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Can't see how we'll get through the next few months without a fuel shortage either a proper one or a panic induced one. The tanker drivers are due a ballot in February and it seems a no-brainer they will vote to strike. Now we have increasing oil prices on the back of the Egyptian protests and fears over the Suez canal. Undoubtedly the army will protect the canal for now so while the public are respecting the army things should be ok but if Mubarak stays it will be something obvious to disrupt, my guess is it won't happen, but still....

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I'm pretty sure you can legally store only 2x 10L metal cans of petrol at home but you can keep as much diesel as you can get you hands on and (not 100% sure) i think there is no legal requirement for it to be in a special container even if they try to tell you that at the forecourt.

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I'm pretty sure you can legally store only 2x 10L metal cans of petrol at home but you can keep as much diesel as you can get you hands on and (not 100% sure) i think there is no legal requirement for it to be in a special container even if they try to tell you that at the forecourt.

Purely coincidentally I had one or two cans on a list of useful/essential items that I have been meaning to buy along with other items which I identified as missing from our home that, at some point in time, will likely be wanted (e.g candles, proper equipped first aid box, etc etc).

Dont see the point in paying rip-off prices for brand new cans but am wary of buying army surplus (which doesnt seem that much cheaper).

Any recommendations of cheap but good quality suppliers?

Edited by anonguest

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I'm pretty sure you can legally store only 2x 10L metal cans of petrol at home but you can keep as much diesel as you can get you hands on and (not 100% sure) i think there is no legal requirement for it to be in a special container even if they try to tell you that at the forecourt.

The limit is:

Petrol: 10L, stored in 2 or more containers of up to 5l capacity. The containers must be designed specifically for the purpose of storing petrol and must be in good condition with airtight lids. Petrol can only be stored short term as it deteriorates and seperates and if stored too long can damage you engine.

Diesel: As much as you want, stored however you want, as long as you want. Dig a hole in your garden, put in a pond liner, fill it with diesel... all good. Diesel is NOT flamable. (Unless above 60c or aerosolised.) The only restrictions as to do with protecting the environment... you have to be careful to avoid spills... technically you can create problems if you contaminate the soil on your land.

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petrol is 20l if in two 10l metal containers

or 10l if in two 5l plastic containers.

The Petroleum Spirit (Motor Vehicles etc.) Regulations 1929 and the Petroleum Spirit (Plastic Containers) Regulations 1982 limit the amount of petrol that can be kept in a domestic garage or within six metres of a building (e.g. most domestic driveways). The limit is a maximum of two suitable metal containers each of a maximum capacity of ten litres or two plastic containers (which have to be of an approved design) each of a maximum capacity of five litres. These limits also apply to any containers kept in a vehicle parked in the garage or on the driveway (but not to the internal fuel tank of the vehicle). Under no circumstances should the petrol containers be stored in the home itself.

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The limit is:

Petrol: 10L, stored in 2 or more containers of up to 5l capacity. The containers must be designed specifically for the purpose of storing petrol and must be in good condition with airtight lids. Petrol can only be stored short term as it deteriorates and seperates and if stored too long can damage you engine.

Diesel: As much as you want, stored however you want, as long as you want. Dig a hole in your garden, put in a pond liner, fill it with diesel... all good. Diesel is NOT flamable. (Unless above 60c or aerosolised.) The only restrictions as to do with protecting the environment... you have to be careful to avoid spills... technically you can create problems if you contaminate the soil on your land.

Also.... presumably, for petrol, such cans should only be used (i.e filled) shortly before anticipated 'trouble' because, as I understand it, petrol has a relatively short shelf life? Long duration stored unleaded will not be much use or very good to use in modern car engines?

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Also.... presumably, for petrol, such cans should only be used (i.e filled) shortly before anticipated 'trouble' because, as I understand it, petrol has a relatively short shelf life? Long duration stored unleaded will not be much use or very good to use in modern car engines?

Petrol lasts 5-6 months. Non winter bikers know this, to prevent carb or FI varnish they brim their tanks. First ride of the season you ride hard and fast and burn all of the fuel out of the tank and there are few issues.

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Purely coincidentally I had one or two cans on a list of useful/essential items that I have been meaning to buy along with other items which I identified as missing from our home that, at some point in time, will likely be wanted (e.g candles, proper equipped first aid box, etc etc).

Dont see the point in paying rip-off prices for brand new cans but am wary of buying army surplus (which doesnt seem that much cheaper).

Any recommendations of cheap but good quality suppliers?

Old cars are excellent ways to store petrol. A mate keeps a couple of knackered old jags on his land which allows him to store tons of the stuff.

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Was looking for a stash place for biodiesel, can get it delivered in 205 litre drums which is about 3 tank fulls (3 months or 2000+ miles).

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Petrol lasts 5-6 months. Non winter bikers know this, to prevent carb or FI varnish they brim their tanks. First ride of the season you ride hard and fast and burn all of the fuel out of the tank and there are few issues.

There are a number of fuel stabiliser additive products on the market.

Briggs & Stratton say their product preserves petrol for up to 24 months.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Briggs-Stratton-Additive-Stabiliser-999005/dp/B003374F9E/ref=pd_cp_auto_1

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There are a number of fuel stabiliser additive products on the market.

Briggs & Stratton say their product preserves petrol for up to 24 months.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Briggs-Stratton-Additive-Stabiliser-999005/dp/B003374F9E/ref=pd_cp_auto_1

This is interesting. In the absence of such preservatives (or indeed even with!) it would seem that Mad Max scenarios will be very short lived indeed - as beyond a year or so there wont be any useable petrol at all!?

Or is it he case that petrol is still adequately useable in a cars for a very long time (surely it retains its flammability?) but hust that the performance will be sluggish?

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petrol is 20l if in two 10l metal containers

or 10l if in two 5l plastic containers.

The Petroleum Spirit (Motor Vehicles etc.) Regulations 1929 and the Petroleum Spirit (Plastic Containers) Regulations 1982 limit the amount of petrol that can be kept in a domestic garage or within six metres of a building (e.g. most domestic driveways). The limit is a maximum of two suitable metal containers each of a maximum capacity of ten litres or two plastic containers (which have to be of an approved design) each of a maximum capacity of five litres. These limits also apply to any containers kept in a vehicle parked in the garage or on the driveway (but not to the internal fuel tank of the vehicle). Under no circumstances should the petrol containers be stored in the home itself.

You can get a Petroleum Licence from your local fire brigade if you wish to dispense or/and store larger quantities of fuel. It would cost about £40 for a year's licence to store up to several thousand litres of fuel. You will also have to satisfy the brigade that it's being stored safely.

Edited by Take Me Back To London!

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You can get a Petroleum Licence from your local fire brigade if you wish to dispense or/and store larger quantities of fuel. It would cost about £40 for a year's licence to store up to several thousand litres of fuel. You will also have to satisfy the brigade that it's being stored safely.

There seems to be a bit of a gap. You can store 20L at home but storage of over 275L requires a license.

Anyone who wishes to store larger quantities than this, or use larger containers, is required to notify the local Petroleum Licensing Authority (PLA) and to store the petrol in a prescribed manner set out in the 1929 Regulations mentioned above - enquirers who want further details should contact their local PLA. Storage of more than 275 litres (60 gallons) of petrol requires a petrol licence - again, contact the local PLA.

Also, although diesel doesnt go off microbes and bacteria do grow in it and will feck an engine. It has to be stored right to prevent condensation and chemical can be used to stop crap growing in it.

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This is interesting. In the absence of such preservatives (or indeed even with!) it would seem that Mad Max scenarios will be very short lived indeed - as beyond a year or so there wont be any useable petrol at all!?

Or is it he case that petrol is still adequately useable in a cars for a very long time (surely it retains its flammability?) but hust that the performance will be sluggish?

Petrol still works if it is old... the thing is it will work at a cost of engine life, as all of the lighter components will have vaporised or separated. Petrol has this stuff in them to lubricate or prevent early detonation thus extending engine life which is why 250K on a car is not a biggie.

You can run your car on panel wipe (petrol's cousin) cosyts £9 for 5 ltres, but because it has none of the additives your engine will die pretty quick. Its enough to get you to say Dover from Manchester but the car will be damaged.

A great example is this:

It's like with leaded petrol the additive lead coated the valves so you did not get valve burn or cracking. Without it the engine will still run but don't be surprised if your valve heads crack in the next 10K

Diesels however are a lot more resilient.

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Just because you could doesn't mean you should....

The idea of your nutty neighbours building their very own Bunsfield is truly terrifying.... a 5 litre can of Petrol "going up" is enough to make you $hit your pants let alone a back garden crammed with old bathtubs and inflatable padding pools brimmed with the stuff.

Watching next door vanish in a giant fire ball might be quite amusing in the split second before the shock wave removes the side of your own house and the searing heat make charcoal of the missus & kids.

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Just because you could doesn't mean you should....

The idea of your nutty neighbours building their very own Bunsfield is truly terrifying.... a 5 litre can of Petrol "going up" is enough to make you $hit your pants let alone a back garden crammed with old bathtubs and inflatable padding pools brimmed with the stuff.

Tsk..

This exemplifies a major problem with you UK people and why it is doomed. You are all so risk adverse that it hinders you in almost anything and everything you do because you're all so incredibly cowed. The country won't be put back together with attitudes like that...

And before you say it I had a fuel leak on the M6 with my extended range fuel tank, it caught fire while I was still riding it. Jumped off grabbed as much grass and branches as possible and subdued the flames.

Another bike also burst into flames (with me next to it) outside an MOT station (after it had passed with flying colours). I dived out the way and the the MOT tester dived for cover and we ran and got the fire extinguishers.

The time when I wanted to build my own wood burner everybody said I would die, I'm still here... John for instance regularly welds and drills acetylene tanks and he is fine.

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The limit is:

Petrol: 10L, stored in 2 or more containers of up to 5l capacity. The containers must be designed specifically for the purpose of storing petrol and must be in good condition with airtight lids. Petrol can only be stored short term as it deteriorates and seperates and if stored too long can damage you engine.

Diesel: As much as you want, stored however you want, as long as you want. Dig a hole in your garden, put in a pond liner, fill it with diesel... all good. Diesel is NOT flamable. (Unless above 60c or aerosolised.) The only restrictions as to do with protecting the environment... you have to be careful to avoid spills... technically you can create problems if you contaminate the soil on your land.

So diesel doesnt detiorate, ever?

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Just because you could doesn't mean you should....

The idea of your nutty neighbours building their very own Bunsfield is truly terrifying.... a 5 litre can of Petrol "going up" is enough to make you $hit your pants let alone a back garden crammed with old bathtubs and inflatable padding pools brimmed with the stuff.

Watching next door vanish in a giant fire ball might be quite amusing in the split second before the shock wave removes the side of your own house and the searing heat make charcoal of the missus & kids.

Storing petrol in a wheelie bin!

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1315331/News-in-brief.html

Fuel hoarder sentenced

12 September 2000: Panic as the pumps run dry

A TAXI driver who tried to beat the fuel crisis by storing petrol in a wheelie-bin at home was given a suspended prison sentence yesterday. Saquib Bashir, 28, caused a major alert, leading to the evacuation of 60 neighbouring properties and a £100,000 clean-up bill when fuel melted the bottom of the plastic bin and leaked into the cellar of his terraced house.

At Derby Crown Court, Bashir admitted storing petrol without a licence and in non-metal containers. He was sentenced to eight months' imprisonment, suspended for two years, and ordered to pay £1,000 costs. Bashir had stockpiled 90 litres of fuel in a wheelie-bin, a beer barrel and a cooking-oil container at his home in Normanton, Derby. Later he told trading standards officers that he had no idea that petrol was so flammable. By Maurice Weaver

Edited by Take Me Back To London!

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Can't see how we'll get through the next few months without a fuel shortage either a proper one or a panic induced one. The tanker drivers are due a ballot in February and it seems a no-brainer they will vote to strike. Now we have increasing oil prices on the back of the Egyptian protests and fears over the Suez canal. Undoubtedly the army will protect the canal for now so while the public are respecting the army things should be ok but if Mubarak stays it will be something obvious to disrupt, my guess is it won't happen, but still....

I think you highlight a very serious situation which could easily hit us.

We could see a fuel shortage caused by a disruption in the local delivery chain. In my opinion we will not see a shortage per se due to the geopolitical situation, but very high prices which will curtail consumption severely.

In any event, I believe it's wise to keep the car topped up and some extra spare fuel, kept safely and legally, which would be used and replenished on a rotational basis.

If anyone wants to buy fuel cans, do it before the panic!

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There seems to be a bit of a gap. You can store 20L at home but storage of over 275L requires a license.

you can store up to 275L without a licence as long as it is so far from a dwelling and has a trench around it, and probably some hi viz requirement or other.

Also, although diesel doesnt go off microbes and bacteria do grow in it and will feck an engine. It has to be stored right to prevent condensation and chemical can be used to stop crap growing in it.

i use and refill my diesel stash once a year during winter diesel season, not much hassle for the piece of mind it gives.

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you can store up to 275L without a licence as long as it is so far from a dwelling and has a trench around it, and probably some hi viz requirement or other.

i use and refill my diesel stash once a year during winter diesel season, not much hassle for the piece of mind it gives.

You are the first that I have come across with a fuel stash (aside from yanks who are hoarding everything from water to ammo).

Makes sense I suppose. I take it that if you stash fuel just in case then you have food and other essentials that would also dry up during such a shortage?

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You are the first that I have come across with a fuel stash (aside from yanks who are hoarding everything from water to ammo).

Makes sense I suppose. I take it that if you stash fuel just in case then you have food and other essentials that would also dry up during such a shortage?

Some but not so much food, i can't remember a time when food ran out but the pumps have run dry once every couple of years of late and it happens over night at the words "no need to panic". I have enough to get to work for a month, maybe 2 if i'm careful, i earn only when i work so need to keep working and it's too far to cycle. In a crisis presumably essentials like food would be sorted out first and part of that would be fuel being reserved for hauliers and emergency services, it would have to be completely back to normal before it was back to normal availability which if we're talking a Suez blockade with tankers needing to round Africa instead it could easily be months of shortages. So i consider fuel more important to keep a substantial stock.

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