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Dave Beans

50,000 To Leave Ireland This Year

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Higher than the peak during the 80's...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/20/ireland-exodus-workers-thinktank

Emigration from Ireland to Britain, America and other parts of the world will reach levels beyond even those of the recession-stricken 1980s, a study has concluded.

Fifty thousand Irish people will seek to move this year, one of Ireland's leading economic thinktanks has predicted. The Economic and Social Research Institute has also projected that a further 25,000 jobs will be lost – most of these in the construction, financial and public sector. The 50,000 people the ESRI expects to leave compares to 44,000 who emigrated in 1989, the peak year for emigration during the 1980s.

These latest economic forecasts came on the same day that Ireland's prime minister, Brian Cowen, announced the date for a general election. The country will go to the polls on 11 March, earlier than the outgoing Fianna Fáil-Green party coalition had hoped. Cowen's hand has been forced by six ministerial resignations from his cabinet following this week's failed attempt to bring him down as Fianna Fáil's leader.

Among those areas of life in Ireland already affected by emigration are Gaelic sports, one of the defining institutions of the Irish nation. The Gaelic Athletic Association expressed concern that net emigration was creating a haemorrhage of talented players from Irish clubs and counties.

A GAA spokesman at their Croke Park headquarters pointed out that last autumn one of the Dublin county's star players, Niall Corkery, had left the country after the Gaelic football season ended.

He said that three top footballers for Louth county had also emigrated. According to the GAA's figures Gaelic football clubs across Ireland are losing 250 players a month to emigration.A spokesman for the GAA said the trend clearly indicated players were leaving the country.

"That would be indicative as to what is taking place at the moment. Traditionally you would have seen this impacting mainly on rural parishes and communities but it is happening much more pronounced in Dublin today. That is because a lot of the guys playing for clubs in the Greater Dublin area would be working in the construction sector and that as we know has fallen through the floor," he said.

At the London Irish Centre in Camden staff are reporting a surge in calls and emails from young Irish people about jobs in the UK.

Geoff Moore, the centre's welfare officer, said: "We run 'Employability Courses' for would be immigrants on how to get jobs in London and across Britain. We have situations at present where young people have flown over from Ireland just for the day to attend these sessions. The situation is different at present from the 1980s, when you had the lad just arrived in Euston station from Ireland with only a bag over his shoulder. The Irish immigrants this time around are at least better prepared."

Hazel Larkin said she was emigrating to Malaysia because she had friends there. She will leave Dublin for the far east with her daughters, aged 7 and 9, at Easter.

"One of my friends has offered me a job in PR and another in teaching in Kuala Lumpur.

"I came back to Ireland six years ago and I have not had a full time job since then. As a single parent with two kids there wasn't a job with high enough wages to make it worth my while to stay in full time employment… even course if there were any jobs left ," she said.

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Where to I wonder.. if only there was another English speaking country nearby they could go to.

Can't do much for housing demand there.

Edited by exiges

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Where to I wonder.. if only there was another English speaking country nearby they could go to.

Can't do much for housing demand there.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703921504576094201825868600.html

Interestingly, one of the main destinations is Poland...

The main destination for those leaving Ireland in 2010 was the U.K., which absorbed some 14,000 Irish immigrants. The next most-popular destinations were the newer EU member states, including Poland and the Czech Republic. EU members France and Germany came in third. Some 23,000 went to other countries, including Australia and New Zealand, and a modest 2,800 moved to the U.S., according to figures from Ireland's Central Statistics Office.

Edited by Dave Beans

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Guest The Relaxation Suite

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703921504576094201825868600.html

Interestingly, one of the main destinations is Poland...

Interesting stuff. This is 1.5% of the population - and the young end as well. I think where they go is irrelevant, especially with regards to the point made above about housing demand in the UK. 50,000 in total, only a fraction of these will go to Britain (14,000 last year for example) so that isn't the kind of influx that will affect house prices.

I would speculate that a similar exodus is/will occur across the rest of the British Isles soon enough - and see what that does for house prices.

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Interesting stuff. This is 1.5% of the population - and the young end as well. I think where they go is irrelevant, especially with regards to the point made above about housing demand in the UK. 50,000 in total, only a fraction of these will go to Britain (14,000 last year for example) so that isn't the kind of influx that will affect house prices.

I would speculate that a similar exodus is/will occur across the rest of the British Isles soon enough - and see what that does for house prices.

Dont worry. One of the Leprechauns has a money printer, dont you know. Lucky for the UK, it doesnt print pounds, but Euros. Lucky for the UK, we chose not to join the Eurozone. I say lucky, because it was a the worst judge of anything that seemed to have made the right decision, and given that the chances of him making the right decision were less likely that a bunch of monkeys coming up with Shakespeares complete works on their first attempt, I would say that we were very lucky indeed.

No matter, those banks that were completely hollowed out by a robbery more total than anything the IRA ever managed, are now once again flush with cash and raring to go. The Tiger is ready to roar once again.

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Dont worry. One of the Leprechauns has a money printer, dont you know. Lucky for the UK, it doesnt print pounds, but Euros. Lucky for the UK, we chose not to join the Eurozone. I say lucky, because it was a the worst judge of anything that seemed to have made the right decision, and given that the chances of him making the right decision were less likely that a bunch of monkeys coming up with Shakespeares complete works on their first attempt, I would say that we were very lucky indeed.

No matter, those banks that were completely hollowed out by a robbery more total than anything the IRA ever managed, are now once again flush with cash and raring to go. The Tiger is ready to roar once again.

Gordo's five "join the Euro" test questions...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_economic_tests

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/2975560.stm

1. Are business cycles and economic structures compatible so that we and others could live comfortably with euro interest rates on a permanent basis?

2. If problems emerge is there sufficient flexibility to deal with them?

3. Would joining EMU create better conditions for firms making long-term decisions to invest in Britain?

4. What impact would entry into EMU have on the competitive position of the UK's financial services industry, particularly the City's wholesale markets?

5. In summary, will joining EMU promote higher growth, stability and a lasting increase in jobs?

Conclusions:

1. There had been significant progress on convergence since 1997, but there remained some significant structural differences, such as in the housing market.

2. While UK flexibility had improved, they could not be confident that it is sufficient.

3. Euro membership would increase investment, but only if convergence and flexibility were sufficient.

4. The City of London, Britain's financial centre, would benefit from Eurozone membership.

5. Growth, stability and employment would increase as a result of euro membership, but only if convergence and flexibility were sufficient.

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I saw on the RTE News that some of the Cabinet ministers who resigned today/yesterday from the Fianna Fail led government (e.g. Mary Harney) will be entitled to one off payments of 250,000 euros and annual pensions for the rest of their life of 140,000 euro.

Any one wonder why Ireland is bankrupt - those figures are a disgrace! No wonder people want to emigrate.

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http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703921504576094201825868600.html

Interestingly, one of the main destinations is Poland...

I doubt many of them will be Irish born. It will be economic migrants returning home and fleeing the sinking ship.

UK plc has such global branding now that the same thing will not happen here. There are untold millions ready to replace those that flee, waiting for the border police to be given the nod and look the other way.

Will it be intra-company transfers, expansion of the EU into Northern Africa / Turkey or a slight of hand by the corporate puppets that sees the next leg of NWO swing into action?

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Ireland is an uninhabitable Rock with a transient populace.

Deal with it.

Exactly. I was in Dublin the past 3 days and it is starting to become quite depressing. There was a queue of taxis waiting for customers about a mile long next to our restaurant. Many of the drivers were Estern European, and the drivers we had were very grumpy...probably because of business. Dublin is an OK city, and the weather was good while we were there, but in truth it is little more than a provinical capital with none of the true big city feel that you get from London or other big European cities. The weather most of the time is aweful...you couldn't pay me to live there.

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Interesting stuff. This is 1.5% of the population - and the young end as well. I think where they go is irrelevant, especially with regards to the point made above about housing demand in the UK. 50,000 in total, only a fraction of these will go to Britain (14,000 last year for example) so that isn't the kind of influx that will affect house prices.

I would speculate that a similar exodus is/will occur across the rest of the British Isles soon enough - and see what that does for house prices.

Not so sure, add in the 10,000 Portugese, 15,000 Spanish etc from the other PIIGS etc and the low emigration rates from the UK at the moment, it all adds to demand, presumably in the rental sector. Also factor in the additional competition for jobs especially entry-level ones, so it wont be good for UK graduate/school leaver unemployment rates, currently standing at 21%.

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http://online.wsj.co...1825868600.html

Interestingly, one of the main destinations is Poland...

That is interesting!

So even the Polish proles are being screwed coz Dell and others who upped sticks from Ireland (as soon as the tax/rates breaks and European subsidy 'freeby' billions finished) to take advantage of the golden hellos and other subsidies offered by East European/Polish Govt (100's Billions Euro fund subsidies were switched to this area) are now re-employing former Irish workers!

It's about time you Irishman give up your beer for a while and researched why generation after generation the (puppet Govts/organised religion) Elites constantly devastate your country & bring your population to your knees.

Find out what is SO special about your ancestry/race/kin that makes you a target!

Edited by erranta

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That is interesting!

So even the Polish proles are being screwed coz Dell and others who upped sticks from Ireland (as soon as the tax/rates breaks and European subsidy 'freeby' billions finished) to take advantage of the golden hellos and other subsidies offered by East European/Polish Govt (100's Billions Euro fund subsidies were switched to this area) are now re-employing former Irish workers!

It's about time you Irishman give up your beer for a while and researched why generation after generation the (puppet Govts/organised religion) Elites constantly devastate your country & bring your population to your knees.

Find out what is SO special about your ancestry/race/kin that makes you a target!

As an Irishman living in the UK (since before the crash by the way), I have long understood that a little bit of anti-Irish bigotry disguised as banter is socially acceptable in some circles. As for Irishmen giving up 'their beer' to research why their 'race' is so 'special', I would invite you to come to my little corner of the North of England to see what real alcohol dependency looks like. But, to address your serious point, it is clear that elites have played their part in devastating the country, but it is also clear that the non-elites are to blame, all those people, many of whom I personally know, who thought it was acceptable to take out massive mortgages as if they were going into a shop to buy some sweets. Moreover, teachers in Ireland still earn more than university lecturers and professors in the UK, the police earn far more than the police here (you can not blame the government alone for this, you must also blame the ordinary people and the unions). The ordinary people of Ireland are as much to blame for this as the corrupt politicians and the banks and they know it, just don't want to admit it. As for masses of Irish going to the UK, actually, for the most part, young educated graduates, engineers, doctors and the like, who are in demand in certain parts of the UK are coming here - the tradespeople are going to Australia for the most part. The uneducated, unskilled, jobless are not going to bother leaving Ireland because social welfare provision in Ireland, despite the cuts, is still far in excess of what it is in the UK and elsewhere (perhaps that is still part of the problem).

I think, we should not forget that there are countless complex historical, economic and social reasons why Ireland is as it is, just like why the North of England is as it is. In my view, the standard of living in even the worst part of Ireland is still far higher than vast areas of England. Just remember that what happened in Ireland over the past 10 years is simply, as Robert Peston says, a more extreme version of a British disease:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/robertpeston/2010/11/hl_ireland_an_extreme_version.html

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I saw on the RTE News that some of the Cabinet ministers who resigned today/yesterday from the Fianna Fail led government (e.g. Mary Harney) will be entitled to one off payments of 250,000 euros and annual pensions for the rest of their life of 140,000 euro.

Any one wonder why Ireland is bankrupt - those figures are a disgrace! No wonder people want to emigrate.

That is appalling. :angry:

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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