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jones87

O/t Charities Buying Brand New Vans

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The local Barnardos has recently invested in a brand new 60 plate Ford luton van.

Perhaps Ford gifted it but who knows? Is there a way of finding out?

My local town centre is full of charity shops :angry:

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I've been told recently that one woman has managed to employ 7 members of her family at various shops at a charity in Oldham.

One of these new managers has removed the chair from by the till and when one volunteer mentioned it they were told "You're only here for 3 hours you don't need to sit down"

This same charity removed the fuse from the heaters in one shop and restricted the number of brews to one per shift.

They also throw away the vast majority of donations too... But I think that's the same with most charity shops.

Give your old tat to local scout groups when they have a jumble sale instead. A little more effort maybe but puts money directly back into young people's activities in the area and not wages for nepotism.

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The local Barnardos has recently invested in a brand new 60 plate Ford luton van.

Perhaps Ford gifted it but who knows? Is there a way of finding out?

My local town centre is full of charity shops :angry:

Should be able to get their accounts from the charities commission but they won't be filed for a while after the year end and I'm not sure how much detail they go into.

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I remember being in a Red Cross charity shop in central Scotland. The Area manager was haranguing the manageress for her lack of sales in the last month.

I was shocked at his attitude and ventured over and told him if his charity remembered these were donated items and didn't price them so high for re-sale then perhaps the lack of sales could be turned around. It obviously didn't please him but at least he moved the lecture to the back shop. Needless to say I don't go near many Red Cross charity shops now.

I was visiting my sister and she took me round the local charity shops for a mooch. We overheard a couple of managers having hissy fits on staff because things weren't arranged right. I thought it was disgraceful to have that attitude with staff. If we hadn't had the kids with us I would have gone and stuck my beak in.

Some of the managers of these shops are arses.

Stock free, staff free, discounted rates etc, so why on earth do they price themselves as dear as tesco?

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My local town centre is full of charity shops :angry:

Mainly because as the retail economy has imploded and smaller shops destroyed by multiples and Hypermarketeers, such as Tesco, the shop premises would have remained empty.

After a short period of time (Varies town by town) full UBR (Business Rates) are levied on empty shops, factories and warehouses.

Most town centre commercial properties are owned by investors, such as insurance companies etc as part of their portfolio.

"Charities", are relieved of paying full rates: varies from nothing to 25%.

Thus it is cheaper for a property investor to let the shop to a "Charity" free and pay the reduced rate UBR and insist the "Charity" picks up the cost of utilities.

I write "Charities", purposively, since today, "Charity" is a big and booming business!

Look in The Grauniad each Thursday and be amazed at salaries and perks offered for Senior Charity funds raisers and CEOs.

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Mainly because as the retail economy has imploded and smaller shops destroyed by multiples and Hypermarketeers, such as Tesco, the shop premises would have remained empty.

After a short period of time (Varies town by town) full UBR (Business Rates) are levied on empty shops, factories and warehouses.

Most town centre commercial properties are owned by investors, such as insurance companies etc as part of their portfolio.

"Charities", are relieved of paying full rates: varies from nothing to 25%.

Thus it is cheaper for a property investor to let the shop to a "Charity" free and pay the reduced rate UBR and insist the "Charity" picks up the cost of utilities.

I write "Charities", purposively, since today, "Charity" is a big and booming business!

Look in The Grauniad each Thursday and be amazed at salaries and perks offered for Senior Charity funds raisers and CEOs.

That explains that then!

I've never quite understood why people volunteer when their colleagues are getting paid :blink:

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They also throw away the vast majority of donations too... But I think that's the same with most charity shops.

What a joke.

How about instead of giving billions in money to Africa they put charity bins for old clothes to send to Africa.No wastage , no middlemen reaping big salaries.

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What a joke.

How about instead of giving billions in money to Africa they put charity bins for old clothes to send to Africa.No wastage , no middlemen reaping big salaries.

The "charity bags" thorugh your door are a bigger scandal than the charity shops IMO.

Private companies give a % of the money they make selling the stuff in the eastern european countries. Not asked any what % it is but they'll just see it as "free money" - when it's really robbing them directly of donations.

Charity should begin at home.

Give stuff to your friends and family, neighbours, and local organisations.

There's a rag man who pays £1 a bin bag for stuff after the local jumbles (Although he had started paying more I'm not sure it's more thna £3 a bag yet)

I assume this is the same sort of system some charity shops use. Although I know non-clothing items used to be deliberately broken and/or left to rot so had to be taken to the tip at one shop.

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The "charity bags" thorugh your door are a bigger scandal than the charity shops IMO.

Private companies give a % of the money they make selling the stuff in the eastern european countries. Not asked any what % it is but they'll just see it as "free money" - when it's really robbing them directly of donations.

Charity should begin at home.

Give stuff to your friends and family, neighbours, and local organisations.

There's a rag man who pays £1 a bin bag for stuff after the local jumbles (Although he had started paying more I'm not sure it's more thna £3 a bag yet)

I assume this is the same sort of system some charity shops use. Although I know non-clothing items used to be deliberately broken and/or left to rot so had to be taken to the tip at one shop.

We go so many of those so called charity bags through the door, that I swear if I put just one item of clothing in each I'd have nothing left to wear!

That said, I don't want them stop posting through the door. We use them to stick our rubbish in when we decorate, and we'll have saved a fair few quid on bags by the time we've finished renovating this place! B)

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The local Barnardos has recently invested in a brand new 60 plate Ford luton van.

Perhaps Ford gifted it but who knows? Is there a way of finding out?

My local town centre is full of charity shops :angry:

Like most big organisations I would imagine the van is leased. The company might even give charities a discount.

The financially astute amongst you will no doubt point out that its probably cheaper for the shop to buy a £4k Transit (example) than pay £250 a month in lease fees. But when you consider the repair and maintenance bills of reguarly driven vans plus the fact there's no guarantee the cheap second hand vehicle won't break down and end up beyond economical repair then they probably are as well going with a leasing arrangement. Especially if they lease a lot of vans and get a fleet discount.

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I remember being in a Red Cross charity shop in central Scotland. The Area manager was haranguing the manageress for her lack of sales in the last month.

I was shocked at his attitude and ventured over and told him if his charity remembered these were donated items and didn't price them so high for re-sale then perhaps the lack of sales could be turned around. It obviously didn't please him but at least he moved the lecture to the back shop. Needless to say I don't go near many Red Cross charity shops now.

It's very bad management to give an employee a reprimand in public.

It should be done in private, behind a closed door.

Another standard that has fallen.

(shakes head)

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A 'Charity' only has to give a small percentage of donations to Charity.

No idea exactly what the statute is, but there is plenty of room for profit. (Or non-profit perks.)

The abundance of 'Charities' in our high streets does appear to be making people suspicious.

Oxfam in Ireland is reporting that its stocks are 'critically low'.

Fall in Donations Blamed on Recession

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There's a rag man who pays £1 a bin bag for stuff after the local jumbles (Although he had started paying more I'm not sure it's more thna £3 a bag yet)

I assume this is the same sort of system some charity shops use. Although I know non-clothing items used to be deliberately broken and/or left to rot so had to be taken to the tip at one shop.

I remember from my childhood in Glasgow, giving the local ragman a bin bag full of old clothing & getting a balloon in return :angry:

I used to frequent the charity shops quite alot in my skint years. Noticed their prices gradually going up until they were starting to have sales themselves :blink:

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Like most big organisations I would imagine the van is leased. The company might even give charities a discount.

The financially astute amongst you will no doubt point out that its probably cheaper for the shop to buy a £4k Transit (example) than pay £250 a month in lease fees. But when you consider the repair and maintenance bills of reguarly driven vans plus the fact there's no guarantee the cheap second hand vehicle won't break down and end up beyond economical repair then they probably are as well going with a leasing arrangement. Especially if they lease a lot of vans and get a fleet discount.

I would tend to agree. If you buy/lease a new vehicle your cost of money and depreciation is fairly high but you unscheduled repair costs are pretty low if not zero. If you buy and old vehicle the cost of money and depreciation is much lower but you probably are going to have a lot of unscheduled repair costs. In addition, during the unscheduled downtime the vehicle is not working for you. Really a case of swings and roundabouts, quite possibly the new vehicle is the cheaper if you can afford it.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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