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World Moves Closer To Food Price Shock

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The world has moved a step closer to a food price shock after the US government surprised traders by cutting stock forecasts for key crops, sending corn and soyabean prices to their highest level in 30 months.

The price jump comes after the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation warned last week that the world could see repetition of the 2008 food crisis if prices rose further. The trend is becoming a major concern in developing countries.

Financial Times link

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Take away credit cards in the UK and we'd have a REAL massive food price shock.

Until we adjourn the bankers, cease borrowing, and telling ourselves that things are ok, we will always be paying huge premiums on food and any other goods.

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The world has moved a step closer to a food price shock after the US government surprised traders by cutting stock forecasts for key crops, sending corn and soyabean prices to their highest level in 30 months.

The price jump comes after the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation warned last week that the world could see repetition of the 2008 food crisis if prices rose further. The trend is becoming a major concern in developing countries.

Financial Times link

These would be the traders who hold the commodity for around 30 secs or so and never actually take delivery? Speculators is a more correct term I feel.

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Take away credit cards in the UK and we'd have a REAL massive food price shock.

Until we adjourn the bankers, cease borrowing, and telling ourselves that things are ok, we will always be paying huge premiums on food and any other goods.

It could sort out all of the fat people out there

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It could sort out all of the fat people out there

But the thin will have starved to death first.

Perhaps fat people have invested in the right things after all?

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But the thin will have starved to death first.

Perhaps fat people have invested in the right things after all?

an intriguing viewpoint, maybe the thin fitter folks will eat the fatties and become fat themselves

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It could sort out all of the fat people out there

The wonder of market economics is that goods are allocated on the basis of ability to pay, not actual needs. Which is fine for TVs, or indeed many, many goods. But when it comes to food, water, housing, etc.. there can be drawbacks. Unless you are a strict libertarian, in which case there is no problem with excess people starving to death.

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Hmm, so we're all going to starve to death in order to keep houses unaffordable and the bankers in bonuses? Cool.

You know it makes sense

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Hmm, so we're all going to starve to death in order to keep houses unaffordable and the bankers in bonuses? Cool.

Be careful - some bankers might be offended if you go around saying things like that, then they'll need bigger bonuses to compensate for the upset.

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Be careful - some bankers might be offended if you go around saying things like that, then they'll need bigger bonuses to compensate for the upset.

Probably true - is there a word for finding something both very amusing and deeply infuriating?

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The UK is finished - it can no longer ever hope to balance its books in the future (at least under our Globalist 3 main parties). As it cannot balance its books it MUST PRINT ITS WAY INTO OBLIVION.

As it does so - so inflation will be seen in the most basic of essential purchases... food, heating and clothing.

This is not a game - it is what happens when a nation loses its self respect and its identity... as surely as winter follows summer - so we face the blackness of political corruption in all its horrors.

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The world has moved a step closer to a food price shock after the US government surprised traders by cutting stock forecasts for key crops, sending corn and soyabean prices to their highest level in 30 months.

The price jump comes after the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation warned last week that the world could see repetition of the 2008 food crisis if prices rose further. The trend is becoming a major concern in developing countries.

Financial Times link

Shame that Uncle Ben can't print soyabean...

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Is this due to someone doing Gods work?

Well, it's easier than arranging a global flood, what with the supernatural callout rates for world-engulfing plumbing (took 40 days to fix last time, apparently). Although apparently even Satan can't quite believe that we have a situation where food is turned into car fuel at the same time as people are starving, he thought about that once but it was too evil.

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A bit of a digression here, but we got a co-op leaflet throught he post this morning, full of "offers".

One that hit me between the eyes was the "half price offer" on chicken fillets: 4 for £3.50-ish.

I guess this is fair enough, until you realise Co-op are trying to position price them full price for over £7.

£7 for four chicken fillets? That's obscene.

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A bit of a digression here, but we got a co-op leaflet throught he post this morning, full of "offers".

One that hit me between the eyes was the "half price offer" on chicken fillets: 4 for £3.50-ish.

I guess this is fair enough, until you realise Co-op are trying to position price them full price for over £7.

£7 for four chicken fillets? That's obscene.

Food prices are shocking, but this does not seem that bad when you consider that to get 4 fillets you need 2 chickens.

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A bit of a digression here, but we got a co-op leaflet throught he post this morning, full of "offers".

One that hit me between the eyes was the "half price offer" on chicken fillets: 4 for £3.50-ish.

I guess this is fair enough, until you realise Co-op are trying to position price them full price for over £7.

£7 for four chicken fillets? That's obscene.

Co-op chickens are generally allowed a glimpse of the sky at some point in their lives, and don't get to eat the mashed remains of their ancestors. Hence the price.

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Co-op chickens are generally allowed a glimpse of the sky at some point in their lives, and don't get to eat the mashed remains of their ancestors. Hence the price.

But that is the weird thing. Normally, I buy from our local butcher who sources his poultry from our local farms where most of the chickens are free range (ie. they go out and scratch around a large field all day), and I will pay £6 for an entire chicken which does for four to five meals. My beef doesn't cost much more than supermarket beef, yet comes from farms up the road and is entirely organic. Our bacon is actually cheaper than supermarket bacon, and goes much further and tastes phenomenal.

I suppose quite a bit of it must be processing, packaging, logistics and staffing costs etc; all of which we don't pay for at the butchers (our red meat comes wrapped in paper).

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But that is the weird thing. Normally, I buy from our local butcher who sources his poultry from our local farms where most of the chickens are free range (ie. they go out and scratch around a large field all day), and I will pay £6 for an entire chicken which does for four to five meals. My beef doesn't cost much more than supermarket beef, yet comes from farms up the road and is entirely organic. Our bacon is actually cheaper than supermarket bacon, and goes much further and tastes phenomenal.

I suppose quite a bit of it must be processing, packaging, logistics and staffing costs etc; all of which we don't pay for at the butchers (our red meat comes wrapped in paper).

The days of supermarkets destroying their localised (small scale) competition by artificially lowering prices are coming to an end imho.

They can no longer afford it.

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But that is the weird thing. Normally, I buy from our local butcher who sources his poultry from our local farms where most of the chickens are free range (ie. they go out and scratch around a large field all day), and I will pay £6 for an entire chicken which does for four to five meals. My beef doesn't cost much more than supermarket beef, yet comes from farms up the road and is entirely organic. Our bacon is actually cheaper than supermarket bacon, and goes much further and tastes phenomenal.

I suppose quite a bit of it must be processing, packaging, logistics and staffing costs etc; all of which we don't pay for at the butchers (our red meat comes wrapped in paper).

If you don't mind me asking, what are the prices per kilo/lb like?

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The world has moved a step closer to a food price shock after the US government surprised traders by cutting stock forecasts for key crops, sending corn and soyabean prices to their highest level in 30 months.

The price jump comes after the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation warned last week that the world could see repetition of the 2008 food crisis if prices rose further. The trend is becoming a major concern in developing countries.

Financial Times link

And Peak Oil shock in my opinion

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  • 311 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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