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Gov Will Spend £400K To Destroy Id Card Data

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Putting aside the civil liberties issues, this is a VERY SMALL price to pay to save us all from the insane BILLIONS the full scheme would have likely ended up costing us. Frankly I am surprised that this scheme, unlike the other poisoned chalices that Labour left for the present government to remain committed to or having to spend vast amounts to get out of, has cost so little to get out of.

For any die-hard Labour voters hanging out here I take full pleasure in rubbing in your stubborn faces the fact that I, and pleasantly surprisingly many of my circle of friends and family of whom many were previously Labourites, ranked their opposition to the ID scheme as one of the top three reasons for NOT voting Labour. Talking to a number of Labour activists, since the election, on a few occassions I am surprised by how much they simply cannot grasp how many votes they lost because of this single issue alone.

Edited by anonguest

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Give me the hard drives and a hammer, I'll do it for half that :lol:.

Or they could download a simple file shredder for free. What exactly is going to cost £400K?

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Perhaps it could all be buried under the Millenium Dome? :huh:

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yup, this cost is ballmunch.

i hereby offer to undercut the previous poster, i will do the whole job for 100k, and i wont need a hammer.

actually just to avoid the upcoming bidding war, i will do the whole job for free.... just for the satisfaction

serious offer

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The cost of destroying the personal data collected under the ill-starred programme will be a mere £400,000, Home Office minister Damian Green revealed yesterday.

Another prime example of public sector waste :angry:

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Wait until they find out that the US government appears increasingly nervous about the integrity of its RFID enabled e-passports, secure access cards and 'contactless' electronic banking. (£400K will seem like peanuts.)

“…2.5 million radio frequency shielding sleeves (were delivered) to the US Department of Defense to protect the contactless Common Access Card (CAC) from data interception. An option to purchase an additional 1,675,000 sleeves was exercised by the Defense Department for final delivery in January 2011. This order will bring the total number of our sleeves 4.2 million."

Source: www.contactless.wordpress.com

For more information on the 'anti-skimming' protective RFID shielding sleeves themselves you could try: www.rfidprotect.co.uk

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Or they could download a simple file shredder for free. What exactly is going to cost £400K?

There are set standards for the 'quality' of data destruction. At all points, a full audit trail, or every server and every hard drive must be maintained. Typically, good practice would call for an observer (not participating in the destruction process) to witness the destruction and sign-off on the audit record that it has been performed, as well as an audit trail showing the destruction equipment was tested to be in full working order before and after the destruction process. Records will have to be audited to ensure that all backup copies are identified, as well as any data samples used for testing purposes, or statistical analysis. These extra copies all need to be traced, retrieved and destroyed in a similar manner.

If the data has been sent to an offsite datacentre as a secure backup, then the procedure will need to be repeated at the 2nd site.

This generates considerable bureaucracy, but it does virtually guarantee that the data destroyed without risk of leak.

Further, there are several grades of 'data destruction'.

Level 1 - (Suitable for low-security data - e.g. limited personal data on a single person). This requires that the hard drives be shredded so that no fragments larger than 25 mm remain.

Level 2 - (Suitable for high-security data - e.g. bulk personal data) This requires that the hard drives must be fully demagnetised using an intense magnetic field, before being shredded into no larger than 25 mm fragments. (Optical media should be incinerated)

Level 3 - (For Top secret data). This requires demagnetisation followed by shredding into no larger than 5 mm fragments.

Unsurprisingly, the cost, and level of audit trail required increases with level.

Technically, the wind-down of this project required level 2 destruction. However, the government selected level 3 destruction, on the basis of the high profile nature of the project and the very sensitive data it held.

That said, there are reasonable grounds for regarding the standards of data destruction to be highly excessive. However, the costs added by the high physical destruction standards are relatively modest, and it does ensure that it the procedure is followed, the chance of data compromise is essentially 0.

Edited by ChumpusRex

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I used to work for the company that were supplying the hardware for the test ID card system...the main servers were hosted in Doncaster, and I believe they were being mirrored to a disaster recovery site only a few miles down the road...Another site involved in hardware support (based in Stockport) were constantly being picketed for their involvement in the project...An old boss used to work with Jackboot Smith...Apparently she was a bit of a tyrant...what a surprise...

Edited by Dave Beans

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I bet the insurance cost will be a large percentage.

The Govt says we have destroyed all the data, done by third party and if not true then legal cases will be launched, so insurance will be taken out.

Sad statement on our society.

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... ranked their opposition to the ID scheme as one of the top three reasons for NOT voting Labour. ..

Much as I disliked the fact that Blair was a Thatcherite and the "third way" was Tory Lite the main reason that I wanted New Labour to lose was ID cards. I loathe the Tories and could never and will never vote for them. Had I have bothered it would have been Lib Dem. Given their turncoat and disgusting performance I am pleased I didn't bother.

If, like me you are centre left and want a decent centre left party that people can actually vote for there are so many reasons to hate Blair and what he did to British politics. It makes me laugh every time I read some teapot loony on here describe him (Blair) as a socialist, or for that matter Bob Diamond's mate Gordon Brown.

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Personally I never understood the need for expensive biometric cards. We're all walking biometrics for Chrissake! All you need is us and a database.

christ on a bike...imagine the mess erasing THAT trial....

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Guest eight

An old boss used to work with Jackboot Smith...Apparently she was a bit of a tyrant...what a surprise...

But.... what about all the people who used to run up to her in the street, desperate to know when they could have their ID card? Imagine their disappointment now.

eight

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But.... what about all the people who used to run up to her in the street, desperate to know when they could have their ID card? Imagine their disappointment now.

eight

Can they have a refund?

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probably lost it already....its just a cover to pretend they are being careful.

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Or they could download a simple file shredder for free. What exactly is going to cost £400K?

It's probably on all the Government computers. This was considered essential so that the local bobby, for instance, could call up your medical records on demand :rolleyes:.

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What a load of crap on here about ID cards and miss information about them.

I have a UK ID card and it is the best thing I spent £30 on. It has saved me time, money and got me out of difficult situations.

There is less information on it than a driving licence. My address is on my driving licence it is not on an ID card.

The ID card has only one item more than a passport and that is your encrypted fingerprint details - so what is the big problem.

I have travelled all over Europe on my ID card, it fits in my wallet and is easy to carry round.

When I was in Singapore and my passport was back at the hotel I used it several times including ID for an internet connection.

It has also been accepted in Hong Kong and Australia by Banks.

A couple of weeks ago I had my bag stolen containing my passport in Spain. I travelled home on my ID card with Ryanair.

All the government had to do was remove the fingerprint details and give people the choice of a passport or ID card or both.

Of course charge the appropriate fee.

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