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How Are Journalists Hacking Mobiles These Days?

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In the good old days, you rang the remote access voicemail number, entered your target's mobile number at the prompt, and then tried the default pin code - 0000 or 1234 for example - in the hope that the phone's owner hadn't changed the pin when they first got the code. That allowed you to listen to any stored voicemails.

Nowadays, you can't access your voicemail remotely until you have set up your own pin code though, so are journalists simply trying all numbers, starting at 0000 and working their way to 9999 until they find the right one?

The other things you can do now are access vulnarabilities in Bluetooth or get the owner to click a link in an email or visit a hacked website, so that they download a trojan. However, in Tessa Jowell's case, reported today, it was her network provider that informed her that someone was hacking her phone. I'm pretty sure that Vodafone, Orange or whoever wouldn't be able to tell if someone was using a Bluetooth hack so do you think the journalists were just trying the pin code thing? I suppose they could try the obvious ones like her birthday DDMM, or those of her family members but it seems like a bit of a long shot.

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In the good old days, you rang the remote access voicemail number, entered your target's mobile number at the prompt, and then tried the default pin code - 0000 or 1234 for example - in the hope that the phone's owner hadn't changed the pin when they first got the code. That allowed you to listen to any stored voicemails.

Nowadays, you can't access your voicemail remotely until you have set up your own pin code though, so are journalists simply trying all numbers, starting at 0000 and working their way to 9999 until they find the right one?

The other things you can do now are access vulnarabilities in Bluetooth or get the owner to click a link in an email or visit a hacked website, so that they download a trojan. However, in Tessa Jowell's case, reported today, it was her network provider that informed her that someone was hacking her phone. I'm pretty sure that Vodafone, Orange or whoever wouldn't be able to tell if someone was using a Bluetooth hack so do you think the journalists were just trying the pin code thing? I suppose they could try the obvious ones like her birthday DDMM, or those of her family members but it seems like a bit of a long shot.

The way it was explained on TV the other night they use two phones. Ring the target on one and when they answer ring them again from the other which will mean that it goes to voicemail as they are on the phone. They then enter the pin which means they can access their messages, apparently.

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The way it was explained on TV the other night they use two phones. Ring the target on one and when they answer ring them again from the other which will mean that it goes to voicemail as they are on the phone. They then enter the pin which means they can access their messages, apparently.

But how do they get the pin?

By the way 6538, is your pin 6538?

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But how do they get the pin?

By the way 6538, is your pin 6538?

They just use the 0000 default.

We'll say it is 6538 - now start trying to find my mobile number, there must be tens of billions of possibilities. It starts 07 so there a few billion knocked off for you. Personally, I wouldn't bother. Nothing anyone ever says to me is worth listening to.

I think this method of attack has been blocked now anyway. What's her face (Labour harpie who's name escapes me) was just ont the news saying that she'd been hacked just last week and ut was her phone company who told her. They said her voicemail had been accessed by someone who was't her which must be pretty easy for their softare to pick up when you think about it.

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If politicians are as daft as civil servants they probably just leave their phones and other things that might contain sensitive data lying around on trains.

Funny how the politicians are so bothered about it when its their information that might fall into the wrong hands.

I seem to remember them playing it down when they lost other peoples personal data.

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I'm probably being utterly thick, but do all providers (mobile) have passwords to access voicemail? I'm with 3, I dial 123 to access my voicemail, and i'm in...I take it a voicemail account is directly attached to the number, and you can't access my account from any other number?

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you dont think that every single email and text is monitored?

They are! Just dont say the buzz words and you wont get your door kicked in :D

Want to hack other phones? Out of your reach and would be watched anyways.

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I'm probably being utterly thick, but do all providers (mobile) have passwords to access voicemail? I'm with 3, I dial 123 to access my voicemail, and i'm in...I take it a voicemail account is directly attached to the number, and you can't access my account from any other number?

Orange uses 123 as well, I think. Question is.....how do you dial the speaking clock as that is 123?

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Orange uses 123 as well, I think. Question is.....how do you dial the speaking clock as that is 123?

*Facepalm*... I wondered why that bloke kept leaving me messages saying what time it was. ;)

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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