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Casualty Units Shut To Pay For Private Finance Hospital Contracts

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/8285150/Casualty-units-shut-to-pay-for-private-finance-hospital-contracts.html

Since 2007, more than a fifth of England’s hospital trusts with active PFI hospitals have closed casualty departments, or published proposals to do so. In the same period, only four per cent of trusts without PFI hospitals have closed, or proposed to close, A&E units.

Fewer than a quarter of England’s 168 NHS hospital trusts have significant PFI hospitals in operation. But these trusts account for almost two-thirds of A&E closures or proposed closures.

Health campaigners said there was a “clear connection” between the “inflated” costs of the PFI and the cuts in A&E.

Most trusts insisted there was no connection — not all A&E closures are necessarily done on financial grounds and some are supported by local clinicians.

In recent days, The Daily Telegraph has disclosed how some PFI hospitals – built and operated by the private sector, and effectively rented back to the taxpayer – will end up costing the public purse more than 10 times their capital value.

The new Princess Royal University Hospital in Bromley, south London, cost £118million to build. It will end up costing taxpayers £1.2billion, including facilities management. South London Healthcare, the NHS trust responsible for the Princess Royal, has a second PFI hospital, the Queen Elizabeth in Woolwich.

The trust’s annual deficit was raised to £100million by the two deals. It has closed the A&E unit at one of its non-PFI hospitals, Queen Mary’s in Sidcup.

In internal documents seen by The Daily Telegraph, the trust stated that the “occupation costs” of the PFI hospitals were roughly double those of its non-PFI hospital. A spokesman admitted that its PFI contracts placed “some undeniable restrictions on our flexibility”. But she insisted that the decision to close A&E at Sidcup was “entirely unrelated” to PFI.

Looks like the PFI bad eggs are starting to hatch, the whole idea never made sense apart from a quick political short term boost which allowed vanity projects to be built quickly and it was up to someone else to pick up the cost down the line.

I wonder how long before we see stories about cancer care cut to pay for PFI. It's going to become a political nightmare, luckily none of the politicians that signed all of these deals will ever be held accountable for it all.

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They should create an act of parliament that voids them.

Exactly. Government seems more than happy to use retrospective legislation when it suits them. How about they do it for a good reason for once........

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There is no sub-prime in the UK.

true enough for the PFI.....they will close the country before allowing one loan to default.

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/8285150/Casualty-units-shut-to-pay-for-private-finance-hospital-contracts.html

Looks like the PFI bad eggs are starting to hatch, the whole idea never made sense apart from a quick political short term boost which allowed vanity projects to be built quickly and it was up to someone else to pick up the cost down the line.

I wonder how long before we see stories about cancer care cut to pay for PFI. It's going to become a political nightmare, luckily none of the politicians that signed all of these deals will ever be held accountable for it all.

A lot of these closures have come from clinical pressures, not financial ones.

The 'Making it Better' programme was introduced to try and provide better levels of care for sick children, high risk births, and neonatal care. They argued, in the original report, that having rarer diseases/conditions, 'experts', and resources spread thinly across a lot of hospitals was putting lives at risk, and that it would be better to form 'centres of excellence' for each region.

The result being that those hospitals stripped of their childrens' ward were then no longer able to offer A&E to children. Downgrading of maternity units to 'low risk only' has meant little Obsetrics work, which because OBS consultants usually do the Gynae work, has meant the Gynae work often went with them. Without facilities to admit children and Gynae cases that come in through A&E, the natural knock-on is downgrading A&E to 'minor injuries'

I'm not saying I agree with it, but I was heavily involved in the consultation process for one of the regions.

I believe there has been similar restructuring for cancer treatment too.

Of course all this restructuring has meant the nominated 'centres of excellence' have undergone a lot of construction work, usually on PFI.

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They should publicise a list of the scumbags responsible for signing off on these deals at least.

List of scumbags responsible for signing off on these deals:

  1. James Gordon Brown

The end

Edited by Goat

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List of scumbags responsible for signing off on these deals:

  1. James Gordon Brown

The end

For once I don't think the list should end there. There are some overpaid clinical governance staff to blame here.

These twunts have lined their own pockets whilst expensively trying to 'design out' medical negligence.

They will, of course, have voted for the aforementioned scumbag, and convinced him that all the extra NHS funds he threw at them would be going towards improvements in patient care.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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