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Prefab Homes 'could Solve Uk Housing Crisis'

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/constructionandproperty/8279552/Prefab-homes-could-solve-UK-housing-crisis.html

The cheap housing method, whereby homes are built off-site and dropped into place, is once again the future of building, according to an independent report commissioned by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

Pre-fabs got a bad name for shoddy design and poor construction after they were churned out by the thousands to solve the post-war housing crisis.

But while today’s versions - dubbed “modular” homes - are still low-cost, with prices starting at £20,000, they boast state-of-the-art design and impressive "green" credentials.

Researchers believe this type of housing could offer a cheap and easy way of tackling the UK’s housing "deficit" - the 80,000 too few homes built each year to meet the need for affordable housing.

Chris Goodier, of Loughborough University, who co-wrote the paper, said: “Many major mortgage providers are already willing to lend against these structures, which has been a problem in the past, meaning that first-time buyers could find them a highly practical way of getting onto the property ladder.”

The report suggests building homes from recycled plastic that would otherwise be lost as landfill.

The article doesn't say much, but the comments below re. land prices driving property prices and the solution being a land tax are spot on.

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The crisis is not a shortage of supply but price. People simply cannot afford to buy and banks can't afford to lend on 7-10 X multiples anymore.

When supply builds up as jobs are lost and IR rise prices will drop. As indeed they are. Looked on RM this mornin' and found 73 properties for sale within just a mile of a PC I selected (£200-£250 rnage).

Then there will soon be lots of happy campers on here.

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The crisis is not a shortage of supply but price. People simply cannot afford to buy and banks can't afford to lend on 7-10 X multiples anymore.

When supply builds up as jobs are lost and IR rise prices will drop. As indeed they are. Looked on RM this mornin' and found 73 properties for sale within just a mile of a PC I selected (£200-£250 rnage).

Then there will soon be lots of happy campers on here.

But isnt even £200K an outrageous amount of money for a house, depending on how big etc?

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But isnt even £200K an outrageous amount of money for a house, depending on how big etc?

The sum of money is irrelevant in itself. If the cost of servicing the debt becomes more than you can pay, then the bank restricts credit to get everyone back into the game.

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My Auntie lived in a Prefab. I really liked it.

There are many cases where prefabs were so well made, people wouldnt change them, knowing the chances were that they would end up with something far worse. Many lasted for decades, I bet that there are still a few around that are still being used that were built just after the war.

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Getting rid of the monarchy and their permanent grip on ALL of the land would solve UK housing crisis.

That would only mean that somebody else ends up with a permanent grip on it instead. A land tax would simply reduce the incentive for anyone to have a permanent grip on it.

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That would only mean that somebody else ends up with a permanent grip on it instead. A land tax would simply reduce the incentive for anyone to have a permanent grip on it.

Hence why we live in the world we do, when people like you are asking for more taxes.

There are plenty of other way to bring parity to this nation. Taxation is definitely not one of them.

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Lots of houses are partially pre-fabricated already. Roof trusses, or the framework for timber-framed houses. But most people want to live in a house that's got brick or stone external walls and a tiled roof. Also many of the tower blocks built in the 1960's and 1970's were made from kits fo pre-cast concrete sections and prefabricated infill panels and glazing.

Mobile, or 'park' homes are fully or partially pre-fabricated, and there's a niche for them, but I don't think we're any nearer to pre-fabs becoming mainstream than we've been at any time since the war.

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Hence why we live in the world we do, when people like you are asking for more taxes.

There are plenty of other way to bring parity to this nation. Taxation is definitely not one of them.

I call for them, but overall I want less taxation.

What we are talking about here is a shifting of the burden of tax, from that placed on labour and product purchases, to that which comes with the ownership of land.

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I was flicking through a book called Micro - Very Small Buildings the other day and were some great designs in there.

The best designs could be throughly tested, and updated as required, and then the best ones mass produced.

Imagine a 'street' of these as beach homes instead of the horrors we have littering the coast. People would love them.

Lucky-Drops-is-a-LanternLike-Japanese-Micro-Home_0.jpg

Edited by Constable

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Lots of houses are partially pre-fabricated already. Roof trusses, or the framework for timber-framed houses. But most people want to live in a house that's got brick or stone external walls and a tiled roof. Also many of the tower blocks built in the 1960's and 1970's were made from kits fo pre-cast concrete sections and prefabricated infill panels and glazing.

Mobile, or 'park' homes are fully or partially pre-fabricated, and there's a niche for them, but I don't think we're any nearer to pre-fabs becoming mainstream than we've been at any time since the war.

Yes. Isnt the problem with housing really related to the proportion of the cost that comes with the land. I dont think that the cost of the bricks and mortar on top the land is a very large percentage of the overall price that you would pay for a home. Making that thing on the land cheaper is a help, but not a dagger to the heart of high housing costs.

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These 30k figures don't include the land cost though, right?

How much would it cost me to buy a patch of land in the suburbs, buy a prefab, sort out the foundation etc, and erect it on my bit of land?

I doubt its much cheaper.

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Hence why we live in the world we do, when people like you are asking for more taxes.

There are plenty of other way to bring parity to this nation. Taxation is definitely not one of them.

Maybe the blame lies with people who can't understand that asking for a different tax is not the same as asking for more tax :rolleyes:

If you tax land then you have scope to reduce income tax for example. If you're going to tax something then shouldn't we tax wealth rather than work?

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There isn't a crisis of housing.

Population growth in the UK is currently 0.7% PA (445k), but from 1974 to 1984 it hovered around the 0% mark and was under 0.35% until 2004 (200k PA). The 7% figure is a recent number and IMHO will subside as europe levels out.

http://www.google.co...pulation+growth

Housing stock , Since WW2 we have been building property between the 100->200k PA

graph1_tcm119-23655.jpg

Pretty much since WW2 we have built one house for every person born/immigrant, Since 2004 we have built 1 property for every two new people, we currently have more housing per head than at any time in history. We havent built as much as spain/ireland (where if you had extrapolated the building rate for another 10 years you would have had more property than people), BUT at boom/Post WW2 rates in the UK you would have eventually end up with one property per person. We have enough property in the UK, as long as you dont mind living with one other person.

Several things make property expensive, 1. Fear due to the the pension crisis, everyone put money into property after the stock market crashes all this extra money goes into BTL and holiday homes 2. Property Tax Breaks 3. Lack of land due to planning restrictions which has stopped too much property being built and has stopped a mega crash (and the excessive supply problem which was part of the first housing crash, which was made worse by the MIRAS fiasco)...

Im still with spline his predictions have been spot on so far since 2007, predicting the crash, the levelling off and the recovery all before they happened!. we are going to see levelish prices

http://www.housepric...rice_predictor/

Edited by AteMoose

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the point is missed here, the cost of building a house is not the problem. The problem is the price of the land, pre-fab won't solve this, especially if - as I suspect - it end up being sold for not much less than a normal built...

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Pretty much since WW2 we have built one house for every person born/immigrant, Since 2004 we have built 1 property for every two new people, we currently have more housing per head than at any time in history.

I broadly agree with that, but to get the full picture you need to consider how many houses have been knocked down during the same period. There was a period of replacing a lot of Victorian housing, and now it's getting popular to replace 60s housing.

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My Auntie lived in a Prefab. I really liked it.

So a leasehold landsite with a house? designed to rot within 30-40 yrs - with nothing left to pass on or show for a lifetimes drudgery to pay for it (including interest by usury).

The greedy bastards must be salivating at the outrageous thought of it!

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I broadly agree with that, but to get the full picture you need to consider how many houses have been knocked down during the same period. There was a period of replacing a lot of Victorian housing, and now it's getting popular to replace 60s housing.

In my area, a housing association is their replacing 60's housing stock...they're managing to get least an extra third to double the amount of new housing on the same plots...either they were overly generous in their gardens back then, or modern housing is much smaller...or perhaps a bit of both...

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In my area, a housing association is their replacing 60's housing stock...they're managing to get least an extra third to double the amount of new housing on the same plots...either they were overly generous in their gardens back then, or modern housing is much smaller...or perhaps a bit of both...

It was law up till 1972 that a house had to be a set minimum sq ft, on a set minimum plot of land sq ft and except inner city, come with a garage.

Edited by erranta

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      • down 5% +
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