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Professional Food Processor - Is It Worth It If You Use It A Lot?

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Hi All,

any keen amateur cooks here, or professional cooks -

I have just killed a kenwood mid-range 500w food processor after 3 years, me and my missus enjoy cooking at home a lot and it has seen heavy use

Some of the coils on the motor have burned out when processing a particularly thick soup, still runs but on lower speed/power so will get replaced at some point when funds allow

My question is this: am I better off simply buying a replacement every so often when I knacker one, at £50-£60 (if I shop around) every 3-5 yrs (I guess) and just accept it? Brand new kenwood replacement motor costs £40 so arguably not worth the repair even if i do it myself, which I may do, does that seem worth it?

or are there professional ones out there that will last much longer? (prices seem sufficiently high for professional ones, £100+, to not seem worth it??)

cheers all

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I would have thought buying one for £50 every so often would be more sensible as you would, presumably, get the benefits of more up to date features and also some kind of 12 month guarantee.

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What were you really trying to shred?

he Kenwood HB713 Triblade hand blender. Product features include:

* Powerful 700W motor

About 30 quid.

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Hi All,

any keen amateur cooks here, or professional cooks -

I have just killed a kenwood mid-range 500w food processor after 3 years, me and my missus enjoy cooking at home a lot and it has seen heavy use

Some of the coils on the motor have burned out when processing a particularly thick soup, still runs but on lower speed/power so will get replaced at some point when funds allow

My question is this: am I better off simply buying a replacement every so often when I knacker one, at £50-£60 (if I shop around) every 3-5 yrs (I guess) and just accept it? Brand new kenwood replacement motor costs £40 so arguably not worth the repair even if i do it myself, which I may do, does that seem worth it?

or are there professional ones out there that will last much longer? (prices seem sufficiently high for professional ones, £100+, to not seem worth it??)

cheers all

Check out the German Thermomix range. These are seriously good and are reported to last forever. They cost are fair whack but if you like cooking and don't want to mess around with inferior products that frequently bust, this is your daddy. Can buy second hand ones on ebay if you're interested.

http://www.foodepedia.co.uk/food/2009/mar/thermomix.htm

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What were you really trying to shred?

he Kenwood HB713 Triblade hand blender. Product features include:

* Powerful 700W motor

About 30 quid.

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I've got a magimix and I've used it about 5 times in as many years. I find a sharp knife less hassle.

Doing smooth soup through a sieve is not as easy as using a wand style blender.

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Doing smooth soup through a sieve is not as easy as using a wand style blender.

about 3.5 litres of thick roast parsnip soup - lovely stuff, a bit like cement tho!

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Doing smooth soup through a sieve is not as easy as using a wand style blender.

different purposes - sometimes you want to leave some stuff behind (skins, bones) which a sieve does but a blender does not, a 'food mill' is really handy for sieving with much less hassle, makes fantastic savioury tomato sauces that blending cannot match

excuse my geekiness!

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about 3.5 litres of thick roast parsnip soup - lovely stuff, a bit like cement tho!

Mmmmm. Sounds good to me :)

I've been really into leek and potato soup recently.... it's just so easy and effort free for such a nice soup.

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different purposes - sometimes you want to leave some stuff behind (skins, bones) which a sieve does but a blender does not, a 'food mill' is really handy for sieving with much less hassle, makes fantastic savioury tomato sauces that blending cannot match

excuse my geekiness!

If you ever watch qvc/the other shopping channel - they sell some amazing blender that ends up heating stuff up -

they're dear blenders but look fab..

Whole chicken carcass makes pink chicken stock... Not sure I want to eat that as it looks particularly pink.

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If you ever watch qvc/the other shopping channel - they sell some amazing blender that ends up heating stuff up -

they're dear blenders but look fab..

Whole chicken carcass makes pink chicken stock... Not sure I want to eat that as it looks particularly pink.

you can't beat sheer Wattage

the more powerful the motor the less hard it has to work and the longer it will last

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about 3.5 litres of thick roast parsnip soup - lovely stuff, a bit like cement tho!

Rather you than me -- have you considered a cement mixer instead? :):):)

Jokes aside, buying a FP is a calculation of 'how many gadgets does it need' and what you want to process.

I'd say that an el cheapo model is sufficient, because most things that break the cheap appliances will also kill the expensive ones, some stuff just needs doing by hand.

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Bought the smallest magimix food processor (3200) for £120 in the sales last year. Viewed it as an investment, should last for years.

It gets used at least once a week by my wife along with a braun stick blender (600W) for soups and chopper attachment for small amounts of herbs and things like hoummus and taramasalata. The only criticism of the magimix is sometimes a bigger one would be nice but they're a lot more expensive, take up more room and you can get around it by doing another batch or whatever it is you're doing.

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Rather you than me -- have you considered a cement mixer instead? :):):)

Kenwood Chef then!

My mum's one is still stirring stodgy cake mix after 40 years! :huh:

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250px-Handheld_Electric_Beater.jpg

Bamix-Deluxe-391200-2-Speed-Blender.jpg

These are the blenders I use easy to use and easy to clean, everything else is done by hand....nothing more is needed. ;)

Generally I'm as tight as the proverbial... except when it comes to kitchen appliances.

KitchenAid-5KSM150PSEPM.jpg

Magimix-4200-Food-Processor.jpg

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Generally I'm as tight as the proverbial... except when it comes to kitchen appliances.

Nothing to do with the cost, it has all do do with ease of use, convenience and less washing up...also big appliances that contain a bowl require space....it is an eyesore, gathers dust and wastes counter working space also then takes up valuable space inside cupboards.....the less attachments the better...simple is best......less is more. ;)

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My wife and I are both very keen cooks: and have been for many years.

All my bread and pastry are made by hand. (We make all our bread and even pizzas; mainly because we can then selected best flours).

We have a Moulinex Processor: now probably 18 years old still going strong. Not used very much though. The small liquidiser on this is fine.

We also have a big and powerful (glass container) liquidiser, bought would you believe from Lidl and cost on sale less than £20!

We also have a hand-held mixer; an electric mincer - Moulinex - (Which I only really use for mincing lamb when making Sheek Kebabs); bought secondhand from a junk shop for circa £5: bought new blades for about £4. Works fine.

Have a Moulinex handheld stick blender which is great for sauces etc.

Probably the best amateur-level Processor is an old Kenwood: they are really in vogue now!

Often things like this are bought in a flush of new enthusiasm: used a few times and forgotten about; thus often, not even worn.

Bit like exercise bikes and running machines around New Year! :D

A number of people specialise in reconditioning them and repairing too.

e.g.

See Here:

Look on eBay: example:

The new Chefs are no longer made by Kenwood but (From memory?) De Longhi in Italy and it's a typical example of badge engineering.

Pile of junk but uses the same trusted name.

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Rather you than me -- have you considered a cement mixer instead? :):):)

Jokes aside, buying a FP is a calculation of 'how many gadgets does it need' and what you want to process.

I'd say that an el cheapo model is sufficient, because most things that break the cheap appliances will also kill the expensive ones, some stuff just needs doing by hand.

the cheap motors in cheap recent kenwoods burn out under heavy load if left on for more than a minute - I have read multiple reviews that say they do this or sommat like it, and it happened to me. Statistically under a moderate amount of use you will trash the motor unit in a cheap one every so-many years if you're keen; reviews also suggest the expensive makes of blender do not do this, they use higher spec motors, at a price. As I said, from the reviews.

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the cheap motors in cheap recent kenwoods burn out under heavy load if left on for more than a minute

You can try to turn it off after 40 seconds or pulse it, then give the machine a break to cool down. Or process the tougher bits in the small blender part (for the nuts) or split the workload up.

Either way, if you're planning to have the machine knead sourdough, buy an industrial model, because sourdough will kill even expensive FPs.

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You can try to turn it off after 40 seconds or pulse it, then give the machine a break to cool down. Or process the tougher bits in the small blender part (for the nuts) or split the workload up.

Either way, if you're planning to have the machine knead sourdough, buy an industrial model, because sourdough will kill even expensive FPs.

fair enough, thanks

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The new Chefs are no longer made by Kenwood but (From memory?) De Longhi in Italy and it's a typical example of badge engineering.

Pile of junk but uses the same trusted name.

The Kenwood Chef MAJOR is pretty damn good, but I agree the basic Chef with its tiny motor is a useless toy

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Nothing to do with the cost, it has all do do with ease of use, convenience and less washing up...also big appliances that contain a bowl require space....it is an eyesore, gathers dust and wastes counter working space also then takes up valuable space inside cupboards.....the less attachments the better...simple is best......less is more. ;)

Hence why I bought a Kitchenaid rather than a Kenwood. Call me sad, but I never tire of looking at it.

I'm lucky, I have enough worktop to put them on. I wouldn't put either of them in a cupboard, I'd put my back out keep lifting them in and out, they both weigh a tonne!

Most of the bits can go in the dishwasher, and they enable me to do large quantities easily. 'Pomme Dauph' is a favourite in our house, a quick dish to prep with my kit, and a damn tedious one with yours.

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  • 285 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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