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CasualBear

Damp Caused By New Windows

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The LL has put nice new double glazing in. Great, except that the walls now get a lot of condensation on them. This has caused large mould patches behind any piece of furniture against an exterior wall/corners.

I have spoken to the management company, and their attitude is very much that this is a ventilation problem. They are blaming cooking, showering, breathing and say that we just need to keep it ventilated. So presumably, they want me to keep the windows open in January when it is zero degrees outside.

Any advice? I think they need to be sorting this out. I can't be bothered to deal with all the mould, so I'm tempted just to move. Is there a real solution to these problems?

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The problem is not the windows, its you.

Presumably the old windows used to regularly drip with water/condensation, so as the water cant go there anymore it finds the next coldest spot - the walls.

All new windows should have trickle vents, just cracking those open should help.

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OK, so what do they do in places where it's properly cold? Continually vent cold air in?

Of course they do. As the trapped air in the house warms up it has the ability to hold more and more water vapour (simple chemistry). When the air cools down at a cold surface it can hold much less water vapour and it condenses. Bringing a small amount of fresh cooler (low water vapour) air in allows much of the water vapour to escape. A raging draught is not what required.

You need to address some of the ways you live.

Do not leave washing to dry on radiators, open the bathroom window for 10 minutes after a shower or bath, put the extractor fan on in the kitchen and open windows a bit at the steamiest times. Its all simple stuff.

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The LL has put nice new double glazing in. Great, except that the walls now get a lot of condensation on them. This has caused large mould patches behind any piece of furniture against an exterior wall/corners.

I have spoken to the management company, and their attitude is very much that this is a ventilation problem. They are blaming cooking, showering, breathing and say that we just need to keep it ventilated. So presumably, they want me to keep the windows open in January when it is zero degrees outside.

Any advice? I think they need to be sorting this out. I can't be bothered to deal with all the mould, so I'm tempted just to move. Is there a real solution to these problems?

Getting mould patches behind furniture is bad, in all my days of mouldy rentals I've never seen that happen. To reduce the problem you should be opening the windows in each room for about 15-20 minutes a day anyway. When you've had a shower/bath air the bathroom, i.e. keep the window partly open for an hour or so.

To get rid existing mould, pop to B&Q and buy their mould spray for £5 and will last a very long time. You could also ask the LL for a dehumidifier.

Given how bad you're saying the rental sounds in terms of damp I'd move out.

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You need to address some of the ways you live.

Do not leave washing to dry on radiators, open the bathroom window for 10 minutes after a shower or bath, put the extractor fan on in the kitchen and open windows a bit at the steamiest times. Its all simple stuff.

OK, thanks for the advice. One question though: how the hell am I supposed to dry washing? It's dark wet and cold outside.

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OK, thanks for the advice. One question though: how the hell am I supposed to dry washing? It's dark wet and cold outside.

The LL will not want to see his house ruined with black mould. Have a word with him and ask him to supply and fit either a tumble drier or, as said before, a dehumidifier. Both will cost a bit to run but its a small price to pay for your health and cheaper than moving, where you may get the same problem again.

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The LL will not want to see his house ruined with black mould. Have a word with him and ask him to supply and fit either a tumble drier or, as said before, a dehumidifier. Both will cost a bit to run but its a small price to pay for your health and cheaper than moving, where you may get the same problem again.

Update: builder round, reported about three different leaks. Broken tiles and something else the missus failed to comprehend.

So I have one broken bit of furniture, one out for repair, some damaged clothing and a lot of inconvenience due to their failure to maintain the house.

Do I go after some compensation? How?

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In fairness to the OP, the mould sounds like it may not be all their fault.

We have also recently had new double glazed windows fitted. The old windows had a "drip" filter, but the new ones don't. This isn't against buildings regs as the new double glazed windows should have a security mode on them - that is you open them very slightly and pull the handle down, locking them.

We have had very small damp areas appear around the window in the bathroom and in the bedroom. The solution is to open the windows for a bit or leave them on "security mode" for a few hours - I do this when I get in from work.

Would also echo the common sense - leave the extractor fan and windows open in the bathroom for a few hours after a shower. You should also open the windows if you have clothes and towels drying on radiators.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
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      • up 5%



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