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Only 3% Of New Jobs Are Permanent

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Apologies for posting the Daily Fail, but here goes

--

Desperate job hunters are increasingly being told: It’s part-time or nothing.

An astonishing 97 per cent of posts created since the economy came out of recession are of limited hours.

This means only 6,000 of the 200,000 jobs to have come up in a year pay a full-time wage.

The worrying findings, by a respected think tank, raise the spectre of a sluggish recovery with legions of workers having to accept a so-called ‘McJob’ to make ends meet.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1352333/Part-time-work-Of-200k-jobs-created-year-3-time.html#ixzz1Cf548SAs

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Apologies for posting the Daily Fail, but here goes

--

Desperate job hunters are increasingly being told: It’s part-time or nothing.

An astonishing 97 per cent of posts created since the economy came out of recession are of limited hours.

This means only 6,000 of the 200,000 jobs to have come up in a year pay a full-time wage.

The worrying findings, by a respected think tank, raise the spectre of a sluggish recovery with legions of workers having to accept a so-called ‘McJob’ to make ends meet.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1352333/Part-time-work-Of-200k-jobs-created-year-3-time.html#ixzz1Cf548SAs

The Government is confident that jobs displaced from the Public Sector will be created in the private sector. But the private sector is unable to get funding from the Banks to invest in order to create jobs. The quality of the jobs in terms of remuneration and employment protection, pension rights etc will be lower.

Part time working where people have a portfolio of jobs I think is going to be more of a reality, it does have the slight advantage of diversifying the risks of being dependant on one source of income.

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Expect the unexpected.

Genuinely surprised. Staggering figures, that signal to the total breakdown of any accepted historical norms. You can throw all the old historical HPI/earnings ratios in the bin with jobs like these. Mortgages (especially at anything like current house prices) are totally untenable.

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...wonder how many full time jobs are lost due to the removal of the age 65 ceiling retirement ...?..this was a sick move by people who do not understand ....we only see small minds with faltered judgment from these over educated morons..... :rolleyes:

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That's absolutely crazy if only partially true - the multinational corporations and Westminster may be facing an Tunisian/Egyptian style flare up in the UK sooner than we'll think. <_<

Edited by Big Orange

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That's absolutely crazy if only partially true - the multinational corporations and Westminster seem to be facing an Tunisian/Egyptian style flare up in the UK sooner than we'll think. <_<

....that's not a solution....that's just a quicker route to the bottom in our case ... :rolleyes:

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British managers definately don't follow the Edwards Deming principles of management. One of them is to not do temporary contracts and create an environment of fear and short termism.

If someone is on a 6 month contract and probably will be working elsewhere in 7 months.. is that person going to work towards the long term improvement and advancement of the company? Are they going to be relaxed and confident in their position and willing to take risks?

Its these classic mistakes.. the victorian factory owner mentality that caused Britain to lose almost all our manufacturing companies. This kind of looter mentality works well when you are only competing against others doing the same.. but when you face an opponent like German industry where they are co-operating together and the workers feel part of the team and proud of the products, the old victorian era management style gets smashed.

The victorian era factory owner asks how can I save £1 pound an hour across 2,000 workers.. now we're talking some real money. But in the moden era of robots and engineering quality, this same mentality is dangerously out of date.

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Wonder what the mortgage ability is for someone on a six month part time contract earning £6 an hour ? Answer Zero .

How much more are the taxpayers going to be funding these jobs via in work benefits ?

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British managers definately don't follow the Edwards Deming principles of management. One of them is to not do temporary contracts and create an environment of fear and short termism.

If someone is on a 6 month contract and probably will be working elsewhere in 7 months.. is that person going to work towards the long term improvement and advancement of the company? Are they going to be relaxed and confident in their position and willing to take risks?

Its these classic mistakes.. the victorian factory owner mentality that caused Britain to lose almost all our manufacturing companies. This kind of looter mentality works well when you are only competing against others doing the same.. but when you face an opponent like German industry where they are co-operating together and the workers feel part of the team and proud of the products, the old victorian era management style gets smashed.

The victorian era factory owner asks how can I save £1 pound an hour across 2,000 workers.. now we're talking some real money. But in the moden era of robots and engineering quality, this same mentality is dangerously out of date.

...agreed ...Deming did not agree with Business School methods ...but he did teach Sony, Nissan and other Japanese greats how to develop quality after WW2....and become leading players in World production.....even the US his own country did not take him as seriously as the Japanese ...... :rolleyes:

Edited by South Lorne

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I agree with a33, the Anglo-American Victorian manager mindset was not as obviously detrimental and self-destructive as its proven to be in recent decades, when the US and UK had less immediate and overwhelming industrial competition before the late 1960s, although Britain started on its slow decline as a first rate manufacturer as early as 1900.

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I agree with a33, the Anglo-American Victorian manager mindset was not as obviously detrimental and self-destructive as its proven to be in recent decades, when the US and UK had less immediate and overwhelming industrial competition before the late 1960s, although Britain started on its slow decline as a first rate manufacturer as early as 1900.

....agreed ..it's all about poor management....take Nissan UK ...under Japanese management methods the British workers produce quality as good as the Japanese production lines and other areas in the world.....how many UK management teams from other companies in the UK go along to see how this is achieved ...not many I suspect.....and probably would find it hard to 'get it'...... :rolleyes:

Edited by South Lorne

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....agreed ..it's all about poor management....take Nissan UK ...under Japanese management methods the British workers produce quality as good as the Japanese production lines and other areas in the world.....how many UK management teams from other companies in the UK go along to see how this is achieved ...not many I suspect.....and probably would find it hard to 'get it'...... :rolleyes:

Great point. Its interesting how well thought of British workers are by foreign owned companies.

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Totally agree, besides an initial 6month contract or internship to get a better feel for someone over and above a job interview, having them in for the long term as part of the family so to speak is best for all. I know if I was an employee I'd want something where I can expand in a role and grow with the company. Likewise from a company recruitment perspective I think its better to recruit from within becuase its better the devil you know and the transition is smoother provided theres the training and support to go with the transition. Its less effective for a company to recruit from the outside when you consider the time taken getting up to speed or familiar with the new company and this includes contracting in business consultants to optimise the company.

Its all about building a strong team which in turn generates loyalty and good will. Random rewards are also very effective, which could be anything from a gift voucher, to a meal for two or even weekend away. It helps break the monotony of home life whilst making coming to work more pleasurable.

Agree with all your points, random reward are effective and relatively cheap in making employees happy. I like your analogy to a family, thats what it is.

The most successful manufacturer is probably Germany and they have the mentality right. Like I heard if you are in the state BMW is in and throw insults at BMW cars, you could well be beaten on the spot by an angry local who heard you. That is pride and loyalty to the company. And of course the company has to return and build that by bringing up its workers as it advances.

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British managers definately don't follow the Edwards Deming principles of management. One of them is to not do temporary contracts and create an environment of fear and short termism.

If someone is on a 6 month contract and probably will be working elsewhere in 7 months.. is that person going to work towards the long term improvement and advancement of the company? Are they going to be relaxed and confident in their position and willing to take risks?

Its these classic mistakes.. the victorian factory owner mentality that caused Britain to lose almost all our manufacturing companies. This kind of looter mentality works well when you are only competing against others doing the same.. but when you face an opponent like German industry where they are co-operating together and the workers feel part of the team and proud of the products, the old victorian era management style gets smashed.

The victorian era factory owner asks how can I save £1 pound an hour across 2,000 workers.. now we're talking some real money. But in the moden era of robots and engineering quality, this same mentality is dangerously out of date.

The trouble is everything has its price. It may be a good think to promote loyalty and the accumulation of skills through experience, but at what cost? UK workers are far more expensive than workers in other countries. The logic and maths of global wage arbitrage therefore demand that companies create jobs in other countries where those jobs can be exported. This leaves the UK to create service jobs financed by printed money, mostly to support the higher paying jobs in the public sector.

This process cannot go on forever. The borrowing needed to keep public sector workers and those on benefits, particularly but not exclusively pensions, at current levels is not sustainable. At some point the state will exhaust its ability to borrow, and like Greece and Ireland our debt markets will close. We will have to balance the budget, and do so on the back of what tax we can raise in part time service sector jobs and what industry remains.

Someone talked of Tunisian and Egyptian style outrage. That is indeed a fate that awaits us along some of our future paths.

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Cameron talks about wanting to get the UK manufacturing things again but what has he done to actually achieve that goal?

Last week he was saying he wanted mroe free trade.

The man is totally confused , the coalition will go down as being just as bad as labour was in my opinion.

Fiddling while Rome burns.

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....agreed ..it's all about poor management....take Nissan UK ...under Japanese management methods the British workers produce quality as good as the Japanese production lines and other areas in the world.....how many UK management teams from other companies in the UK go along to see how this is achieved ...not many I suspect.....and probably would find it hard to 'get it'...... :rolleyes:

Hmm, I wonder. Is it the workers or is it the structure they operate within? I think it's the latter and that, in my view is where the trick is. You can have first class workers but if you don't have a "good" structure you won't succeed.

If I were Bill Gates my problem in growing the business is not to find a lot of people like myself, because I couldn't; those that are as smart as me wouldn't want to work for me; they want to be me. No, the trick is to build a structure where people of ordinary ability can operate together as a team and produce results.

I can't see any special reason why that structure has to be largely full time people unless it happens to be necessary for that particular industry.

Of course this point of view devalues the individual but that's what I see around me.

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The Government is confident that jobs displaced from the Public Sector will be created in the private sector. But the private sector is unable to get funding from the Banks to invest in order to create jobs. The quality of the jobs in terms of remuneration and employment protection, pension rights etc will be lower.

Part time working where people have a portfolio of jobs I think is going to be more of a reality, it does have the slight advantage of diversifying the risks of being dependant on one source of income.

Ok in theory but not very easy in practice, trying to find two or three part time jobs without worktime/hours cross overs. Maybe we should all just work less. No point one person working over 60 hours a week whilst millions work none.

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The trouble is everything has its price. It may be a good think to promote loyalty and the accumulation of skills through experience, but at what cost? UK workers are far more expensive than workers in other countries. The logic and maths of global wage arbitrage therefore demand that companies create jobs in other countries where those jobs can be exported. This leaves the UK to create service jobs financed by printed money, mostly to support the higher paying jobs in the public sector.

The same could be said of Germany, Japan, South Korea, France and others yet they are investing in new and more capital in those nations.

This process cannot go on forever. The borrowing needed to keep public sector workers and those on benefits, particularly but not exclusively pensions, at current levels is not sustainable. At some point the state will exhaust its ability to borrow, and like Greece and Ireland our debt markets will close. We will have to balance the budget, and do so on the back of what tax we can raise in part time service sector jobs and what industry remains.

Someone talked of Tunisian and Egyptian style outrage. That is indeed a fate that awaits us along some of our future paths.

I agree at some point if we have millions of men out of work, and that hope and belief which is so strong in our people that things will turn around for them.. when that hope is broken, and the young adults feel it truly is impossible for most of them to ever afford a home and most importantly for men to fulfill their biological drive to have and support a family.. then they will eventually organize and overthrow the current ruling elite.

In the middle east we saw how these revolutions came out of nowhere, one day life was as normal, a few days later the president and upper elites have flown out of the country.

I personally do not believe our elites will pay any attention to what has happened elsewhere. I think the concentration of wealth among high ups in corporations and governmetn will continue, unemployment will grow, cracks will be papered over, until one day 100,000 people go into the center of London and refuse to go home until things change.

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I agree with the posters who say that quality of workers is poorer if on short term and part time contracts. I am proof of this - our village shop asked me to help them out with ad hoc shifts last year so I did, working about 10-15 hrs per week on a casual basis.

I wanted to work longer but instead they hired other casual part timers.

The result was that so few shifts and so few hrs (in a 7 day per week village store, deli and coffee shop) meant that I was not learning prices, till operation, how to make/serve myriad hot and cold drinks etc properly - plus would forget stuff between shifts.

Consequently we were all offering sub par service, slow, permananently learning. Also, we would not see customers enough to remember names etc - so all in all we were all slow, unsteady and offering a nervy less friendly service. So business was lost, and money. I gave up in the end, I only wanted some pin money 50 yds from my home for fun, but it became a drag.

Now, finally, the owners are advertising for a full time worker, presumably having realised the problems.

So next time you meet a "thicko" in B&Q, macdonalds etc who appears to be struggling, have a heart and remember that they are just not in work enough to learn their jobs!

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I agree with the posters who say that quality of workers is poorer if on short term and part time contracts. I am proof of this - our village shop asked me to help them out with ad hoc shifts last year so I did, working about 10-15 hrs per week on a casual basis.

I wanted to work longer but instead they hired other casual part timers.

The result was that so few shifts and so few hrs (in a 7 day per week village store, deli and coffee shop) meant that I was not learning prices, till operation, how to make/serve myriad hot and cold drinks etc properly - plus would forget stuff between shifts.

Consequently we were all offering sub par service, slow, permananently learning. Also, we would not see customers enough to remember names etc - so all in all we were all slow, unsteady and offering a nervy less friendly service. So business was lost, and money. I gave up in the end, I only wanted some pin money 50 yds from my home for fun, but it became a drag.

Now, finally, the owners are advertising for a full time worker, presumably having realised the problems.

So next time you meet a "thicko" in B&Q, macdonalds etc who appears to be struggling, have a heart and remember that they are just not in work enough to learn their jobs!

I can assure you I have every sympathy with these people. They are putting the effort in and doing their best for very little reward. I admire them, and feel that the entire system needs to be changed to put these people first, instead of last.

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I think the theory about promoting loyalty and long term workers makes sense. However as we can see many businesses are moving away from this. They prefer flexibility to get rid of people as and when they wish.

Now why don't we just reverse this and get back to having 'loyal' workers and better conditions ?

Sounds good in principle but I think there is a fly in the ointment. Many individuals do not WANT to be loyal long term workers anymore. The 'Job for life' used to be seen as a great reward in past years. These days I think most people (Especially the younger generation) see this is as a nightmare. They would hate to be working in the same place for 30 years.

Not sure if this is a good or bad thing personally. I see the thought of working somewhere for 30 years as horrendous. Others may not. However the thoughts of the masses have definitely changed over time. To my parents generation the thought of a 'job for life' was brilliant. To my generation and those younger than me - for many it is quite the opposite.

It will be very hard for companies to go back to the mantra of loyalty and the rest of it - when many of their employess are just not interested in that anymore.

Interesting to see how it all pans out though. I think fleixibility and people pinging all over the place is the way of the future. Whether that is a good or bad thing - I have yet to decide.

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I think the theory about promoting loyalty and long term workers makes sense. However as we can see many businesses are moving away from this. They prefer flexibility to get rid of people as and when they wish.

Oh STFU, you Neo-Liberal tool. This sort of corrosive mindset and the desire for cheaper wages and more disposable workers is likely why many immigrants are more likely to take these crappy jobs and why Anglo-American corporations did the quite stupid thing of off loading jobs to Asia in the last few decades.

Once the native born workforce gets heavily fragmented/destroyed, and the consumer economies in the UK and the US grind to a halt (which they're doing now), the services and products provided by the job destroying megacorps is kinda rendered pointless.

Edited by Big Orange

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Maybe we should all just work less. No point one person working over 60 hours a week whilst millions work none.

Not to mention taxing the hell out of those working to pay for those sat on their arses all day (at both ends of the spectrum). We're currently learning that doesn't work!

Edited by Fishbone Glover

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I'm sure Dave and Osborne have a plan..................

Well, for their own bankster board jobs in 5 years if nothing else.

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Oh STFU, you Neo-Liberal tool. This sort of corrosive mindset and the desire for cheaper wages and more disposable workers is likely why many immigrants are more likely to take these crappy jobs and why Anglo-American corporations did the quite stupid thing of off loading jobs to Asia in the last few decades.

Once the native born workforce gets heavily fragmented/destroyed, and the consumer economies in the UK and the US grind to a halt (which they're doing now), the services and products provided by the job destroying megacorps is kinda rendered pointless.

Calm - read what I said. I was just stating what is happening. And it is - there is no doubt of that. Whether it is 'right ' or 'wrong' is another question. And if you read what I said you will notice I said I do not know yet. I can see the benefits of both situations. Most probably the future will consist of a bit of both.

I will go and do a google of 'neo liberalism' to see if I do indeed fit into that little box. :D

rahter rude methinks

there was more sense in his post than yours.

I hate when some arrogant student type starts using labels like Neo Liberal in an effort to sound like they know what they're talking about.

Cheers. I was just making an observation !!

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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