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Vince Suggests Banksters Should Be Run Over On The Motorway

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1351149/Vince-Cable-hits-bonus-culture-bad-taste-bankers-joke.html

Vince Cable in sick gag over bankers being 'mown down on motorways' (yes, he IS the Business Secretary)
By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 5:37 PM on 27th January 2011
Inappropriate gag: Business Secretary Vince Cable, a fierce critic of bankers' bonuses joked about financial services workers being run over
Business Secretary Vince Cable today had a remarkable dig at bankers with a sick gag about one being mown down by a disgruntled driver.
In an astonishing joke with reporters he suggested a motorist would not slow down to avoid a financial services worker in the road.

Good old Vince--if only he could expose the Murdoch scam and the Tories who are behind the deal and he could be next PM!

He is lucky he didn't allude to female banksters/drivers otherwise he would have had to resign for sexism.

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Guest sillybear2

"He asked what the difference was between a cat being found dead on a motorway and a banker being found dead. 'There were skid marks around the cat,' said Mr Cable."

:lol::ph34r:

"What else could one expect on a highway where there were neither speed limits nor painted lines?"

Edited by sillybear2

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"He asked what the difference was between a cat being found dead on a motorway and a banker being found dead. 'There were skid marks around the cat,' said Mr Cable."

:lol::ph34r:

"What else could one expect on a highway where there were neither speed limits nor painted lines?"

Vince is da man!

Pity his thoughts cannot be actualised. Perhaps banksters should all be made to wear striped jerseys and a face mask around their eyes.

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Pity his thoughts cannot be actualised. Perhaps banksters should all be made to wear striped jerseys and a face mask around their eyes.

Why not make them wear gold coloured stars? Brick coloured for estate agents and surveyors? Green for financial advisers? Magnolia for landlords? Red for those borrowing more than 4x salary? Black for those who save? Silver for tin foil hatters? Who else can we scapegoat? :ph34r:

Your average salaried banker is just as stuck in the system as you are. Maybe they live higher and faster, but their children will one day have to also get a job. The children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren of the really rich will never need to work. Someone who has put in 100 hours a week for 30 years isn't successful no matter how much money he makes in his final years - it is too late.

Even the top bankers have no power to change the system. Failure and incompetence are also the fault of the owners of banks who put grocers and scientists in charge of UK banks.

The system was created and is maintained by politicians. Don't believe them when they try to shift the blame to bankers. And remember whose vote those politicians were pandering too. Look in the mirror to see one of the voters.

Vince has no alternative suggestion to a capital funded economy. He disguises his policy bankruptness with popular jokes and shows. Look behind the curtain, Vince's policy is still an economy based on capital.

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Why not make them wear gold coloured stars? Brick coloured for estate agents and surveyors? Green for financial advisers? Magnolia for landlords? Red for those borrowing more than 4x salary? Black for those who save? Silver for tin foil hatters? Who else can we scapegoat? :ph34r:

Your average salaried banker is just as stuck in the system as you are. Maybe they live higher and faster, but their children will one day have to also get a job. The children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren of the really rich will never need to work. Someone who has put in 100 hours a week for 30 years isn't successful no matter how much money he makes in his final years - it is too late.

Even the top bankers have no power to change the system. Failure and incompetence are also the fault of the owners of banks who put grocers and scientists in charge of UK banks.

The system was created and is maintained by politicians. Don't believe them when they try to shift the blame to bankers. And remember whose vote those politicians were pandering too. Look in the mirror to see one of the voters.

Vince has no alternative suggestion to a capital funded economy. He disguises his policy bankruptness with popular jokes and shows. Look behind the curtain, Vince's policy is still an economy based on capital.

Clearly the tops US bankers pocketing over $100m a year have no blame what so ever in this mess, it's all the public's fault for voting in the politicians bank rolled by bankers.

The entire system is corrupt and is in need of purging.

No doubt the press will now have a field day with this joke. However how many of the lower level bankers push loans on the public because of targets?

How many of the worlds top financiers have created more jobs than they destroyed?

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Clearly the tops US bankers pocketing over $100m a year have no blame what so ever in this mess, it's all the public's fault for voting in the politicians bank rolled by bankers.

The entire system is corrupt and is in need of purging.

No doubt the press will now have a field day with this joke. However how many of the lower level bankers push loans on the public because of targets?

How many of the worlds top financiers have created more jobs than they destroyed?

There aren't many bankers, so they don't form much of a democratic force at the end of the day. What was needed for this balls-up was a constituency within the general population who would be more than happy to receive money for doing nothing. This is where the good old UK homeowner comes in, a constituency who persistently and relentlessly voted for their house price to go up (free money) from 1979 thru 2007

The dream of a home-owning democracy with free money for home-owners? Does this ring any bells?

Edited by Stars

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Does this ring any bells?

...Balls ..may be....what was that mortgage he took with his 2x ministerial salary + expenses.....?.... :rolleyes:

Edited by South Lorne

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...Balls ..may be....what was that mortgage he took with his 2x ministerial salary + expenses.....?.... :rolleyes:

As i never mentioned balls, i assume you are replying to some point made by someone else on another thread

Edited to add...

Ahh..ok i got you.

Edited by Stars

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Why not make them wear gold coloured stars? Brick coloured for estate agents and surveyors? Green for financial advisers? Magnolia for landlords? Red for those borrowing more than 4x salary? Black for those who save? Silver for tin foil hatters? Who else can we scapegoat?

Your average salaried banker is just as stuck in the system as you are. Maybe they live higher and faster, but their children will one day have to also get a job. The children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren of the really rich will never need to work. Someone who has put in 100 hours a week for 30 years isn't successful no matter how much money he makes in his final years - it is too late.

Even the top bankers have no power to change the system. Failure and incompetence are also the fault of the owners of banks who put grocers and scientists in charge of UK banks.

The system was created and is maintained by politicians. Don't believe them when they try to shift the blame to bankers. And remember whose vote those politicians were pandering too. Look in the mirror to see one of the voters.

Vince has no alternative suggestion to a capital funded economy. He disguises his policy bankruptness with popular jokes and shows. Look behind the curtain, Vince's policy is still an economy based on capital.

Bullshite- the bankers understood exactly what they were doing and paid huge amounts of money lobbying to get the freedom to do it.

They had their window two years ago to demonstrate some kind of responsibility for the millions of lives they have ruined- but chose instead to campaign against change and carry on paying themselves grotesque sums of money, a kick in the teeth for millions of unemployed and desperate people.

Pay back time is coming once the 'sheeple' finally work out that everything they worked for has be transformed into worthless paper.

The increasingly desperate attempts form the banking lobby to 'put this all behind us' is simply a reflection of their dawning realisation that the pain is now here and they are first in line for a kicking.

If the worst they suffer is a ruined reputation and a few bad taste jokes then they should be grateful for that- there are worse things that could happen.

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A free speaking loose cannon with good intentions.

All the makings of a charismatic leader..

Vince has lived (he is old)...the rest of them like many youngsters today, think they know a lot but in fact they know very little. ;)

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If the worst they suffer is a ruined reputation and a few bad taste jokes then they should be grateful for that- there are worse things that could happen.

Even if you were to run down all the bankers, without many of the British public doing some serious moral examination of their own motives, the problems would just continue

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Davos 2011: JP Morgan boss hits out at 'banker bashing'

An angry Jamie Dimon tells World Economic Forum that blanket criticism of banking industry is unfair.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2011/jan/27/jp-morgan-boss-banker-bashing

Remember to be kind to a bankster today. Should you see one, tip your hat, be deferential and say 'G'day Mr Bankster sir'.

"Blessed are the banksters, for they shall inherit the earth".

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Even if you were to run down all the bankers, without many of the British public doing some serious moral examination of their own motives, the problems would just continue

I don't want to run them down- I want them to return the money the stole so that it can be used to mitigate some of the pain they caused and to demonstrate that rule of law still means something in this country.

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An angry Jamie Dimon tells World Economic Forum that blanket criticism of banking industry is unfair.

I would advise Dimon to STFU before he activates something more lethal than unfair criticism. If I were a banker in a country with more guns than people then I would ask myself if right now is the time to complain about fairness to the banking classes.

Do these people actually ever go outside? Or watch the news?

Maybe they're counting on the cops whose pension schemes they f*cked to come to their aid?

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I don't want to run them down- I want them to return the money the stole so that it can be used to mitigate some of the pain they caused and to demonstrate that rule of law still means something in this country.

While I sympathise with the sentiment, the reality of what happened won’t match up to your modelling or expectations. The money wasn't exclusively stolen by a tiny clique of bankers; it was systematically stolen by millions of relatively ordinary people, with the result that the economy folded because of the huge theft load. I know this situation feels like all that we have lost was taken away, but in truth much of it has simply been destroyed by our own theft rather than taken away by someone else. We have really done a number on ourselves

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I don't want to run them down- I want them to return the money the stole so that it can be used to mitigate some of the pain they caused and to demonstrate that rule of law still means something in this country.

Unfortunately they can't because they lent it to debt hungry speculators who, in the event, couldn't afford to pay it back.

Of course, they skimmed off a good margin in the process.. but they paid most of that to their share holders and senior managers/directors.

You won't be seeing that back again.. you'll just be paying for the big hole they left behind.

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I would advise Dimon to STFU before he activates something more lethal than unfair criticism. If I were a banker in a country with more guns than people then I would ask myself if right now is the time to complain about fairness to the banking classes.

Do these people actually ever go outside? Or watch the news?

Maybe they're counting on the cops whose pension schemes they f*cked to come to their aid?

Woz that a dig at "a third of the Met pol_ice being in the pay of the Newspapers" - for inside info?

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Even if you were to run down all the bankers, without many of the British public doing some serious moral examination of their own motives, the problems would just continue

I do think English people are examining their motives (can't speak about people outside the south). It's a slow process, and the results will show in how much more debt they're willing to take on.

This is out of necessity, rather than through moral judgement, but I suppose moral influence grows along with poverty.

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While I sympathise with the sentiment, the reality of what happened won’t match up to your modelling or expectations. The money wasn't exclusively stolen by a tiny clique of bankers; it was systematically stolen by millions of relatively ordinary people, with the result that the economy folded because of the huge theft load. I know this situation feels like all that we have lost was taken away, but in truth much of it has simply been destroyed by our own theft rather than taken away by someone else. We have really done a number on ourselves

We gave the banksters the power to create debt- they failed to exercise that power responsibly and chose to mass produce debt to enrich themselves instead- And in the process committed control fraud on an epic scale- I don't think they should be allowed to keep the resulting wealth-it's the outcome of criminal activity and should be forfeit.

I have no illusions that the recovered funds would make a difference to the mess we are in- I just don't want the banksters to keep their loot while all around them other people pay the price for their greed.

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Woz that a dig at "a third of the Met pol_ice being in the pay of the Newspapers" - for inside info?

No- just an observation that people who screw up the lives of millions of their fellow citizens may one day require protection from a minority of those they ruined. And it turns out that amongst those they ruined were the enforcement agents they would seek that protection from. This might not be good thing.

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Even if you were to run down all the bankers, without many of the British public doing some serious moral examination of their own motives, the problems would just continue

Putting the criminal banksters in prison for a long time, ten years plus, and seizing ten times their proven ill gotten gains would I hope, prove to be a big enough deterrent to control frauds that are now becoming apparent.

As you point out, there are frauds and crimes everywhere. Benefit fraud is endemic. MP's were caught with their hands in the till. Public servants have set themselves up pension schemes that will bankrupt the nation, and top judges devised their own pension scheme to let them keep more dosh tax free. This latter one was legal of course, so nice that you can change the law so that what is criminal becomes respectable, for judges only of course, no equality before the law despite your human right to it. Then there are the people driving around uninsured and untaxed, with some if not many committing insurance fraud, and then there are the mortgage fraudsters, and credit card fraudsters.

The only hope that this can be sorted out is if you go after the fraudsters wherever they are. Recent cases where Lords and MP's have gone to jail do show at least that the courts can be a good place to send these people. What we really need though is beefing up of jail sentences, a cell for every offender, and seizing of assets ten times the value of what can be proved in court. Just a few going down for this sort of thing, and being wiped out, will deter so much crime.

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No- just an observation that people who screw up the lives of millions of their fellow citizens may one day require protection from a minority of those they ruined. And it turns out that amongst those they ruined were the enforcement agents they would seek that protection from. This might not be good thing.

Wonderpup,

I thought police pension schemes were run by councils, and guaranteed by council tax payers?

It could be different in the US, where Investment banks were dreaming up frauds to get their hands on the monies built up by state and city pension schemes for their policemen and fireman.

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Wonderpup,

I thought police pension schemes were run by councils, and guaranteed by council tax payers?

It could be different in the US, where Investment banks were dreaming up frauds to get their hands on the monies built up by state and city pension schemes for their policemen and fireman.

I was thinking of the US situation;

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/1dde339c-23a4-11de-996a-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz1CHIVPjyH

The crisis facing pension plans for US state and municipal employees is deepening as investment losses deplete the resources of retirement funds for teachers, police officers, firefighters and other local government workers.

The largest state and municipal pension plans lost 9 per cent of their value in the first two months of this year, according to data from Northern Trust. That followed a loss of 26 per cent in 2008. Smaller funds, which underperform the larger ones, lost more, experts say.

The pension funds, which number 2,600 in total, hold more than $2,000bn after losses last year of close to $1,000bn.

The losses have left retirement plans about 50 per cent funded – that is, they have only half the money needed to cover commitments to 22m current and former workers, experts say. State governments typically put the funding figures closer to 60-70 per cent, although most experts use different calculations.

“There is a massive national underfunding problem,” said Orin Kramer, chairman of the New Jersey pension fund. ”

Unlike company pension plans, state and municipal retirement funds have no federal guarantee fund. This has led to predictions of benefit cuts and possible federal intervention.

“The federal government will get involved, without question,” said Phillip Silitschanu, analyst at Aite Group, a consultancy. “They could provide federal loans, or demand cutbacks as a condition of stimulus money, or there could be a federalisation of some of these pensions.”

Without investment income, funds are liquidating assets at huge losses to pay pensions.

Police pensions are in especially poor shape, in part because states have promised earlier retirement on full pensions, but seldom increased contributions.

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