a resident landlady, peace and quiet have a nice room to study without other noise and distractions, and also saves lots of money.......no wild parties there then, I am sure if you look they will not be far away, if that one of the reasons for going to university? ;)

Hmm. Never studied in the room - too small and bloody freezing in winter, no cent. heating then - and the only loo was outside the back door. :( Would never have had p&q for working either - she was constantly calling up the stairs, 'Like a cup of tea, love? I've just mashed.' Main reason she let the room was for company. She was lovely, though, bless her, and some of her neighbours were characters. Still remember gems from one or two, e.g. 'I'd never get married again, love - I never did take to the upstairs work.' :P

It'd be different now, of course, certainly re heating and loos. Elderly neighbour lets a room to students from uni down the road. Usually foreign ones.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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