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Asylum Claimants: 61,000 Unlikely To Be Traced

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-12157208

About 61,000 asylum claimants are unlikely to be traced by officials trying to clear backlogs, even if they have no right to remain in the UK.

The figure was released by the Commons' Home Affairs Committee, which said the immigration system was "still failing" amid a "rush" to clear backlogs.

And it said the future head of the UK Border Agency (UKBA) should receive a lower salary.

Immigration Minister Damian Green said the immigration system was recovering.

The committee has been asking the UKBA for regular updates on its attempts to clear backlogs of up to 400,000 asylum applications after one former home secretary said that it was not fit for purpose.

In many of the cases, officials had failed to properly conclude asylum applications, leading to settlement or removal of the individual. Others were shelved amid complex legal actions which were then overtaken by other events.

In its latest report on how well the UKBA was now performing, the MPs said that about one in seven cases - about 61,000 - would probably be closed because officials could not trace the individuals after such a long time.

This effectively mean the claimants and their families, if still in the UK, were in limbo - neither legally settled nor under threat of removal.

The committee said that it accepted the agency should not spend "unlimited time" trying to track every missing applicant, but added that some of those allowed to settle probably should not have been given leave to remain.

And it warned that officials also faced a "real danger" of a new backlog forming as they struggled to deal with new cases.

The report also said that the UKBA was unlikely to trace about 70 of the 1013 foreign national prisoners who were released prior to 2005 without being properly considered for deportation.

'Some progress'

Keith Vaz MP, chairman of the committee, said: "Much of the delay… stems from poor quality decision-making when the application is initially considered.

"The UK Border Agency has made some progress over the last few years in relation to new procedures and approaches, but is still failing to meet expectations.

"More consistent and rigorous scrutiny of applications would lead to fewer delays, fewer appeals, less uncertainty for the applicant, less pressure on the officials themselves, and probably lower costs for the UK taxpayer."

The committee also said the salary for the head of the UKBA should be slashed. The outgoing head of the agency, Lin Homer, is paid £208,000 a year.

Mr Green said: "We have known for some time that the asylum system was chaotic and has been recovering slowly.

"This government is absolutely committed to ensuring asylum cases are concluded faster, at lower cost, and that we continue to improve the quality of our decision making.

"It is also crucial that the UK Border Agency focuses its resources effectively - which is why it is sensible to target those individuals where our evidence shows they are still in the country."

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-12157208

About 61,000 asylum claimants are unlikely to be traced by officials trying to clear backlogs, even if they have no right to remain in the UK.

The figure was released by the Commons' Home Affairs Committee, which said the immigration system was "still failing" amid a "rush" to clear backlogs.

And it said the future head of the UK Border Agency (UKBA) should receive a lower salary.

Immigration Minister Damian Green said the immigration system was recovering.

The committee has been asking the UKBA for regular updates on its attempts to clear backlogs of up to 400,000 asylum applications after one former home secretary said that it was not fit for purpose.

In many of the cases, officials had failed to properly conclude asylum applications, leading to settlement or removal of the individual. Others were shelved amid complex legal actions which were then overtaken by other events.

In its latest report on how well the UKBA was now performing, the MPs said that about one in seven cases - about 61,000 - would probably be closed because officials could not trace the individuals after such a long time.

This effectively mean the claimants and their families, if still in the UK, were in limbo - neither legally settled nor under threat of removal.

The committee said that it accepted the agency should not spend "unlimited time" trying to track every missing applicant, but added that some of those allowed to settle probably should not have been given leave to remain.

And it warned that officials also faced a "real danger" of a new backlog forming as they struggled to deal with new cases.

The report also said that the UKBA was unlikely to trace about 70 of the 1013 foreign national prisoners who were released prior to 2005 without being properly considered for deportation.

'Some progress'

Keith Vaz MP, chairman of the committee, said: "Much of the delay… stems from poor quality decision-making when the application is initially considered.

"The UK Border Agency has made some progress over the last few years in relation to new procedures and approaches, but is still failing to meet expectations.

"More consistent and rigorous scrutiny of applications would lead to fewer delays, fewer appeals, less uncertainty for the applicant, less pressure on the officials themselves, and probably lower costs for the UK taxpayer."

The committee also said the salary for the head of the UKBA should be slashed. The outgoing head of the agency, Lin Homer, is paid £208,000 a year.

Mr Green said: "We have known for some time that the asylum system was chaotic and has been recovering slowly.

"This government is absolutely committed to ensuring asylum cases are concluded faster, at lower cost, and that we continue to improve the quality of our decision making.

"It is also crucial that the UK Border Agency focuses its resources effectively - which is why it is sensible to target those individuals where our evidence shows they are still in the country."

This is another case of JOKE UK, to me if they are going missing they should be deported once caught,no amnesty which is what they are all waiting for. The UK cannot provide jobs and services for the people who are here , never mind illegal,s.

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One often finds 61,000 people just vanish.

No need for a natural disaster in the UK as we have the incompetent government fumbling around in the dark.

As the last poster said, it's JOKE UK.

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Surely when a significant amount of them inevitably end up commiting a crime they'll be found then?

Or is this the libdems quietly announcing an amnesty? (suspension of law)

There is no mention of a missing asylum seeker's status (eg as an illegal entrant) on the Police National Computer unless he or she is one of the minute number of illegal entrants ever charged with this offence criminally, as opposed to being served "administrative" papers by an officer.

So the police officers will not know the arrested person's status unless they cross reference with the UKBA and an officer attends and carries out a fingerprint check to identify the person (obviously most arrested "missing" illegals will give false names hence the fingerprint cross check with the UKBA asylum system is vital).

Sadly my ex colleagues report that more often than not there are no spare officers available to attend police stations to check such persons - and they are deemed of low priority if holding the suspected nationality of people where their embassies will seldom if ever issue documents. An example would be a Chinese person - the Chinese embassy hates to issue travel documents for it's undocumented nationals held around the world for immigration offences - quite simply because if they delay or obstruct the world's immigration forces from sending its poor people home, then they lose out on foreign remittances sent back from such folks working illegally and boosting the Chinese economy. Further, they do not want their poor folks back home - plus keeping them overseas boosts the need for those countries economies to buy more stuff from China to house, clothe them etc (eg a UK slum landlord will need Chinese tat to maintain/furnish/repair the illegals flats etc).

It's a scandal and there is no pressure we can apply to China, and no politicians of any of our recent governments from the last 20 years have had the balls to deal with such countries as China, Iran, Russia.

The problem is made worse by people of similar ethnicity as the unremovable nationalities - who are naturally advised to pretend to be from those countries to frustrate removal (eg a Malaysian ethnic Chinese will ditch all documents and pretend to be "red" Chinese).

None of this would matter if we could bang them all up indefinitely like they do in Australia, Italy etc (where usually the person eventually gives up and reveals their real name - or gets family back home to obtain a real passport etc so they can be removed). But the Human Rights Act etc has forced our courts to shape our detention policy in such a way that - in non terrorist or criminal cases - only removable illegals can be detained. Therefore if there is no passport, or no decision has been made on a backlogged asylum application, the punter can walk and disappear.

It's a disaster. And short staffing caused by cuts will not make it any better, of course!

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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