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Landlady Let Herself In Without Permission Today

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I was at my girlfriend's flat today as I stayed over last night and am not working today. She had gone off to work as usual. Early afternoon I heard a knock at the door, decided to ignore it as I was not properly dressed and not expecting anybody, then surprise surprise I hear keys a-jangling and somebody starts to let themselves in. I stopped them at the door, turns out it was the landlady and her builder letting themselves in. She tells me upstairs have a rot problem which she thinks might have spread down to my girlfriend's flat, she just tried to call my girlfriend but she wasn't answering (she is at work!) and they just wanted to take a look.

I told her she can't just let herself into somebody's home without giving any notice, she started giving me hassle asking who I was to be telling her that, it is supposed to be a single tenancy and I am not the tenant (I have my own flat elsewhere, cheeky cow!), she wouldn't normally let herself in but it would be terribly inconvenient to come back another day. I said that's not how it works and regardless of who I am, the rule is that she can't let herself in (unless it is an emergency of course, which it was not). In the end it's not my flat and I don't want to start a fight so I told her to come back in 10 minutes while I got dressed and let her look at the walls.

I am so sick of landlords letting themselves into rental flats without notice, they seem to think that tenants are not entitled to the same comforts of home (e.g. not having strangers poke around their houses while they are out) as exalted landowners like themselves. They are also 100% aware that there are zero penalties for them if they break these rules, whereas if we break any rules they can evict us and withhold deposit money. I hate renting in this country.

UPDATE: My girlfriend called the landlady up from work afterwards, the landlady said she was shocked at how arrogant and rude I was :lol: but she apologised profusely to my girlfriend for letting herself in without notice. Anyway, my girlfriend seemed to think it was pretty funny. Result!

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I was at my girlfriend's flat today as I stayed over last night and am not working today. She had gone off to work as usual. Early afternoon I heard a knock at the door, decided to ignore it as I was not properly dressed and not expecting anybody, then surprise surprise I hear keys a-jangling and somebody starts to let themselves in. I stopped them at the door, turns out it was the landlady and her builder letting themselves in. She tells me upstairs have a rot problem which she thinks might have spread down to my girlfriend's flat, she just tried to call my girlfriend but she wasn't answering (she is at work!) and they just wanted to take a look.

I told her she can't just let herself into somebody's home without giving any notice, she started giving me hassle asking who I was to be telling her that, it is supposed to be a single tenancy and I am not the tenant (I have my own flat elsewhere, cheeky cow!), she wouldn't normally let herself in but it would be terribly inconvenient to come back another day. I said that's not how it works and regardless of who I am, the rule is that she can't let herself in (unless it is an emergency of course, which it was not). In the end it's not my flat and I don't want to start a fight so I told her to come back in 10 minutes while I got dressed and let her look at the walls.

I am so sick of landlords letting themselves into rental flats without notice, they seem to think that tenants are not entitled to the same comforts of home (e.g. not having strangers poke around their houses while they are out) as exalted landowners like themselves. They are also 100% aware that there are zero penalties for them if they break these rules, whereas if we break any rules they can evict us and withhold deposit money. I hate renting in this country.

UPDATE: My girlfriend called the landlady up from work afterwards, the landlady said she was shocked at how arrogant and rude I was :lol: but she apologised profusely to my girlfriend for letting herself in without notice. Anyway, my girlfriend seemed to think it was pretty funny. Result!

Is she a looker?

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I've had a few landlords like this.

Just change the locks, don't bother to tell the landlady and if she complains then tell her she shouldn't be trying her key in the lock without permission.

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Just change the locks, don't bother to tell the landlady and if she complains then tell her she shouldn't be trying her key in the lock without permission.

... and then get evicted.

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Ignoring what the law is and accepting that, whatever the law may be, it is unacceptable for landlords to constantly let themselves in to their tenants' properties with or without notice, were the landlord's actions in this case wholly unreasonable?

The landlord had inspected the flat above with her builder. (OK we don't know how long before the tenant had reported the problem, but at least we have a landlord apparently willing to sort a problem out.) Presumably the builder tells the landlord that there is a rot problem that may have spread to the flat below. Almost certainly not urgent, but still serious and possibly a health hazard. They are both on the spot. It would obviously be convenient to both if they could just nip into the flat below to see if the problem has spread. The landlord does not enter willy-nilly. She rings the tenant, but gets no reply. She knocks on the door, but gets no reply.

Let's assume you are a good upstanding landlord and your builder is as honest as the day is long. You have every reason to believe the flat is empty. You only want to nip in for less than a minute. Are you going to get your key out or go away and arrange to come back another day? You decide to nip in. On entering you are confronted by a man you have never seen before who asks you who you are and what you are doing. Confronted by this man who holds the irrational belief that he should not answer the door unless he is expecting someone, you naturally ask him who he is and what he is doing in the flat, neither of which you would have asked if he had opened the door.

(Just being a devil's advocate :rolleyes: )

Edited by Damocles

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Ignoring what the law is and accepting that, whatever the law may be, it is unacceptable for landlords to constantly let themselves in to their tenants' properties with or without notice, were the landlord's actions in this case wholly unreasonable?

The landlord had inspected the flat above with her builder. (OK we don't know how long before the tenant had reported the problem, but at least we have a landlord apparently willing to sort a problem out.) Presumably the builder tells the landlord that there is a rot problem that may have spread to the flat below. Almost certainly not urgent, but still serious and possibly a health hazard. They are both on the spot. It would obviously be convenient to both if they could just nip into the flat below to see if the problem has spread. The landlord does not enter willy-nilly. She rings the tenant, but gets no reply. She knocks on the door, but gets no reply.

Let's assume you are a good upstanding landlord and your builder is as honest as the day is long. You have every reason to believe the flat is empty. You only want to nip in for less than a minute. Are you going to get your key out or go away and arrange to come back another day? You decide to nip in. On entering you are confronted by a man you have never seen before who asks you who you are and what you are doing. Confronted by this man who holds the irrational belief that he should not answer the door unless he is expecting someone, you naturally ask him who he is and what he is doing in the flat, neither of which you would have asked if he had opened the door.

(Just being a devil's advocate :rolleyes: )

True, but as you rightly point out, there is an Act of Parliament which forbids her from putting her key in the lock unless it is an emergency. Therefore her reasons, or my reasons, or the price of a bucket of fish have nothing to do with it. I cannot walk into her home without permission, nor she mine. It has happened to me in other properties before, and to friends and relatives of mine. Landlords need to understand that even though they have a set of keys, they are not allowed to let themselves in without permission, no matter how much they might want to.

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True, but as you rightly point out, there is an Act of Parliament which forbids her from putting her key in the lock unless it is an emergency. Therefore her reasons, or my reasons, or the price of a bucket of fish have nothing to do with it. I cannot walk into her home without permission, nor she mine. It has happened to me in other properties before, and to friends and relatives of mine. Landlords need to understand that even though they have a set of keys, they are not allowed to let themselves in without permission, no matter how much they might want to.

I just pointed out to my landlord that letting herself in without my presence invalidated my contents insurance, which it did. That seemed to work. It was a language she understood.

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True, but as you rightly point out, there is an Act of Parliament which forbids her from putting her key in the lock unless it is an emergency. Therefore her reasons, or my reasons, or the price of a bucket of fish have nothing to do with it. I cannot walk into her home without permission, nor she mine. It has happened to me in other properties before, and to friends and relatives of mine. Landlords need to understand that even though they have a set of keys, they are not allowed to let themselves in without permission, no matter how much they might want to.

Actually I did not point out that there is "an Act of Parliament which forbids her from putting her key in the lock unless it is an emergency". There is no such Act. What the legal position is has been discussed a bit on this site! http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=138346&st=0&p=2419371entry2419371

What I did say was that, whatever the law may be, it is unacceptable for landlords to constantly let themselves in whether they give notice or not.

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I just pointed out to my landlord that letting herself in without my presence invalidated my contents insurance, which it did. That seemed to work. It was a language she understood.

Clever!

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I just pointed out to my landlord that letting herself in without my presence invalidated my contents insurance, which it did. That seemed to work. It was a language she understood.

A contract that can be invalidated by the action of a third party over who you have no control?

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A contract that can be invalidated by the action of a third party over who you have no control?

Doesn't really matter if it's correct, as long as it stops his landlady from dropping in unannounced.

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A contract that can be invalidated by the action of a third party over who you have no control?

Why does that surprise you? These things are written by an insurance company trying to find ways of not paying you.

Get a copy of your home contents insurance and read the fine print. Seriiously. I was surprised at mine. I'd have never thought of using it as a reason for preventing LL access when I wasn't at home until I read my policy and stumbled across the exclusion and had a "every cloud has a silver lining moment." I suspect not all home contents policies will be invalidated by knowingly allowing a non-resident entrance without your presence, but mine was.

People in Brisbane have copped this. Some policies state that they cover flood damage, but it is only in the fine print that you find out that flood does not include water flowing from rivers creeks or dams, i.e. the most likely cause of flood. There is even one case being contested now where a house was hit by a flash flood that did most of the damage, but was then flooded by the river - insurance company decided that they only had to pay 15% of the damage bill.

Edited by Tiger Woods?

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Why does that surprise you? These things are written by an insurance company trying to find ways of not paying you.

Get a copy of your home contents insurance and read the fine print. Seriiously. I was surprised at mine. I'd have never thought of using it as a reason for preventing LL access when I wasn't at home until I read my policy and stumbled across the exclusion and had a "every cloud has a silver lining moment." I suspect not all home contents policies will be invalidated by knowingly allowing a non-resident entrance without your presence, but mine was.

People in Brisbane have copped this. Some policies state that they cover flood damage, but it is only in the fine print that you find out that flood does not include water flowing from rivers creeks or dams, i.e. the most likely cause of flood. There is even one case being contested now where a house was hit by a flash flood that did most of the damage, but was then flooded by the river - insurance company decided that they only had to pay 15% of the damage bill.

Not quite as I first thought! "Knowingly" makes all the difference.

You have of course bamboozled your landlady, because what is in your terms of insurance is of no concern to her. As between you and your landlady what is important is what your agreement says and what the law is.

Here's a conundrum - if your tenancy agreement says the landlord can have access on notice, is your insurance void?

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  • 240 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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