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Dave Beans

North V South: Tonight (Itv)

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http://www.itv.com/news/tonight/episodes/northversussouth/

Should be on ITV1+1 at 8.30. Watch out for the lesser spotted Prezza...

For every 1 private sector job created in the north, 10 are created in the south :o

The North South divide highlights big differences in almost everything – from jobs and health to education and wealth. Tonight we investigate whether it is damaging the UK economy and its people.

Reporter Jonny Maitland tells the story of its impact through the lives of two families. Here’s a story of two Steves’: Northern Steve and Southern Steve. They live only 200 miles apart, but there’s a world of difference between them.

Steve Burrows lives with his wife Alison and son Phil in Teesside, in the North East of England.

His life was turned upside down when the biggest call centre operator in the North East, Garlands, went into administration with the loss of more than 1000 workers last year.

He was suddenly thrown out of work leaving his wife Alison as the only wage earner in the household. After no success finding a new job, he decided to set up his own business as a handyman plumber and double glazing repairer.

As he builds up his business “Swift Repairs of Guisborough”, Steve hopes he can employ his 18-year-old son Phil who is just completing a plumbing course. Phil has applied for more than 100 jobs without success.

But Steve can only afford to set up as white van man because his wife has a relatively secure public sector job.

Contrast that with “Steve Down South”. Steve Newell works for an expanding hi-tech company in Milton Keynes, in the South East. In a report out this week, the town is identified as one of the best areas in the country for economic growth.

In the South East, unemployment is running at 6.1% - well below the national average - and workers’ take home pay averages £80 a week more than the North East.

Steve Newell has been with the same firm for 20 years ago – and his two grown-up sons also work for the company. He seems blissfully unaware of the gap between North and South.

“I didn’t realise there was such a thing as a North South divide,” he tells the programme.

Tonight wanted to find out whether there was a North v South divide in terms of work attitude. So, we commissioned a survey through Totaljobs.com. It showed:

• 61% more respondents in the South would be prepared to travel 2+ hours each day to a new job compared to those in the North.

• 16% more respondents in the North would be willing to take a pay cut of 5% or more compared to those in the South.

Expert Professor Danny Dorling, of Sheffield University, concludes that the North South divide is bad for us all.

Heart disease is 50 per cent higher in the North East than the South East. Northern pensioners are paid bigger annuities after retirement – up to 10% more - because they die younger. Relative prosperity in the South means extreme pressure on schools, hospitals and the transport system.

The programme also talks to two political heavyweights - former Deputy Prime Minister under Labour, John Prescott, and current Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg. They have differing views of the future.

Lord Prescott tells the Programme: “There is no doubt it’s going to get worse in the North. It’s going to be a bad period for the North and the poorer people.”

But Nick Clegg is upbeat: “Yes we are having to balance the books but we are also investing in your future in the north, in our cities, in our transport infrastructure, in advanced manufacturing, in the kind of thing that has made the North great in the past.

“And I am absolutely sure will make the North of England very great indeed again in the future.”

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i' prefer to be north than facing the south cost of property tbh.

80 quid a week more, 200 quid a week more rental cost.

even more on the mortgage.

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Didn't watch the program but I'm amazed at some of the figures in your quote; amazed to the point of simply not believing them, except perhaps for the difference in take home pay between NE and SE. Still, I suppose the average mortgage probably costs £80 per week more in the South East anyway.

Growing up in South Cumbria (formerly Westmorland), I always used to think the whole country, from from about Preston to the South coast, was exactly the same, except for Wales and perhaps Devon which seemed more like home to me. To be honest, I still feel the same way.

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couldnt be arsed reading the linked post because the north/south thing gets on my tits.

I will tell you this from personal experience and someone that knows.

I took a long time getting used to living down south. No one has any manners, life is too fast.

When you allow a driver to pass they never thank you, no one thanks you. Southerners are fking rude and devoid of basic manners.

I have gone out drinking in southern towns/cities and never thought twice about it. I remember going out in liverpool and some scally trying to steal my mates trainers. I have never once felt uneasy around southern puffs :D but at home do check my wallet frequently.

What really made me yearn for home, after over a decade, was when I went to a shop for fags at christmas. The woman called me 'love' and helped me when I couldnt find something. In 10 years down south no one has ever called me love. And no one has ever given a sh1t.

Northern hospitality is a given just as southern indifference is expected.

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What really made me yearn for home, after over a decade, was when I went to a shop for fags at christmas.

Are Embassy Regal still harder to find in the South than the North?

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Didn't watch the program but I'm amazed at some of the figures in your quote; amazed to the point of simply not believing them, except perhaps for the difference in take home pay between NE and SE. Still, I suppose the average mortgage probably costs £80 per week more in the South East anyway.

Growing up in South Cumbria (formerly Westmorland), I always used to think the whole country, from from about Preston to the South coast, was exactly the same, except for Wales and perhaps Devon which seemed more like home to me. To be honest, I still feel the same way.

I couldn't believe it...actually a semi-interesting programme on ITV. During it, I was expecting Cheryl bloody Cole to pop out of a cake whilst flossing Simon Cowell's ar5e...

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Are Embassy Regal still harder to find in the South than the North?

I have no idea, since living down souff I have had to downgrade to LOGGS ANS bRANCHES.

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Saw the programme but thought it a bit simplistic to think of this as a north/south divide. Some of the worst areas of poverty are in London and if you want to see some real afluence take a drive round the posh bits of Harrogate/Leeds, Cheshire/South Manchester and even some bits of Newcastle.

It's hardly a North/South divide, more a rich/poor divide in pockets of various sizes all over the country - OK there are probably more & larger "poor" pockets in the Northern regions and vice-versa in the home counties.

The look on that womans face (the one that lived in the Cotswolds village) when it was suggested she lived in "the North"! Brilliant, just like she'd stepped in a Dirty Fido with bare feet.

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What really made me yearn for home, after over a decade, was when I went to a shop for fags at christmas. The woman called me 'love' and helped me when I couldnt find something. In 10 years down south no one has ever called me love.

There was a thread on Sheffield Forum started by a lady who found this a bit disconcerting. Having moved to Sheffield from the south, she wasn't used to being called "love" or "duck".

Saw the programme but thought it a bit simplistic to think of this as a north/south divide. Some of the worst areas of poverty are in London and if you want to see some real afluence take a drive round the posh bits of Harrogate/Leeds, Cheshire/South Manchester and even some bits of Newcastle.

Nick Clegg's Sheffield constituency, Hallam, is one of the wealthiest in the country (4th or 5th, depending on the table you read). I was a wee bit surprised TBH.

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The woman called me 'love' and helped me when I couldnt find something.

robin_askwith.JPG

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Saw the programme but thought it a bit simplistic to think of this as a north/south divide. Some of the worst areas of poverty are in London and if you want to see some real afluence take a drive round the posh bits of Harrogate/Leeds, Cheshire/South Manchester and even some bits of Newcastle.

It's hardly a North/South divide, more a rich/poor divide in pockets of various sizes all over the country - OK there are probably more & larger "poor" pockets in the Northern regions and vice-versa in the home counties.

The look on that womans face (the one that lived in the Cotswolds village) when it was suggested she lived in "the North"! Brilliant, just like she'd stepped in a Dirty Fido with bare feet.

I largely agree with this.

When the media want to portray a clichéd view of the north, they mention places like Hull, Moss Side, Middlesbrough and cue the pan shot of rows upon rows of back to backs.

They seem to ignore places like York, Corbridge or Harrogate for some reason.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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