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Allied Irish Bank Used Forged Documents To Claim House

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It's becoming increasing clear the entire banking system is one massive fraud, just as Injin said it was.

You do wonder if in reality anyone really owes anything, it's all worthless paper and promises.

Better get borrowing if you don't want to miss the party!

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http://examiner.ie/ireland/aib-used-forged-document-to-claim-couples-home-142337.html

Make sure you keep all copies of documents relating to house purchase

linked in the property pin

"The FSO cannot name financial institutions found guilty of wrongdoing and the couple feared AIB was pushing them in this direction to cover up the issue."

Charming ! Another toothless watchdog that exists for the benefit of its members rather than its customers.

I wonder if our own UK watchdog is similarly spineless?

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Scandalous.

Worse than robosigning (and that's bad enough) as they seem to have invented and forged a separate contract or at least major amendments to an existing contract.

It seems to be outright fraud and it's amazing that they're allowed to either investigate themselves or alternatively take it to the FSO.

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Scandalous.

Worse than robosigning (and that's bad enough) as they seem to have invented and forged a separate contract or at least major amendments to an existing contract.

It seems to be outright fraud and it's amazing that they're allowed to either investigate themselves or alternatively take it to the FSO.

It is just plain disgusting. Forge a contract for hundreds of thousands of euros, you get a bonus. Rob a bank of ten thousand euros in the classical fashion, you get 10 years hard labour. Seriously, this forged contract should be traced to its originator and everyone in the chain of command should be jailed...in just the same way as someone who drives the getaway car gets done for murder if their mate shoots someone whilst they are in the bank.

These days I always initial every page of a document I sign, and note that on the signature page. I also put a block-out line at the end of every written comment to prevent additions.

I came to the conclusion that this sort of thing has to be done, after catching an agent amending a check out document in her car after I had signed it.

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These days I always initial every page of a document I sign, and note that on the signature page. I also put a block-out line at the end of every written comment to prevent additions.

I came to the conclusion that this sort of thing has to be done, after catching an agent amending a check out document in her car after I had signed it.

Good tip, cheers.

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The pair originally signed a loan agreement on September 8, 2008, for a €120,000 bridging loan to finish an investment property they were building.

However, the couple were unable to sell the completed house in the depressed property market and ran into repayment difficulties.

A new "altered" loan agreement dated September 23, 2008, was produced by the bank giving AIB security over their investment property and their family home.

I don't get it? The story is not clear. So the bank gave them a €120,000 bridging loan and had

a] No security whatsoever on the family home, or the investment property.

b] Security only on the investment property.

Even if the bank didn't take a security out on either the investment property, these two people owe money to the bank. Forgetting allegations of falsified documents, surely there is a mechanism the banks can use to pursue the debt they are owed. Maybe charges against both properties.

No doubt some people here though would like a judge to rule that the iffy documents mean the borrowers should be released from the money they borrowed to speculate with. How dare they have to suffer a loss from not being able to sell the investment property on at a great profit, or squeeze a stupid renter for easy money. Stick it on the taxpayers bill. [edit to remove the b ) smilie face]

Edited by Venger

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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