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Age Discrimination

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Ive recently come back to the UK after 10 years abroad and am temporarily staying at my parents with my partner and 9 month old baby.

I though this would be a temporary measure as in a few weeks, until i found a suitable 2 bedroom apartment costing in the region of 900PCM.

However i have now put offers in for 4 apartments and on every single one of these apartments i have been turned down on the basis that theyd dont want to be renting to people without children.

Now these flats are what would always have been classed as starter homes for families, so now in the UK im priced out of buying such places should i wish to avoid negotive equity and im now also banned from renting them on the basis ive done the inhumane crime of having a child .... what a lovely place this is.

We both have good paying jobs, good references non smokers, no pets and we'll even tell the agency what we've had for breakfast to show we're almost civilised.

But im wondering after the case this week of those Gays being victorious in court if it is legal to discriminate against babies when renting, not that id take it further just seems wrong in todays society that people could be this way.

With this hassle and that of affordability of property, im now thinking of moving back to where i came from and taking my family and 6 figure salary to somewhere where the people arent so vile in relation to renting to families. As honest working folk clearly arent welcome.

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I wonder about this as in my local agents and paper you even see 4 bedroom properties to rent with the caption "Non-smokers, no pets. Professional couple preferred."

I take it by implying "couple" they mean two people with no children. By "professional" I guess they should be old enough to have gained a Professional qualification.

Also have seen this although more on newsagent cards for house shares "Suit, non-smoking, single, professional female". Surely that is sexist but you often see the contact name is a man!!!

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Ive recently come back to the UK after 10 years abroad and am temporarily staying at my parents with my partner and 9 month old baby.

I though this would be a temporary measure as in a few weeks, until i found a suitable 2 bedroom apartment costing in the region of 900PCM.

However i have now put offers in for 4 apartments and on every single one of these apartments i have been turned down on the basis that theyd dont want to be renting to people without children.

Now these flats are what would always have been classed as starter homes for families, so now in the UK im priced out of buying such places should i wish to avoid negotive equity and im now also banned from renting them on the basis ive done the inhumane crime of having a child .... what a lovely place this is.

We both have good paying jobs, good references non smokers, no pets and we'll even tell the agency what we've had for breakfast to show we're almost civilised.

But im wondering after the case this week of those Gays being victorious in court if it is legal to discriminate against babies when renting, not that id take it further just seems wrong in todays society that people could be this way.

With this hassle and that of affordability of property, im now thinking of moving back to where i came from and taking my family and 6 figure salary to somewhere where the people arent so vile in relation to renting to families. As honest working folk clearly arent welcome.

You have my sympathies, nothing more soul destroying than returning to the UK after spending an extended period abroad. The wife, 3 month old daughter and I had similar problems to you in our property search recently, and we were looking at 3 bedroom houses. Not sure who they were renting to as landlords were specifiying no sharers, and then when we went to view we would be told that they also didn't want children under a certain age. We had a number of offers refused for no good reason before we eventually found somewhere really nice and are as settled as you can be in rented accommodation now. I think it helped that in the house we eventually took, we met the landord and landlady before we moved in (only because they happened to be in the house when we were viewing) and they gave thaem a chance to assess us themselves. It's a pain when only dealing with the EA as you have no idea what ulterior motives they have and what information they are passing on to the landlords.

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Why did you tell them you have a child and/or pets and/or smoke?

If you're renting a HOME, it is your HOME, and no landlord has the right to tell you what you can or cannot do in that property.

You can change the carpets, redecorate, whatever you like, AS LONG AS when you leave, you put the property back to the same condition as when you took on the rental (assuming fair wear and tear).

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9 month old baby.

2 bedroom apartment costing in the region of 900PCM.

However i have now put offers in for 4 apartments and on every single one of these apartments i have been turned down on the basis that theyd dont want to be renting to people without children.

Flats are crap if you have a baby/child/ever buy anything heavier than a sandwich.

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Why did you tell them you have a child and/or pets and/or smoke?

If you're renting a HOME, it is your HOME, and no landlord has the right to tell you what you can or cannot do in that property.

You can change the carpets, redecorate, whatever you like, AS LONG AS when you leave, you put the property back to the same condition as when you took on the rental (assuming fair wear and tear).

Yes, that's the way it is and it's the attitude to take once you've moved in but unfortunately it's an attitude that doesn't go down too well whilst you're actually looking for somewhere.

With regard to a rental property being the tenants home, unfortuantely a lot of landlords today (particularly the often odious accidental landlords) don't see it that way.

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Its a disgrace, many couples will never have kids because of this.

We apparently live in one of the freest countries in the world yet I am not even allowed to own a dog. And who has this power over me....some spud that means nothing to me and who is a nobody in all walks of life except he took out a BTL mortgage.

Right now I hate the UK because I have been robbed of a decent future.

Edited by Papa Serf

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Its a disgrace, many couples will never have kids because of this.

We apparently live in one of the freest countries in the world yet I am not even allowed to own a dog. And who has this power over me....some spud that means nothing to me and who is a nobody in all walks of life except he took out a BTL mortgage.

Right now I hate the UK because I have been robbed of a decent future.

See my post above - you ARE allowed a dog, and if you got one, and the landlord treid to throw you out because of a clause in your AST, then the his claim would be laughed out of court.

Any contract has to be reasonable and reciprocal. What you are renting is a HOME, and you have the same rights as any homeowner to use it as such. It is completely irrelevant to the landlord what you do in your own home.

Another misconception with renting is with damage disputes with the landlord when you move out. The law is actually much more on the side of the renter than you might imagine.

For example, you cannot be charged cleaning / damages to, for example, a carpet if it is more than 5 years old. The reason being that the landlord is essentially running a business, and the residual value of a five year old carpet is zero. It is expected that a five year old carpet, in a rental property, is worthless.

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Thanks for that Lepista but can they refuse to renew the tenancy once the year is up? or give you notice.

Your tenancy (assuming you are on an AST, never expires - my EA tried to charge me a renewal fee at the end of year one, but I pointed out that the contract, by definition, goes onto a 2-month rolling status, where either party has to give notice if they intend to finish.

Yes, the risk is that the landlord just givees you two months notice. Not sure how that technically could be fought in court. I don't know if the landlord has to give a reason for termination of contract? (does anybody here know?)

If you were wanting to be diplomatic, you could discuss with the landlord, and offer a compromise - for example, if his concern is the additional cleaning that might be required when you move out then maybe offer to have the carpets professionally cleaned when you (eventually) leave. Alternatively, you could hint that you are wanting a dog, and that ideally you'd like a property where you can do this - he might get the hint that you're looking around for other places, and as a sweetener, he might suggest that he'd allow pets.

Or you could negotiate a longer term lease (say tying you, and him, in for two years - this would reaquire a new contract drawn up, on the 'pretence' of securing tenancy) Once that's signed, you would have at least two years, by which time the landlord either isn't bothered, or hasn't found out.

lots of options open really, depending on how open / sneaky / rutheless you want to be.

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You have my sympathies, nothing more soul destroying than returning to the UK after spending an extended period abroad. The wife, 3 month old daughter and I had similar problems to you in our property search recently, and we were looking at 3 bedroom houses. Not sure who they were renting to as landlords were specifiying no sharers, and then when we went to view we would be told that they also didn't want children under a certain age. We had a number of offers refused for no good reason before we eventually found somewhere really nice and are as settled as you can be in rented accommodation now. I think it helped that in the house we eventually took, we met the landord and landlady before we moved in (only because they happened to be in the house when we were viewing) and they gave thaem a chance to assess us themselves. It's a pain when only dealing with the EA as you have no idea what ulterior motives they have and what information they are passing on to the landlords.

Another Bingobob, how strange :o

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So the landlord has all the power then, do as he says or find a new home, this time with a dog in tow.

But your right if I suckup to him he may let me stay.... oh pleeeese.

Sorry PS, I was under the impression that you might have been asking for advice, so I was trying to be helpful.

I didn't realise that you aren't actually interested in what you originally talked about.

If you notice, the dimplomatic route was only one option that I presented.

I have asked the question about whether the landlord actually has the right to give you notice 'on a whim'? I don't know (but suspect an answer).

At the end of the day, the landlord wants a tenant in the property so that they can make money. If they don't have a tenant ( or have voids) then they are losing money.

If you've been there a while, then you are probably worth more to him as a good tenant with a dog, rather than them having a void and the future unknown of a potentially nightmarer tenant.

It also depends on the professionalism of your landlord as to the route you might choose to take.

So no, YOU have all the power.

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Just as another point, the precedent has recently been set that a B&B "landlord" does not have the right to choose who they "rent" their rooms out to.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-12214012

I thnik some of the BTL brigade are going to be in for a shock at some pouint when renters start challenging their tenancy agreements in courts.

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I appreciate your thought but I've had enough of this. It must be 10 years when I first uttered the words "I'm not buying a house at these prices" after seeing my Dads house double in value in 6 years, 10 years!! I've lost no matter what happens now.

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The "amateur" and "reluctant" BTL / landlord may come into play here. Yes you're right, they probably see it as THEIR property which you are borrowing for a fee, rather than YOUR property which you are renting from them. Hence the no small kids (to prevent crayon marks etc). No matter that they are cheap crap property with cheap magnolia walls.

Not sure what to say really, except to negotiate as above. If a landlord is reasonable they should be willing to negotiate. Unreasonable landlords you would steer clear of anyway.

900pcm for a little flat? Do you live in London?

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I appreciate your thought but I've had enough of this. It must be 10 years when I first uttered the words "I'm not buying a house at these prices" after seeing my Dads house double in value in 6 years, 10 years!! I've lost no matter what happens now.

Why have you lost "no matter what happens"?

Are you suggesting that this is a reason to go and buy a house? :unsure:

We are watching one of the largest financial meltdowns in human history, and you are worried about having a dog, and whether your landlord would "approve"?

What exactly is your point?

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I've lost 10 years of my life. Working, saving, doing without being prudent paying rent to live in a property I dont like because I cant afford anything better. And to top it all off my tax and savings and being used to bailout the very people that caused all this mess. How much longer will it be. 1 year, 2 years. 10 years of being right but proven wrong. I see the meaning of Cassandra.

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I've lost 10 years of my life. Working, saving, doing without being prudent paying rent to live in a property I dont like because I cant afford anything better. And to top it all off my tax and savings and being used to bailout the very people that caused all this mess. How much longer will it be. 1 year, 2 years. 10 years of being right but proven wrong. I see the meaning of Cassandra.

If you are that hacked off, sign on the rock'n'roll and start throwing rocks.

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If you think like a victim, you'll become a victim. Theres opportunity in all change, its just a case of changing your mindset to move with those changes and patience is a virtue. :)

+1

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If you think like a victim, you'll become a victim. Theres opportunity in all change, its just a case of changing your mindset to move with those changes and patience is a virtue. :)

Thanks but I'm no victim but 10 years is a long time and I'm hitting the really angry stage now and as for patience....I only have so many years left in me and I dont want to wait anothe 5 years.

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Getting back to the OP my advice to you then is sign a contract, say you have no kids then you'll be ok for atleast 12 months. Maybe longer if your kid lives like Anne Frank. (The fact that is even remotely true is a disgrace)

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  • 315 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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