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Dave Beans

China To Create Largest Mega City In The World With 42 Million People

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Quite impressive really...in only 6 years!

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/8278315/China-to-create-largest-mega-city-in-the-world-with-42-million-people.html

China-Super-City_1810271b.jpg

City planners in south China have laid out an ambitious plan to merge together the nine cities that lie around the Pearl River Delta. The "Turn The Pearl River Delta Into One" scheme will create a 16,000 sq mile urban area that is 26 times larger geographically than Greater London, or twice the size of Wales.

The new mega-city will cover a large part of China's manufacturing heartland, stretching from Guangzhou to Shenzhen and including Foshan, Dongguan, Zhongshan, Zhuhai, Jiangmen, Huizhou and Zhaoqing. Together, they account for nearly a tenth of the Chinese economy.

Over the next six years, around 150 major infrastructure projects will mesh the transport, energy, water and telecommunications networks of the nine cities together, at a cost of some 2 trillion yuan (£190 billion). An express rail line will also connect the hub with nearby Hong Kong.

"The idea is that when the cities are integrated, the residents can travel around freely and use the health care and other facilities in the different areas," said Ma Xiangming, the chief planner at the Guangdong Rural and Urban Planning Institute and a senior consultant on the project.

However, he said no name had been chosen for the area. "It will not be like Greater London or Greater Tokyo because there is no one city at the heart of this megalopolis," he said. "We cannot just name it after one of the existing cities."

"It will help spread industry and jobs more evenly across the region and public services will also be distributed more fairly," he added.

Mr Ma said that residents would be able to use universal rail cards and buy annual tickets to allow them to commute around the mega-city. Twenty-nine rail lines, totalling 3,100 miles, will be added, cutting rail journeys around the urban area to a maximum of one hour between different city centres. According to planners, phone bills could also fall by 85 per cent and hospitals and schools will be improved.

"Residents will be able to choose where to get their services and will use the internet to find out which hospital, for example, is less busy," said Mr Ma.

Pollution, a key problem in the Pearl River Delta because of its industrialisation, will also be addressed with a united policy, and the price of petrol and electricity could also be unified.

The southern conglomeration is intended to wrestle back a competitive advantage from the growing urban areas around Beijing and Shanghai.

By the end of the decade, China plans to move ever greater numbers into its cities, creating some city zones with 50 million to 100 million people and "small" city clusters of 10 million to 25 million.

In the north, the area around Beijing and Tianjin, two of China's most important cities, is being ringed with a network of high-speed railways that will create a super-urban area known as the Bohai Economic Rim. Its population could be as high as 260 million.

The process of merging the Bohai region has already begun with the connection of Beijing to Tianjing by a high speed railway that completes the 75 mile journey in less than half an hour, providing an axis around which to create a network of feeder cities.

As the process gathers pace, total investment in urban infrastructure over the next five years is expected to hit £685 billion, according to an estimate by the British Chamber of Commerce, with an additional £300 billion spend on high speed rail and £70 billion on urban transport.

Edited by Dave Beans

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/8278315/China-to-create-largest-mega-city-in-the-world-with-42-million-people.html

City planners in south China have laid out an ambitious plan to merge together the nine cities that lie around the Pearl River Delta.

The "Turn The Pearl River Delta Into One" scheme will create a 16,000 sq mile urban area that is 26 times larger geographically than Greater London, or twice the size of Wales.

The new mega-city will cover a large part of China's manufacturing heartland, stretching from Guangzhou to Shenzhen and including Foshan, Dongguan, Zhongshan, Zhuhai, Jiangmen, Huizhou and Zhaoqing. Together, they account for nearly a tenth of the Chinese economy.

Over the next six years, around 150 major infrastructure projects will mesh the transport, energy, water and telecommunications networks of the nine cities together, at a cost of some 2 trillion yuan (£190 billion). An express rail line will also connect the hub with nearby Hong Kong.

"The idea is that when the cities are integrated, the residents can travel around freely and use the health care and other facilities in the different areas," said Ma Xiangming, the chief planner at the Guangdong Rural and Urban Planning Institute and a senior consultant on the project.

I wonder if this will turn out how the City planners imagine, worldwide these types of grand schemes also seem to come short of what's promised.

It will certainly create a lot of work in the area over the coming years. No idle hands here for awhile.

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"Off plan" condos with a view of the smog are available at Yuan 45,000,000. BTLers must be getting in quick despite the prospect of over-supply.

42 million investors will generate some serious cash. Lovely vision isn't it: 42m people living in a single city choked with pollution all busy making shite to export to the rest of the world who may one day just stop buyuing from them.

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slightly misrepresented i think.

the 42 million already live there.

all theyre going to do is create a massive infrastructure project to link the current cities together.

thats the difference with the new economies of china india brazil.

becuase they are starting from scratch they can build better infrastructure than we can, with the latest technology.

our rail lines are old and creaking, other countries are building the latest and newest.

to compete we need to modernise our whole system instead of just always trying to "get by"

Edited by mfp123

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"Off plan" condos with a view of the smog are available at Yuan 45,000,000. BTLers must be getting in quick despite the prospect of over-supply.

42 million investors will generate some serious cash. Lovely vision isn't it: 42m people living in a single city choked with pollution all busy making shite to export to the rest of the world who may one day just stop buyuing from them.

Not quite the American Dream, turned nightmare, this starts out a nightmare :lol:

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slightly misrepresented i think.

the 42 million already live there.

all theyre going to do is create a massive infrastructure project to link the current cities together.

thats the difference with the new economies of china india brazil.

becuase they are starting from scratch they can build better infrastructure than we can, with the latest technology.

our rail lines are old and creaking, other countries are building the latest and newest.

to compete we need to modernise our whole system instead of just always trying to "get by"

to what end?

so I can get my pizza delivered in 5 minutes rather than 10?

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to what end?

so I can get my pizza delivered in 5 minutes rather than 10?

multiply that by 30 million journeys a day, and you have a more efficient economy.

its also about quality of life. isnt that what we earn money for in the first place.

at the end of the day, investment in infrastructure is simply recycling money, or reallocating resources, but it creates something we actually need.

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I don't know why we bother with SI units of measurement. We're all happier with:

Very small distances measured in fractions of a hair's width

Very large distances measured in times around the world or to the moon and back.

Moderate areas measured in multiples of a football pitch and large areas measured in multiples of the size of Wales

Mass measured in multiples of bags of sugar.

There are probably more, but I can't think of them right now.

Y

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multiply that by 30 million journeys a day, and you have a more efficient economy.

its also about quality of life. isnt that what we earn money for in the first place.

at the end of the day, investment in infrastructure is simply recycling money, or reallocating resources, but it creates something we actually need.

Time is there to be spent, not saved. Give me a pleasant and interesting but old and creaky system any day over a frantic, rushed, dull, and efficient one. Comfortable journeys are preferable to quick ones. Why are there so many people who'd want to live in those parts of the country that offer quiet, attractive surroundings at the expense of being able to get everything quickly and conveniently?

Our problem is that we've done a good job of making our system neither comfortable nor quick. Train-wise investment directed at it being pleasanter and cheaper is something I'd find far more appealing than making it quicker, and would do more for quality of life. Faster would just be used to try to cram even more in, which isn't what we need.

Edit: with some exceptions, e.g. building a new road so you're not stuck in that same **** traffic jam every day.

Edited by Riedquat

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Every vision I see of the future is hideous. Technological no man's land based on the Utopian Dream set out in 1984.

That old classic with Jennifer "Jenny" Agutter (name escapes me but its been on Tle recently) sees such utopian nightmares as being destroyed for a return to nature sort of theme.

I can't imagine anything much worse than a Chinese communist city of 42 million "living" for the greater glory of the People (the party bosses).

Kin nightmare IMO.

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multiply that by 30 million journeys a day, and you have a more efficient economy.

its also about quality of life. isnt that what we earn money for in the first place.

at the end of the day, investment in infrastructure is simply recycling money, or reallocating resources, but it creates something we actually need.

Ok, so less energy is used or wasted...maybe the pizza boy is able to earn and extra couple of bob...while the energy company disposes of staff it no longer needs.

The end result is that no-one has to work, as the machines we make are 100% efficient and provide our needs....then...what use are we?

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Every vision I see of the future is hideous. Technological no man's land based on the Utopian Dream set out in 1984.

That old classic with Jennifer "Jenny" Agutter (name escapes me but its been on Tle recently) sees such utopian nightmares as being destroyed for a return to nature sort of theme.

I can't imagine anything much worse than a Chinese communist city of 42 million "living" for the greater glory of the People (the party bosses).

Kin nightmare IMO.

Logans Run....or Logans Hun (honey) as Jenny was the naked nymph.

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Logans Run....or Logans Hun (honey) as Jenny was the naked nymph.

Ah yes! Hmm, seems to me that Jenny Agutter, Helen Bonham-Carter and Kate Winslet all have one thing in common--they are drawless in every film they have made.

Shameful really. :(

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I remember seeing this a few years ago...apparently they wanted to "remodel" Barnsley to reflect a "Tuscan Hill Village" :blink: I knew that there would have to be an Alsop involved somewhere....

1.jpg

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/4187409.stm

A vision of a northern England in which people could live in Hull, commute to Liverpool, shop in Leeds and go out in Manchester in one day has gone on show.

Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott mooted the idea of a "super city" stretching from coast to coast along the M62 in February 2004.

Architect Will Alsop has now unveiled his idea of how the 80-mile long, 15-mile wide conurbation would look.

It will be on display at Urbis, in Manchester, until May.

Mr Alsop's vision includes innovative solutions to urban sprawl such as extending Liverpool into the sea by erecting buildings on stilts up to a mile from the coast.

He also proposes transforming the South Yorkshire town of Barnsley by modelling it on a Tuscan hill village, complete with its own walls.

Other ideas, such as Stack - a vertical "village" where 5,000 people can live, work, worship and play - offers a twist on the skyscraper solution to population increase.

Mr Prescott has said he sees a northern super city as a potential rival to London's economic power and size.

'Civic pride'

Nicknamed "Prezzagrad", it would be similar to the USA's heavily populated east coast which stretches from Boston through New York to Washington.

Mr Alsop insists that local identity would not be lost in such a megalopolis.

"I will have totally failed if it was homogenised all across the country," he said.

"The whole point of this is to celebrate individuality and uniqueness. More than anything else, people want a return to civic pride."

He added: "I'm fascinated by the way people live their lives and how we might want to live in the future.

"The spaces we create to work, rest and play are critical to this as are the methods we use to travel, shop and develop our agricultural environment.

"Super city aims to break down conventional barriers to thought by constantly asking 'what if?', and then converts these thoughts and visions into tangible realities which I hope will intrigue and inspire visitors in equal measure."

But not everybody thinks the idea of a massive conurbation stretching from Hull to Liverpool across the Pennines is a good one.

Nigel Spriggins, a lecturer in housing at Salford University, said: "I think it fills a lot of people with dread.

"I'm not an architectural historian but I think a lot of these ideas are quite similar to the ideas that [swiss architect] Le Corbusier had fairly early on in the 20th century and they never really caught on because I don't think people actually wanted them.

"We haven't got the resources to build a tram line out to Ashton, for example, so the proposal that we have a massive multi-lane motorway crossing the Pennines and building loads of houses off that that... there just isn't the funding or the will to put that kind of structure in place."

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Ok, so less energy is used or wasted...maybe the pizza boy is able to earn and extra couple of bob...while the energy company disposes of staff it no longer needs.

The end result is that no-one has to work, as the machines we make are 100% efficient and provide our needs....then...what use are we?

honestly, i think there will be a point in mankind when machines do most of the work we need to do, and we actually spend most of our time on things like science, research, technology, and arts rather than spend our lives trying to get things.

we work in order to get by, survive, get the things we want, but if machines allow us to do all those things without toiling 40 hours a week, we can focus on other things. theres no rules to humanity that life is all about working.

Edited by mfp123

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That old classic with Jennifer "Jenny" Agutter (name escapes me but its been on Tle recently) sees such utopian nightmares as being destroyed for a return to nature sort of theme.

Logan's Run. A hedonistic world of superfast "Maze cars", teleporting bed mates and sentient computers. There's only one catch.

No fuses.

Seriously, look at the last 10 minutes of the film. Clearly the domed city was constructed to even lower building code standards than the flippin' Towering Inferno.

Also one critic pointed out that old age is, in part, a product of our technological society. Logan and his pals may be hard pressed to live past 30 living wild with no skills or training.

I remember seeing this a few years ago...apparently they wanted to "remodel" Barnsley to reflect a "Tuscan Hill Village"

You're a very naughty man. You nearly made me choke on my coffee.

Mr Alsop's vision includes innovative solutions to urban sprawl such as extending Liverpool into the sea

That's a bit hard on Liverpudlians surely.

He also proposes transforming the South Yorkshire town of Barnsley by modelling it on a Tuscan hill village, complete with its own walls.

Now that I agree with. Well, at least the walls part.

Stack - a vertical "village" where 5,000 people can live, work, worship and play

Hmmm..., I think we've tried that before.

389297315_6fb0308c22.jpg

"Prezzagrad", I ask you. Someone should give Fatty Two Jags a copy of The Long Emergency. His half-baked ideas run contrary to the way communities need to be designed to cope with a future without super abundant access to oil.

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"Off plan" condos with a view of the smog are available at Yuan 45,000,000. BTLers must be getting in quick despite the prospect of over-supply.

42 million investors will generate some serious cash. Lovely vision isn't it: 42m people living in a single city choked with pollution all busy making shite to export to the rest of the world who may one day just stop buyuing from them.

On the positive size, it'll only take a couple of large nukes to clean up the whole conurbation.

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honestly, i think there will be a point in mankind when machines do most of the work we need to do, and we actually spend most of our time on things like science, research, technology, and arts rather than spend our lives trying to get things.

we work in order to get by, survive, get the things we want, but if machines allow us to do all those things without toiling 40 hours a week, we can focus on other things. theres no rules to humanity that life is all about working.

Utopia is a nice place isn't it.

What will happen is that the small amount of work that needs to be done and the wealth deriving from it will be concentrated in a few greedy hands and the 6 billion surplus to requirements will be living in corrugated iron and cardboard shanty towns centred on the local landfill.

Edited by Tiger Woods?

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Utopia is a nice place isn't it.

What will happen is that the small amount of work that needs to be done and the wealth deriving from it will be concentrated in a few greedy hands and the 6 billion surplus to requirements will be living in corrugated iron and carboard shanty towns centred on the local landfill.

You are describing 1960s and 1970s Hong Kong, In the 1980s the HKG government with the blessing of the PRC demolished all of those shanty towns and relocated them into gigantic housing estates in the North of HK near the borders, you have massive Y shaped apartment blocks which are quite nice (they are council homes). These places can cram in 1200 familes and take up little ground space.

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honestly, i think there will be a point in mankind when machines do most of the work we need to do, and we actually spend most of our time on things like science, research, technology, and arts rather than spend our lives trying to get things.

we work in order to get by, survive, get the things we want, but if machines allow us to do all those things without toiling 40 hours a week, we can focus on other things. theres no rules to humanity that life is all about working.

:lol:

i love your optimism.

it could so easily happen in a lot of jobs already,but it doesn't and then people moan about wasters (some are, others are just efficient with the resources they have and improve themselves, but still have to fill the X hour week (probably spend the slack on here rather than enriching their employer/the state)

what you want to do with the 90% dunce population in the science, research, technology, and arts is anyone's guess. especially that last one, seeing as what it has become.

the do'ers willingly and proactively supporting corro/x-factor anyone?

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honestly, i think there will be a point in mankind when machines do most of the work we need to do, and we actually spend most of our time on things like science, research, technology, and arts rather than spend our lives trying to get things.

we work in order to get by, survive, get the things we want, but if machines allow us to do all those things without toiling 40 hours a week, we can focus on other things. theres no rules to humanity that life is all about working.

Chinese people do not get on with technology so well though. They like it up to a point but after that nope nada not going to adopt it.

For example I have never ever seen a chinese person use a dishwasher, my dad has one, when he fitted a new kitchen, it still has the trial box of washing tabs in it. He sees no point like myself when hand washing is faster.

Self service checkouts? Nope bosses in China of supermarkets are so paranoid they won't allow this EVER.

Bin lorries, just like they were 50 years ago in the UK, hand loaded.

Just looking at Japan/China/Taiwan/Korea you know it is different not just based on wealth either. The Japanese and Taiwanese have mini combine harvesters. Chinese people in HK in the fields in front of my dad's house do not use machines they use people to harvest the crops.

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