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Sibley's Love Child

House With No Central Heating

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As per title really. My wife and I viewed a house today (two bed terrace, built late 20s) with an asking price of 'offers over £145k'.

Two things actually; firstly - and i'm only thinking 'back of a fag packet' calculations - roughly how much would it cost to install gas central heating in a typical two-up/two-down?

Secondly (and i'm hoping Peterborough Agent or Mildura are knocking-about in particular), when a vendor states x£ or over, is it still worth going in with a lower offer than asking. Principally, i'm thinking of knocking-off x grand taking into account the work required to get gas heating installed.

Actually, thirdly, does anyone have any experience of electric heating (as a fallback position)?

Thanks in advance for any input.

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Modern storage heating is very effective. Slimmer etc in the room and with thermostatic boost controls and convector boosters etc.

Also you can get water filled radiators in a system akin to that you tend to associate as gch heating which are run off an electric boiler. That way you avoid need for annualservicing/ boiler check as it's a big emmersion heater type element in the tank.

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Modern storage heating is very effective. Slimmer etc in the room and with thermostatic boost controls and convector boosters etc.

Also you can get water filled radiators in a system akin to that you tend to associate as gch heating which are run off an electric boiler. That way you avoid need for annualservicing/ boiler check as it's a big emmersion heater type element in the tank.

Cheers for the input Chris although - as an office monkey - most of that is Greek to me. How much would that set me back, do you reckon?

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Steer well clear of storage heating, just have a look about on google, plenty of threads on various forums slating the running cost, eye watering.

If you went for gas central heating depending on what make of boiler you wanted would be about 2-3k.

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As per title really. My wife and I viewed a house today (two bed terrace, built late 20s) with an asking price of 'offers over £145k'.

Two things actually; firstly - and i'm only thinking 'back of a fag packet' calculations - roughly how much would it cost to install gas central heating in a typical two-up/two-down?

Secondly (and i'm hoping Peterborough Agent or Mildura are knocking-about in particular), when a vendor states x£ or over, is it still worth going in with a lower offer than asking. Principally, i'm thinking of knocking-off x grand taking into account the work required to get gas heating installed.

Actually, thirdly, does anyone have any experience of electric heating (as a fallback position)?

Thanks in advance for any input.

If you're doing that level of work, install solar water heating on any south-ish-facing roof. Installing heating from scratch implies a big plumbing job, and given that, the marginal extra cost of pumping through a black panel on the roof should be well worth it.

Note - that's solar water heating. Not to be confused with solar PV (electricity generation) which still costs real money to install (not necessarily your money, but that's another story).

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Steer well clear of storage heating, just have a look about on google, plenty of threads on various forums slating the running cost, eye watering.

Only if you have old inefficient system.

In a small, well insulated, house you can run storage radiators for less than you might have to pay for servicing your gas boiler every year.

(though I accept that they are somewhat less controllable than CH)

tim

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Ello Ello Ello? What's all this then? Someone wants my advice? :)

Offers in excess of can work very well if priced right but is a complete waste of time unless the guide price is so low it has people falling over themselves to make an offer. Eg. House worth about 100, normal vendor might ask 120 (20% too much as per usual) oieo price should be about 65. Low enough to get even the tightest HPCer reaching for their calculator. The house prob will sell in the end for 96.

What usually happens is vendor wants 110 on this house that's nominally worth 100 so instead of asking 120 tries oieo 110 (still too high). I'd say offer away and as per usual recommend you offer what it is worth to you (or of course a bit lower to get things warmed up)

As for the heating get gas central every time. Assuming gas is connected to the property I think a full system costs less than 5k (but that is a guess - also check for subsidies). Seven years ago Mrs Agent and I rented a poorly insulated Victorian prop with gas fires in the lounge and dining room and elec storage heaters everywhere else. As i'm sure you know they are designed to take the cheap rate electricity in overnight and release the heat slowly through the day. Because we were out all day, we never got to use these properly and ended up having to charge them in the day on high tartifs to get any heat in the evenings. It cost us a small fortune and we got a shock when the lekky bill came through so we ended up switching them off getting a bigger douvet and just relying on the gas fire in the lounge to keep us warm watching telly.

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Only if you have old inefficient system.

In a small, well insulated, house you can run storage radiators for less than you might have to pay for servicing your gas boiler every year.

(though I accept that they are somewhat less controllable than CH)

tim

Well the OP did say a 1920's house. No cavity wall,vented timber floors............ :blink:

Anyway no personal experience, except my sister had new storage heaters in 2003, the bills where massive for electric. In a modern flat.

Read more up to date accounts, various threads on MSE about them, the bills are eye watering, plenty of people even go to the expense of paying for a gas mains to be installed in their property.

A new boiler hardly needs servicing straight away.

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Well the OP did say a 1920's house. No cavity wall,vented timber floors............ :blink:

Anyway no personal experience, except my sister had new storage heaters in 2003, the bills where massive for electric. In a modern flat.

Read more up to date accounts, various threads on MSE about them, the bills are eye watering, plenty of people even go to the expense of paying for a gas mains to be installed in their property.

A new boiler hardly needs servicing straight away.

Depends upon what you mean by massive.

In a normal (uninsulated) house you might use 8-10,000 Kwh of "heating" (and that is a lot!). The current rate of night leccy is about 5.5p and the rate for gas is 3.5p. So that means you are paying 150-200 pounds more for electric heating than gas heating.

I would suggest that you will be very lucky (averaged over the its lifetime) not to pay that much per year to service the boiler.

The figure looks large because it is all on the one bill, rather than being spread across three.

tim

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If you're considering storage heaters, you must look at fan storage heaters; these have much more insulation than standard storage heaters and are able to hold the heat until when you want by operating a very slow fan to draw the heat out. You can time and temperature control the fan, so it only operates when you want it to and when its cold.

The reason old storage heaters get slated is because they let heat out regardless of the temperature and whether you're there or not, unlike the above.

Running costs for these are on par with gas, a fact that can be reflected by an EPC/SAP rating. Like another poster said, with very low, if any maintenance costs over a 30 year period. Not to mention installation costs.

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Ello Ello Ello? What's all this then? Someone wants my advice? :)

Offers in excess of can work very well if priced right but is a complete waste of time unless the guide price is so low it has people falling over themselves to make an offer. Eg. House worth about 100, normal vendor might ask 120 (20% too much as per usual) oieo price should be about 65. Low enough to get even the tightest HPCer reaching for their calculator. The house prob will sell in the end for 96.

What usually happens is vendor wants 110 on this house that's nominally worth 100 so instead of asking 120 tries oieo 110 (still too high). I'd say offer away and as per usual recommend you offer what it is worth to you (or of course a bit lower to get things warmed up)

As for the heating get gas central every time. Assuming gas is connected to the property I think a full system costs less than 5k (but that is a guess - also check for subsidies). Seven years ago Mrs Agent and I rented a poorly insulated Victorian prop with gas fires in the lounge and dining room and elec storage heaters everywhere else. As i'm sure you know they are designed to take the cheap rate electricity in overnight and release the heat slowly through the day. Because we were out all day, we never got to use these properly and ended up having to charge them in the day on high tartifs to get any heat in the evenings. It cost us a small fortune and we got a shock when the lekky bill came through so we ended up switching them off getting a bigger douvet and just relying on the gas fire in the lounge to keep us warm watching telly.

Thanks for the advice re: offers over x. For what it's worth I feel the asking price isn't too unreasonable as that would be back to 2004 prices. I'd still like to wait a bit longer for the fabled HPC but it does tick all the boxes ie mortgage repayments would be equal to current rent and it's in very good state of decor (not to mention long-suffering wife). The vendor is an old lady that has lived there all her life and wants to move further out (geographically) and buy a bungelow. I'm feeling a certain amount of cognitive dissonance as the HPCer in me wants to pitch the 'cheeky offer' but at the same time i'd be loathe to screw her over. Decisions, decisions.

With regards to the heating issue, we'll probably lump - in the end - for gas central heating and get the vendor to take the knock for the estimated cost; say 5k.

Edit: Of course, this is all predicated on an offer being accepted in the first place....

Edited by Sibley's Love Child

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Depends upon what you mean by massive.

In a normal (uninsulated) house you might use 8-10,000 Kwh of "heating" (and that is a lot!). The current rate of night leccy is about 5.5p and the rate for gas is 3.5p. So that means you are paying 150-200 pounds more for electric heating than gas heating.

I would suggest that you will be very lucky (averaged over the its lifetime) not to pay that much per year to service the boiler.

The figure looks large because it is all on the one bill, rather than being spread across three.

tim

I was thinking of buying somewhere myself that use storage heaters.

Looking around on the internet i couldn't find anyone who had a good word to say about them. Infact many people go to the expense of installing a gas main,central heating and ripping out the economy 7/10 meter. Well that's enough of a statement for me.

When you come in from work on the night all the heat is gone so you need to use the day tariff or sit there in the cold, even fan assisted heaters don't overcome this.

Who services a boiler? It's a con, no remedial work can be done to prolong it's life, when it breaks you fix it.

Want peach of mind, British Gas do cover for about £100 a year.

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  • 285 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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