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Graduate Unemployment Hits 15 Year High

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/8283862/Graduate-unemployment-hits-15-year-high.html

Official figures published today showed 20 per cent of ex-students were without work in the third quarter of 2010 – double the number when the recession started.

In a fresh blow to the economic recovery, it also emerged that graduate unemployment increased faster than the jobless rate among the UK as a whole.

The disclosure – in data from the Office for National Statistics – comes just a week after figures suggested more than 45 students would be applying for each graduate job in 2011.

It will be seen as the latest set back to the Government's plans to put the public finances back on a stable footing.

On Tuesday it was revealed that the economy shrunk by 0.5 per cent during the final three months of last year, with the Coalition blaming the freezing weather that paralysed much of the country in December.

So fees going up and you only have a 80% chance of finding a job now with what will soon be a minimum of £30k debt.

If this was the situation when I attended their is no way I would have gone. It's not worth taking on the debt, it's becoming a huge gamble which there is becoming an ever greater pool of losers.

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/8283862/Graduate-unemployment-hits-15-year-high.html

So fees going up and you only have a 80% chance of finding a job now with what will soon be a minimum of £30k debt.

If this was the situation when I attended their is no way I would have gone. It's not worth taking on the debt, it's becoming a huge gamble which there is becoming an ever greater pool of losers.

Except ONE thing, entry requirements for emmigration.... higher education scores lots of points! Heh even rubbish ESL gigs require degrees to get visas. And they tend to check now as well!

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I wonder out of the 80% who have got jobs how many have got jobs that people used to get when they left school at 16 ?

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given the calibre of many graduates these days I am not surprised.

Particularly if they are turning up their noses as non graduate jobs because they have a degree in management studies.

People need more humility, if the only job available is flipping burgers - take the damn job until something better comes along.

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given the calibre of many graduates these days I am not surprised.

Particularly if they are turning up their noses as non graduate jobs because they have a degree in management studies.

I'm sure those with that luxury probably live off the bank of Mum and Dad anyway.

People need more humility, if the only job available is flipping burgers - take the damn job until something better comes along.

The lowered demand for labour isn't their fault. I do agree that sitting around doing nothing is stupid, at the very least take part in voluntary work or something...

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The lowered demand for labour isn't their fault. I do agree that sitting around doing nothing is stupid, at the very least take part in voluntary work or something...

I'm not saying it's their fault - it isn't. but don't just stand there feeling sorry for yourself. Do odd jobs, knock on doors, work as an office gopher, anything.

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I'm not saying it's their fault - it isn't. but don't just stand there feeling sorry for yourself. Do odd jobs, knock on doors, work as an office gopher, anything.

Hence the rest of my post.

It's also interesting that further down the article:

Figures also showed that nearly half of 16 to 17-year-old school leavers who were ready for work in the third quarter of 2010 were unable to find a job.

Clearly experience is a large factor as I thought...their relative cheapness isn't helping them get jobs, at any rate.

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Hence the rest of my post.

true
Clearly experience is a large factor as I thought...their relative cheapness isn't helping them get jobs, at any rate.

With (min wage + National insurance + corp tax) where it is - someone who can't do sums or read and write properly isn't that cheap any more.

Never mind they can get an apprenticeship.

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With (min wage + National insurance + corp tax) where it is - someone who can't do sums or read and write properly isn't that cheap any more.

Min wage for 16 year olds is £3.30, IIRC. Saving 44% on the wage bill per person is a big deal, I'd have thought.

Never mind they can get an apprenticeship.

Which of course, are virtually non-existent.

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I wonder out of the 80% who have got jobs how many have got jobs that people used to get when they left school at 16 ?

Indeed. Graduate unemployment is 20%. Graduate underemployment will be closer to 50%.

As a social democratic leaning citizen approaching middle age I think this is an appalling situation for new graduates. I graduated in 1995 and for a while I said "It's not as bad as when I graduated".

That's just not the case now. It is worse.

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I'm not saying it's their fault - it isn't. but don't just stand there feeling sorry for yourself. Do odd jobs, knock on doors, work as an office gopher, anything.

I think it's been pointed out here before that those mythical 'shelf stacker' jobs are not as easy to get as some imagine. The irony being that you are in competition with people who are far more 'qualified' for these roles- in the minds of employers at least- they want people who will stick around, not some graduate who will clearly be ready to jump ship at a moments notice when (if) something more serious comes along.

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Yup, whenever we advertise for someone in our office, we get a lot of graduates applying.

However they never even get an interview because you know they're not going to stick it, and even if they do it's not where they want to be!

I feel sorry for them, but you've got to remember a lot of these 20% who are unemployed are the ones that didn't get the grades, I'd be interested to know what % of graduates are working low paid jobs.

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I technically graduated (I owe about £1.2k before I can collect the certificate), after I took on minimum wage factory work and put plenty of hours in, jacked it in when the hours dropped as the dole paid more and have recently secured employment again, it in't very secure and is minimum wage, but its about £30 a week better than dole and other benefits.

Ideally I need to go back an do a masters before progressing. The results of my degree make for very interesting reading. A few bouts of homelessness and some other things that happened to me whilst studying adversely affected my grades. Most of my modules were passed with 1st rate marks, but those few coinciding with my homelessness and what not were bare passes and brought my overall grade down.

-Even if I show and explain that to a prospective employer they are going to pass me over for someone else (I would probably do the same)

Working now anyway, even if it isn't that good a job.

I had recently been on a training course for unemployed before getting a job, quite a few other graduates were on it, 80% of the people there were under 25, and perhaps 20% of those under 25 on it had a degree! Out of 40 people, 2 were female, 18 and 19, one never worked and one was made redundant. The older people on the course had all been made redundant.

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I technically graduated (I owe about £1.2k before I can collect the certificate), after I took on minimum wage factory work and put plenty of hours in, jacked it in when the hours dropped as the dole paid more and have recently secured employment again, it in't very secure and is minimum wage, but its about £30 a week better than dole and other benefits.

Ideally I need to go back an do a masters before progressing. The results of my degree make for very interesting reading. A few bouts of homelessness and some other things that happened to me whilst studying adversely affected my grades. Most of my modules were passed with 1st rate marks, but those few coinciding with my homelessness and what not were bare passes and brought my overall grade down.

-Even if I show and explain that to a prospective employer they are going to pass me over for someone else (I would probably do the same)

Working now anyway, even if it isn't that good a job.

I had recently been on a training course for unemployed before getting a job, quite a few other graduates were on it, 80% of the people there were under 25, and perhaps 20% of those under 25 on it had a degree! Out of 40 people, 2 were female, 18 and 19, one never worked and one was made redundant. The older people on the course had all been made redundant.

If its any consolation, you are in good company. Years back I thought I was the only graduate in the world attending courses for the unemployed. Everyone's jaws dropped when I said I'd been to University. They thought I must have been thrown out or something.

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Having a degree only gives you the theory so to speak, I've seen plenty of CV's from graduates in the past when I've flirted with the idea of expansion, but there isnt the experience with graduates.

What kind of experience are you looking for?

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Indeed. Graduate unemployment is 20%. Graduate underemployment will be closer to 50%.

As a social democratic leaning citizen approaching middle age I think this is an appalling situation for new graduates. I graduated in 1995 and for a while I said "It's not as bad as when I graduated".

That's just not the case now. It is worse.

You picked the wrong time to finish college! :unsure:

It was picking up in 1995. In 1997 you would probably walked straight into a job in a major company, as a friend of mine did!

I can assure you that the early to mid eighties were pretty bad too!

Edited by MrPin

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/8283862/Graduate-unemployment-hits-15-year-high.html

So fees going up and you only have a 80% chance of finding a job now with what will soon be a minimum of £30k debt.

If this was the situation when I attended their is no way I would have gone. It's not worth taking on the debt, it's becoming a huge gamble which there is becoming an ever greater pool of losers.

And by subjects... (few months old data)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-11652845

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I'd expect graduate unemployment to trend higher as ever more students graduate.

In fact it should trend towards the whole-population average. So if the startingpoint is that once upon a time graduates were an elite and graduate unemployment was low, it has only one way to go.

Figures probably cushioned by a non-jobs bubble in the last few years.

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Official figures published today showed 20 per cent of ex-students were without work in the third quarter of 2010 – double the number when the recession started.

Did anyone see the BBC anti govt newsreader who didnt like the response from her interviewee?

He stated that the number of unemployed jobless hasnt doubled, all that has happened is this survey was taken at a different time of year to the original survey - the one that stated about 9% of graduates were unemeployed.

He went on to say that roughly 20% of students concentrate on studies (ahem and some drinking) and only start to look for a job upon graduating...... and that it is entirely consistent with previous years experience that some students want to take a summer off before looking for a job etc etc. 20% is the norm at the time of year the latest survey was taken.

Po faced harridan was somewhat flustered that her interviewee didnt want to twist the report and help her bash the condems and spluttered.... "Are you saying the -0.5% gtrowth figures are wrong?"

PS - he went on to say the problem is not Graduates finding jobs, but those youngsters with anything less than a degree - the kids with A levels, GCSE's or no quals at all are the ones struggling. The BBC harridan hadnt been programmed to ask questions that would lay the blame for this fairly and squarely at the feet of the condems so moved on.

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