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LiveinHope

Car For Old Biddy

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Same model as attached pic

Respect.

As a short term measure, have you tried inflating the front tyres to something close to the max printed on them? It will lighten up the steering a lot. If she was an "enthusiastic" driver, I would worry about the small loss of traction, but as she is pootling about, it doesn't really matter.

She will hate modern cars as all of the switches will be on different sides. (wipers, indicators etc)

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She will hate modern cars as all of the switches will be on different sides. (wipers, indicators etc)

This is the problem I face,

But, double declutching to get into 1st, foot operated dip switch, and the fact that the car now can't be allowed to get dirty since giving it a sparkling clean and towel dry after every trip is too exhausting,

I am hoping that I can accomplish a gradual transition if I get the choice right

As I said, I doubt I will ever persuade my mum to sell the old one, which would be better off with a collector

I'll try the tyres, ta

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On the automatic gearbox issue, I wish manufacturers would design one with a feature whereby whenever the car comes to a total halt, the gearbox is automatically placed into neutral and you have to move it back into drive before the car will go again. An American policeman friend tells me that you wouldn't believe the number of rear-end shunts caused by someone getting distracted in a traffic jam or at the lights with the gearbox in drive mode and the car held still on the footbrake alone. They then let their foot off the footbrake as the result of some distraction or other, the car creeps forward and rogers the one in front of it. That would be my big fear with automatics and older drivers.

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Plenty of room for handbags! ;)

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Yikes! I used the Torpoint ferry quite a bit when I lived in the south-west, and seem to remember that the gates at the end of the deck are pretty solid affairs. She must have hit it under quite heavy acceleration in order to go straight through it and into the drink.

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best bit about automatic is when you brake facing up hill the brakes will lock on until you touch the accelerator so no hand brake or clutch etc. Great if she lives in a hilly area or isnt great with a clutch or heavy hand brake.

There arent many modern cars that are going to like being run every blue moon for 2 or 3 miles though so if she is likely to only be doing short runs then get something that will be cheap to service and have constant injector replacements.

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+ 1

But to be fair, she has never caused an accident and does accept her limitations, and never does dual carriageways etc

(not sure what the view in the mirrors would be)

Don't want to sound harsh but if she is not confident to drive on dual carriageways then she is not confident to drive - full stop.

Personally I think many old drivers are far more dangerous than drunk drivers.

Give me the choice of getting in a car with a 30 year old bloke who has had 5 pints - or an 85 year old woman ?

I wouldn't even blink when making the choice. And it wouldn't be the granny !!

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Don't want to sound harsh but if she is not confident to drive on dual carriageways then she is not confident to drive - full stop.

I don't agree. People aren't suddenly at the top of their game one day and gaga the next: our faculties and abilities decline gradually with age, and at different trajectories for different people. For the overwhelming majority, driving is not a competitive sport: it's a necessary, routine activity without which many people's quality of life would be severely impacted. I accept that there has to be a minimum level of competence below which you shouldn't be allowed on the road. But for someone who realises that their eyesight, reaction times, abilities of sustained concentration etc. are not what they once were, it seems to me perfectly sensible to try to avoid driving in very heavy traffic and/or negotiating relatively complex road layouts. This lady could probably negotiate dual carriageways perfectly safely if she had to, but has made the decision that she could live without the stress of being aggressively tailgated by yobs in BMWs, getting stuck in rush hour queues, etc. etc. Just because someone does not have the driving abilities of Michael Schumacher is no reason to confine them to house arrest.

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I don't agree. People aren't suddenly at the top of their game one day and gaga the next: our faculties and abilities decline gradually with age, and at different trajectories for different people. For the overwhelming majority, driving is not a competitive sport: it's a necessary, routine activity without which many people's quality of life would be severely impacted. I accept that there has to be a minimum level of competence below which you shouldn't be allowed on the road. But for someone who realises that their eyesight, reaction times, abilities of sustained concentration etc. are not what they once were, it seems to me perfectly sensible to try to avoid driving in very heavy traffic and/or negotiating relatively complex road layouts. This lady could probably negotiate dual carriageways perfectly safely if she had to, but has made the decision that she could live without the stress of being aggressively tailgated by yobs in BMWs, getting stuck in rush hour queues, etc. etc. Just because someone does not have the driving abilities of Michael Schumacher is no reason to confine them to house arrest.

Peoples reactions/eyesight at a certain age get worse. For the vast majority anyway. I bet you after 5 pints my reactions would be better than an average 85 year old.

I don't think pretending it doesn't exist helps anybody. Many older people in cars are simply extremely dangerous.

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Peoples reactions/eyesight at a certain age get worse.

That's why she no longer thinks it wise to go on dual carriageways, and to be frank, its not her 'driving' that is the problem, however, she realises her response to other people's poor driving might be too slow, or her restriction to 50 mph might annoy, which is simply a sad reflection of the level of intimidation on today's roads.

On the roads she does drive on, she is OK, especially as most are restricted to 30 mph and others 40 mph, and those with a national speed limit are rural lanes, where to drive at 60 mph would be nuts.

If other drivers want to go faster than the speed limit on town roads and get frustrated by an old biddy driving within the speed limit, that is THEIR problem.

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That's why she no longer thinks it wise to go on dual carriageways, and to be frank, its not her 'driving' that is the problem, however, she realises her response to other people's poor driving might be too slow, or her restriction to 50 mph might annoy, which is simply a sad reflection of the level of intimidation on today's roads.

On the roads she does drive on, she is OK, especially as most are restricted to 30 mph and others 40 mph, and those with a national speed limit are rural lanes, where to drive at 60 mph would be nuts.

If other drivers want to go faster than the speed limit on town roads and get frustrated by an old biddy driving within the speed limit, that is THEIR problem.

+1. Though ironically, I have less of a problem with people doing 50 on the nearside lane of a dual carriageway - because you can overtake them at any time you like - than on a national limit single carriageway when there are no hazards present to prevent you from driving up to the limit. I quite often cruise at 55-60 (about the same speed as lorries) on duals, because it achieves a significant fuel saving and unless you're doing a long-distance motorway journey, does not cost you a significant amount of time. But on a single carriageway I always drive up to whatever the limit is unless a hazard or traffic prevents me from doing so, because anyone wanting to overtake me is going to have to take a risk. As you say, anyone who wishes to break the speed limit is not going to get any help from me in doing so, but on a single carriageway you should not be driving significantly below it in normal circumstances.

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That's why she no longer thinks it wise to go on dual carriageways, and to be frank, its not her 'driving' that is the problem, however, she realises her response to other people's poor driving might be too slow, or her restriction to 50 mph might annoy, which is simply a sad reflection of the level of intimidation on today's roads.

On the roads she does drive on, she is OK, especially as most are restricted to 30 mph and others 40 mph, and those with a national speed limit are rural lanes, where to drive at 60 mph would be nuts.

If other drivers want to go faster than the speed limit on town roads and get frustrated by an old biddy driving within the speed limit, that is THEIR problem.

But her reactions are still slower. This does not change because she only drives on 30/40 mph roads - does it !?

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That's why she no longer thinks it wise to go on dual carriageways, and to be frank, its not her 'driving' that is the problem, however, she realises her response to other people's poor driving might be too slow, or her restriction to 50 mph might annoy, which is simply a sad reflection of the level of intimidation on today's roads.

On the roads she does drive on, she is OK, especially as most are restricted to 30 mph and others 40 mph, and those with a national speed limit are rural lanes, where to drive at 60 mph would be nuts.

If other drivers want to go faster than the speed limit on town roads and get frustrated by an old biddy driving within the speed limit, that is THEIR problem.

It's not so much the speed that I have a problem with (though the ones that go 40mph EVERYWHERE need dealing with) it's when lack of observation and 'lazy' driving are happening regularly that I get wound up by elderly drivers.

I've lost count of the number of times I've been behind an elderly driver who has cut corners (even in a power-steered car!!), failed to put lights on in the dark. not used indicators, pulled out of junctions when it wasn't safe to do so, run red lights at pedestrian crossings... Noone can claim to be the perfect driver, but when it's repeated errors within a few minutes, you have to ask what some of them are doing on the road. Our local bus service is excellent BTW..

I'm not tarring all elderly drivers with the same brush though. One great aunt, when it was suggested to her that she ought to give up, took and passed her advanced motorist test at the age of 85.

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It's not so much the speed that I have a problem with (though the ones that go 40mph EVERYWHERE need dealing with) it's when lack of observation and 'lazy' driving are happening regularly that I get wound up by elderly drivers.

I've lost count of the number of times I've been behind an elderly driver who has cut corners (even in a power-steered car!!), failed to put lights on in the dark. not used indicators, pulled out of junctions when it wasn't safe to do so, run red lights at pedestrian crossings... Noone can claim to be the perfect driver, but when it's repeated errors within a few minutes, you have to ask what some of them are doing on the road. Our local bus service is excellent BTW..

I'm not tarring all elderly drivers with the same brush though. One great aunt, when it was suggested to her that she ought to give up, took and passed her advanced motorist test at the age of 85.

Yep I agree. However the facts of life dictate that older drivers are more likely to do these things.

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Yep I agree. However the facts of life dictate that older drivers are more likely to do these things.

...and tired ones... and poorly ones... though I agree a large percentage of 'persistently bad' drivers are elderly.

If they are not up to driving then they should 'lose their independence'. Locally we've had several near misses and one death recently, caused by elderly drivers, two of whom mounted the footpath. What about the 'independence' of those who are killed or have to live with the disablement caused by injuries?

Test everyone every 10 years, and lower the number of years between tests as people get older? Bus pass only issued on surrendering your drivers licence? We've got to do something, the population is ageing, dementia and diseases such as AMD and Type II Diabetes are on the increase.

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...and tired ones... and poorly ones... though I agree a large percentage of 'persistently bad' drivers are elderly.

If they are not up to driving then they should 'lose their independence'. Locally we've had several near misses and one death recently, caused by elderly drivers, two of whom mounted the footpath. What about the 'independence' of those who are killed or have to live with the disablement caused by injuries?

Test everyone every 10 years, and lower the number of years between tests as people get older? Bus pass only issued on surrendering your drivers licence? We've got to do something, the population is ageing, dementia and diseases such as AMD and Type II Diabetes are on the increase.

The only issue I have with that are those who could potentially lose their livelihoods if they failed an arbitrary test, say in their 30s or 40s...it would also be a administrative nightmare, with what, 30 millions drivers on the road...

For me, if you cannot navigate all roads (single lane, dual carriageway or motorways) then you shouldn't be on the road...a lot of drivers have no confidence behind the wheel, and its these drivers that can be the most dangerous...

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...and tired ones... and poorly ones... though I agree a large percentage of 'persistently bad' drivers are elderly.

If they are not up to driving then they should 'lose their independence'. Locally we've had several near misses and one death recently, caused by elderly drivers, two of whom mounted the footpath. What about the 'independence' of those who are killed or have to live with the disablement caused by injuries?

Test everyone every 10 years, and lower the number of years between tests as people get older? Bus pass only issued on surrendering your drivers licence? We've got to do something, the population is ageing, dementia and diseases such as AMD and Type II Diabetes are on the increase.

As a driver, I am more in fear of boy racers and impatient tailgating speed idiots on a regular basis, than I am of elderly drivers, who may annoy me but have never concerned me for my safety

And I would choose to be a passenger with the latter over either of the former,

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Perhaps some of the young and old need their brains tested

YOUNG

OLD

Yep - thje standard of driving in general is shocking. I use the Edinburgh bypass quite a lot. I keep a sensible distance behind - 2 second rule that every single person is taught whilst learning to drive.

I would hazard a rough guess that 5% of the population stick to this. It is incredible.

...and tired ones... and poorly ones... though I agree a large percentage of 'persistently bad' drivers are elderly.

If they are not up to driving then they should 'lose their independence'. Locally we've had several near misses and one death recently, caused by elderly drivers, two of whom mounted the footpath. What about the 'independence' of those who are killed or have to live with the disablement caused by injuries?

Test everyone every 10 years, and lower the number of years between tests as people get older? Bus pass only issued on surrendering your drivers licence? We've got to do something, the population is ageing, dementia and diseases such as AMD and Type II Diabetes are on the increase.

Yep I have said before. You should get the proper test once, then every 10 years or so get a very basic refresher test. Basic reactions, basic road sense. A few questions. Nothing too hard. Anyone that fails then has to take a proper test again.

I know it is mnore administration and I am generally against that. However driving on the roads regularly I think it is one area that needs something done.

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The only issue I have with that are those who could potentially lose their livelihoods if they failed an arbitrary test, say in their 30s or 40s...it would also be a administrative nightmare, with what, 30 millions drivers on the road...

For me, if you cannot navigate all roads (single lane, dual carriageway or motorways) then you shouldn't be on the road...a lot of drivers have no confidence behind the wheel, and its these drivers that can be the most dangerous...

Why do you need to navigate the speed and aggression of dual carriageways and motorways if your daily journeys mean that you never travel anywhere near them ? Should the old biddy pootling around Jersey need to be competent on motorways ?

That is akin to saying I should not sail around the UK coast because I would not have the confidence (stupidity) to sail around the Cape of Good Hope risking the rescue services.

Just know your limitations, don't push them. And that means retiring from B roads at the right time too

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Why do you need to navigate the speed and aggression of dual carriageways and motorways if your daily journeys mean that you never travel anywhere near them ? Should the old biddy pootling around Jersey need to be competent on motorways ?

That is akin to saying I should not sail around the UK coast because I would not have the confidence (stupidity) to sail around the Cape of Good Hope risking the rescue services.

Just know your limitations, don't push them. And that means retiring from B roads at the right time too

Bit of a strange analogy, but there you go... I've seen many a driver, especially on minor roads doing 30 in a 40 or 50...you see ppl trying to overtake, but often can't because a lot of these drivers hog the road - they sort of drift into the middle...they are generally poor drivers with little awareness of other road users... Motorway driving should become part of the driving test...I did it as part of my pass plus...it certainly helped me...

My nan gave up driving at 75...she knew when to quit...a lot of older ppl should do too, before their driving becomes hazardous and could seriously hurt someone...

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a lot of older ppl should do too, before their driving becomes hazardous and could seriously hurt someone...

i couldn't agree more with that statement. Know your limitations and when to quit.

I don't enjoy driving on motorways because of tailgaters hassling you out of the outside lane when you are overtaking at 80 mph,

But I clocked up over 350K accident free miles in my last car and so not enjoying the cut and thrust of the fast lane must make me lack confidence.

Having to prove you can drive on motorways when you never do so seems like nuts to me. Why not have a license prohibiting you from motorways if you lack experience ?

if you want a different analogy, you are quite happy to entrust your safety on a dash 7 to someone not qualified to fly a 737

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i couldn't agree more with that statement. Know your limitations and when to quit.

I don't enjoy driving on motorways because of tailgaters hassling you out of the outside lane when you are overtaking at 80 mph,

But I clocked up over 350K accident free miles in my last car and so not enjoying the cut and thrust of the fast lane must make me lack confidence.

Having to prove you can drive on motorways when you never do so seems like nuts to me. Why not have a license prohibiting you from motorways if you lack experience ?

if you want a different analogy, you are quite happy to entrust your safety on a dash 7 to someone not qualified to fly a 737

http://www.directline.com/about_us/driving-test-press-release.htm

Learning to drive on a motorway forces you to be aware of other road users, you also get to learn about speed & road discipline and about spacial awareness.. I think it makes you a better driver...the driving test should also include skid pan training...

A Dash 7 pilot wouldn't be allowed to fly a 737 until he'd passed the relevant courses....another strange analogy...

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  • 298 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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