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U. S. Judges Berate Bank Lawyers In Foreclosures

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http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/11/business/11lawyers.html?_r=1&ref=business

With judges looking ever more critically at home foreclosures, they are reaching beyond the bankers to heap some of their most scorching criticism on the lawyers.

In numerous opinions, judges have accused lawyers of processing shoddy or even fabricated paperwork in foreclosure actions when representing the banks.

Judge Arthur M. Schack of New York State Supreme Court in Brooklyn has taken aim at an upstate lawyer, Steven J. Baum, referring to one filing as “incredible, outrageous, ludicrous and disingenuous.”

But New York judges are also trying to take the lead in fixing the mortgage mess by leaning on the lawyers. In November, a judge ordered Mr. Baum’s firm to pay nearly $20,000 in fines and costs related to papers that he said contained numerous “falsities.” The judge, Scott Fairgrieve of Nassau County District Court, wrote that “swearing to false statements reflects poorly on the profession as a whole.”

More broadly, the courts in New York State, along with Florida, have begun requiring that lawyers in foreclosure cases vouch for the accuracy of the documents they present, which prompted a protest from the New York bar. The requirement, which is being considered by courts in other states, could open lawyers to disciplinary actions that could harm or even end careers.

Stephen Gillers, an expert in legal ethics at New York University, agreed with Judge Fairgrieve that the involvement of lawyers in questionable transactions could damage the overall reputation of the legal profession, “which does not fare well in public opinion” throughout history.

“When the consequence of a lawyer plying his trade is the loss of someone’s home, and it turns out there are documents being given to the courts that have no basis in reality, the profession gets a very big black eye,” Professor Gillers said.

:lol::lol::lol: Amazing even the lawyers don't want to take responsibility for what they say. Brilliant.

This just gets more surreal by the day.

So lawyers are quite happy to lie as long as it relates to paperwork which someone else gave them and told them was accurate.

But still your just following orders....

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http://www.nytimes.c...=1&ref=business

:lol::lol::lol: Amazing even the lawyers don't want to take responsibility for what they say. Brilliant.

This just gets more surreal by the day.

So lawyers are quite happy to lie as long as it relates to paperwork which someone else gave them and told them was accurate.

But still your just following orders....

Doesn't that means some of the lawyers have committed fraud?

Sling them in the jail with the bankers.

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Fraud you say?

I would have thought that lies to the court, are perjury. And perjury by anyone purporting to be a lawyer should carry a much stiffer penalty. Assets should be seized as well as a tough prison sentence in a closed prison for the guilty.

There are in the US, numerous cases where judges have turned a blind eye to these crimes that are being committed in court rooms. I dont know how you can go after such judges, but they should be gone after. In their case, the crime is corruption, more serious even than perjury.

If the law is applied correctly, and a few good people stand up to the fraud being committed by banksters, then there may be a solution to this financial disaster.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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