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This is completely irrelevant, the only reason fuel costs more in remote areas is that fuel companies charge more to deliver it there. It's the same where I live, east Kent, although no other retailer- Tesco, Sports Direct, WH Smiths etc- adds a premium to the cost of items simply because we are a few miles further away from their warehouse.

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Why?

If you live in a remote place the price of fuel is astronomical (10/15p a litre more than in the cities at least) and the chances are you have a less than perfect public transport system so have no choice if you want to work. Many people living in rural areas are very likely to have poorly paid work (agriculture/forestry/nurses/cleaners) or at best seasonal tourist related jobs, the cost of fuel will make working almost pointless soon.

I drove around the North of Scotland a couple of years ago and was thankful for my fuel efficient car so I did not have to fill up whilst I was there - the prices were at least 10p a litre more than the more habitated bits.

This is a long standing theory of mine to help the more remote parts of the UK, and in this I include places like Cumbria. Cut 10p off the tax and prices could be comparable with those of us who live in the cities. I would hazard a guess that most city dwellers use cars as a luxury rather than the absolute neccesity that they are in the more rural parts.

Edited by lulu

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If you live in a remote place the price of fuel is astronomical (10/15p a litre more than in the cities at least)

Presumably the price premium at remote outlets is determined not by the additional cost of getting it there but by the maximum amount that can be charged before it becomes worthwhile for most people to fill up somewhere else. So any handouts to country folk and second home owners will have to be redeemable nationwide otherwise the local retailers would delightedly reign in the extra slack. That being the case a voucher based system wouldn't work as they would have a cash value and couldn't be allocated in proportion to petrol use, so the only option would be some kind of nationally usable non-transferable discount card, or some sort of send in your receipts approach. All sounds very complicated and open to abuse. Can't see it happening really.

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This is a long standing theory of mine to help the more remote parts of the UK, and in this I include places like Cumbria. Cut 10p off the tax and prices could be comparable with those of us who live in the cities.

Why? If you want to live in the middle of nowhere, then you have to accept that some things cost more. It costs money to drive a tanker to the back of beyond, and I don't see why I should pay for it. If you want cheaper petrol, live somewhere less remote.

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Why? If you want to live in the middle of nowhere, then you have to accept that some things cost more. It costs money to drive a tanker to the back of beyond, and I don't see why I should pay for it. If you want cheaper petrol, live somewhere less remote.

But you are not paying for it, the bill for decent public transport in these areas would be even higher and you really would be paying for that. Cutting a few pence off the duty in the remote areas would be at minimal cost and econmically would make more sense than these areas needing ever more support from the rest of the UK.

Think about how much the rest of the UK pays to provide London for all the public transport investment it gets for a start.

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Why? If you want to live in the middle of nowhere, then you have to accept that some things cost more. It costs money to drive a tanker to the back of beyond, and I don't see why I should pay for it. If you want cheaper petrol, live somewhere less remote.

Just as long as the taxes from someone in the middle of Scotland (including the fuel tax) never go anywhere near funding your public transport then.

Incidentally, Cumbria isn't remote IMO (apart from Alston, and I know Barrow feels like you've gone past Earth and into hell). High fuel prices in some parts are mostly down to exploiting tourists visiting the Lake District. Petrol prices in Penrith, just outside the Lakes on the other hand, are comparable with Manchester.

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Scottish people who live in remote rural areas are quite close to the North Sea.

Yet a lot of them live further away from a refinery than anyone else in the UK. Nearest is Grangemouth. That's the excuse they use to whack up the petrol and heating oil.

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How do decide what is "remote" and what is not?

Simple! You are remote if the tube trains don't make the toilet rattle! :huh:

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Well I'll just need to drive somewhere remote to get me petrol then!

Doh!

Lib Dems pandering to their constituency which is largely rural. Little good it will do them they will still get slaughtered at the next election.

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But you are not paying for it, the bill for decent public transport in these areas would be even higher and you really would be paying for that.

Again, why should I pay for public transport in a remote area? If you want to live 10 miles from the nearest shop, then pay the price. I'd love to live with no neighbours and miles from shops, but I accept that doing so is inconvenient and costly.

Think about how much the rest of the UK pays to provide London for all the public transport investment it gets for a start.

We could argue the toss on who is really paying the subsidy, but on the general point I'm with you, I don't think the subsidies should be paid, and if they are, then it should be paid (over time) by the users of the service.

Just as long as the taxes from someone in the middle of Scotland (including the fuel tax) never go anywhere near funding your public transport then.

No problem with that at all.

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Why?

If you live in a remote place the price of fuel is astronomical (10/15p a litre more than in the cities at least) and the chances are you have a less than perfect public transport system so have no choice if you want to work. Many people living in rural areas are very likely to have poorly paid work (agriculture/forestry/nurses/cleaners) or at best seasonal tourist related jobs, the cost of fuel will make working almost pointless soon.

I drove around the North of Scotland a couple of years ago and was thankful for my fuel efficient car so I did not have to fill up whilst I was there - the prices were at least 10p a litre more than the more habitated bits.

This is a long standing theory of mine to help the more remote parts of the UK, and in this I include places like Cumbria. Cut 10p off the tax and prices could be comparable with those of us who live in the cities. I would hazard a guess that most city dwellers use cars as a luxury rather than the absolute neccesity that they are in the more rural parts.

On the plus side it doesn't take you 90mins to go 18 miles you can prob do it in 40 mins.

Plus you will prob get 55 mpg instead of 40mpg.

So per mile it is cheaper up there and you save hours a week not in traffic, overall you have it much better.

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Again, why should I pay for public transport in a remote area? If you want to live 10 miles from the nearest shop, then pay the price. I'd love to live with no neighbours and miles from shops, but I accept that doing so is inconvenient and costly.

Everyone in the countryside needs their own transport because there is no public transport. The idea of increasing fuel duty to discourage car use does not hurt everyone equally. Any rise sufficient to stop the city dweller driving a mile to the supermarket is going to kill the country dweller who must drive 20. Thus fuel tax is a tax on country dwellers. You may well like "no neighbours", but you would not like no pubs and no shops near by, where you have to drive to go anywhere. Few people can live alone on deserted island, even though they may fantasise about it. Perhaps the solution is to ban private ownership of cars for those who live in built-up areas since they can walk everywhere. If you want a car, you must justify it by living out in the sticks.

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Everyone in the countryside needs their own transport because there is no public transport.

There is no public transport because no one uses it.

Don't give discounted petrol. Give free public transport to everyone.

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  • 294 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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